Corruption

Overview

No country is entirely free of corruption. But if corruption is deep enough it can hinder economic growth and good governance, and decay the fabric of society. Corruption is an obstacle to sustainable development, with the potential to enlarge economic gaps and breed organized crime. Unchecked corruption leaves little room for democracy to flourish; little room for freedom to expand; little room for justice to prevail.

We have made significant gains in the global fight against corruption. Better understandings of its economic, political and social costs have spurred recent international efforts to fight corruption, encourage transparency and increase accountability. Canada strongly supports international efforts to combat corruption, regarding it as a good governance issue, a crime problem, and a drag on economic, social and political development.

International Initiatives

Canada fights against corruption with the G20, the United Nations (UN), the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the Organization of American States (OAS), the Commonwealth, the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and various development banks. Canada ratified the UN Convention against Corruption, the first global anti-corruption treaty, in October 2007. It has also ratified the OECD Convention on Combating Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions and the Inter-American Convention Against Corruption  Canada also played an important part in negotiating the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNCTOC), which includes measures  to fight corruption. Canada has raised the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) relating to corruption and good governance in the OAS and OSCE. OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises also include a section on corruption.

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