Departmental Performance Report 2011-12 - Supplementary Information Tables

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Table of Contents

1.0 Details on Transfer Payment Programs

1.1 Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program (ACCBP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: December 9, 2009

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The ACCBP provides assistance to enhance the capacity of key beneficiary states, government entities and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats posed by international criminal activity, primarily in the Americas.

Two new initiatives were added to the ACCBP’s mandate in FY 2011-12. In fall 2012, the ACCBP began programming under a new, additional $12-million Human Smuggling envelope to support capacity-building projects assisting states in the detection and prevention of migrant smuggling operations abroad, with an initial focus on Southeast Asia. Prime Minister Harper officially announced this funding envelope during an official visit to Thailand in March 2012. The ACCBP also launched programming under the newly created Canadian Initiative for Security in Central America (CISCA), which will support projects that enhance justice and security-sector capacity. The ACCBP initiated three projects focusing on police professionalization and training, including the provision of equipment.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Increased the capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and respond to criminal activity through the provision of judicial and law enforcement training, technical assistance, the deployment of subject matter experts, and related equipment.
  • Increased the safety of Canadians and protection of Canadian security interests at home and abroad through the provision of international capacity-building assistance to address criminal threats in source and transit countries.
  • Approximately 55% of the ACCBP programming focused on Security Sector reform, with the remaining thematic priorities addressing crime prevention, illicit drugs, human trafficking and money laundering.
  • Geographic programming included work in Central America, the Caribbean, Mexico and South America to prevent and respond to threats posed by transnational criminal activity in the Americas.
Table 1: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Grants0.07.07.010.210.2-3.2
Total Contributions20.919.89.626.326.1-16.5
Total Program Activity20.926.816.636.536.3-19.7

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The Program spent $19.7M in additional projects over and above planned spending due to the creation of a $6 million envelope dedicated to address human smuggling as well as a $5 million envelope for Canadian Security Initiatives in Central America. Additionally, the program absorbed in-year surplus funds becoming available from within the department to respond to programming needs.

Audit Completed or Planned: An audit of one of the ACCBP project recipients was completed during the reporting year.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: The ACCBP evaluation is being performed, with anticipated end date in fall 2012.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.2 Commonwealth Secretariat

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Commonwealth Secretariat (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: September 28, 1965

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to the regular budget of the Commonwealth is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of Canada's membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and, to this end, to enhance relationships among the 54 Commonwealth member countries. For further information, see the Commonwealth Secretariat website.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Much of the regular budget is directed to supporting and implementing the decisions of the biennial Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) and a large number of regular meetings of Commonwealth sectoral ministers, including the Commonwealth Ministerial Action Group (CMAG) and Commonwealth ministers of foreign affairs, finance, health and education. Two significant decisions of the 2011 CHOGM implemented this year were the adoption of a number of recommendations of the Eminent Persons Group to reform and strengthen the Commonwealth, with ongoing consideration of remaining recommendations; and the adoption of recommendations proposed by the CMAG to improve its effectiveness.
  • Diplomatic interventions in the form of good offices and public pressure by the Secretariat and/or coordinated action by Commonwealth ministers to support democratic institutions and procedures as exemplified by the work of the reformed CMAG (of which Canada is a member) with regard to the transition of government in the Maldives.
  • Programs to build capacity in democratic and human rights procedures; and enhanced cooperation among Commonwealth countries related to economic, social and political development as shown by improved linkages between the Commonwealth and the G-20 processes. More effective programming has been made possible by reforms to the Commonwealth Secretariat, with increased accountability and transparency, and improved budgeting and financial reporting.
Table 2: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions5.15.05.15.15.00.1
Total Program Activity(ies)5.15.05.15.15.00.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of those negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: The Commonwealth Secretariat maintains an Audit Committee, an external auditor, and provides regular audited statements.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.3 Contributions Under the Global Partnership Program for the Destruction, Disposal and Securing of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction and Related Expertise

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Contributions under the Global Partnership Program (GPP) for the Destruction, Disposal and Securing of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction and Related Expertise (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: August 12, 2003

End Date: March 31, 2013

Description: To implement Canada's commitment to the G-8 Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, launched at the 2002 Kananaskis Summit, through projects for the dismantlement of nuclear submarines, destruction of chemical weapons, enhancement of nuclear and radiological security, redirection of former weapons scientists, and non-proliferation of dangerous biological materials. Canada committed up to $1 billion over 10 years to implement the goals of the Global Partnership, initially in the former Soviet Union where the threat was most acute. The justification for the Partnership was based on an assessment of threats to Canadian and international security following the terrorist attacks of September 2001. Evaluations at the G-8 level have identified the continuing seriousness of the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction (WMD) threats worldwide and the ongoing value of the Partnership's international cooperative threat-reduction approach. As a result, G-8 leaders agreed at the 2008 Toyako Summit to expand Partnership programming beyond the former Soviet Union. Twenty-two countries along with the countries of the European Union are engaged in projects, and more than US$20 billion has been pledged.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Short and medium term:

  • Canada supported Libya's efforts in the destruction of its remaining stockpile of chemical weapons by contributing $6 million to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).
  • In March 2012, at the the second Nuclear Security Summit in Seoul, Republic of Korea, Prime Minister Harper announced the renewal of DFAIT’s Global Partnership Program (GPP) until 2018 as part of an ongoing international effort to enhance nuclear security. GPP will continue expanded efforts to return additional inventories of highly enriched uranium materials currently stored at Chalk River Laboratories to the United States. In addition, a new $5-million voluntary contribution to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Fund (NSF) was announced to secure nuclear facilities and prevent nuclear trafficking.
  • Canada enhanced North American security with the completion of a nuclear security project in Mexico. The project involved the conversion of a Mexican highly enriched uranium research reactor to more proliferation-resistant low-enriched uranium and the repatriation to the United States of a significant quantity of spent highly enriched uranium of U.S. origin.
  • Canada supported the delivery of two regional workshops designed to promote awareness of international legal instruments relevant to nuclear security and provided assistance for the efforts of participating countries to ratify and implement these instruments. Representatives from 12 countries attended these workshops.
  • Canada has made tangible contributions to nuclear and radiological security in Russia, including supporting upgrades at seven Russian facilities housing nuclear material.
  • Canada played a critical role in Russia’s efforts to destroy approximately 60% of its 40,000-tonne stockpile of chemical weapons through contributions to the construction of two chemical weapon destruction facilities at Shchuch’ye and Kizner.
  • Canada helped secure WMD materials and facilities by the defueling of the nuclear reactor of a Russian Akula Class submarine, resulting in the recovery and securing of approximately 300 kg of highly enriched uranium.
  • Canada helped secure dangerous pathogens in priority countries and regions (Americas, Africa, Asia, Middle East and North Africa) by strengthening capacities for bio-containment; bio-risk management and disease surveillance; diagnostics and response through support for field epidemiology training programs; implementation of WHO's International Health Regulations; strengthening health security and emergency preparedness at points of entry (ports, airports, ground crossings).
  • In order to build awareness of proliferation threats associated with WMD expertise and to promote responsible science, Canada implemented a workshop on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) security and scientific collaboration in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and supported two international workshops delivered by the World Institute for Nuclear Security (WINS).
  • Canada helped increase sustainable employment and commercialization opportunities for over 4,000 former weapons scientists with WMD-related expertise through the provision of funding for more than 250 research and capacity-building initiatives across the former Soviet Union through the International Science & Technology Center (ISTC), the Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU), and the Closed Nuclear Cities Partnership.
  • To support the implementation of the legally binding obligations of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540, Canada supported the establishment of a regional coordinator within the Central American Integration System (SICA) in response to a request for assistance made through the 1540 Committee.
Table 3: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions119.9111.587.592.992.9-5.4
Total Program Activity(ies)119.9111.587.592.992.9-5.4

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The GPP spent $5.42 million more than planned in 2010-11. The GPP reallocated funds for the Chernobyl Shelter Fund mandated by the Prime Minister on the margins of the Nuclear Security Summit in May 2010, with expenditures made in FY 2011-12.

Audit Completed or Planned: GPP-BIO - Liaison visits to the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) are planned for FY 2012-2013 (completion expected by July 31, 2012, with report due mid-August 2012).

GPP-BIO: An audit of INTERPOL is tentatively planned for late 2012.

GPP- NRS: In Jan 2012, officials from DFAIT’s Office of the Inspector General performed an Audit Liaison Visit to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This liaison visit was the third to the DOE, with previous visits having taken place in November 2008 and February 2009. Since FY 2006-07, the DOE has received over $42 million in programming funds for the GPP to support the implementation of 10 projects.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: In 2011-12, the ground work for the GPP Summative Evaluation was laid, with completion expected by September 2012.

GPP-BIO: Evaluations of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) are planned for FY 2012-2013 (completed as of July 31, 2012).

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.4 Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program (CTCBP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: September 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Provision of training, equipment, infrastructure and technical assistance to enhance the capacity of key beneficiary states, government entities and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats posed by terrorist activity, in a manner consistent with international counterterrorism and human rights obligations, norms and standards.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Increased capacity of beneficiary states and government entities to prevent and respond to terrorist activity through the provision of technical assistance, including through the deployment of Canadian experts, and related equipment.
  • Increased capacity of international organizations responsible for supporting state-based counterterrorism-related efforts.
  • Increased safety of Canadians and protection of Canadian interests at home and abroad by increasing international law enforcement capabilities to detect and prevent terrorist networks.
  • Approximately 50% of programming focused on enhancing the capabilities of Law Enforcement, Military and Security Intelligence.
  • A significant portion of programming was delivered in Africa and focused on providing basic training and related equipment for front-line law enforcement officers.
Table 4: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Grants4.74.95.58.08.0-2.5
Total Contributions4.313.24.99.18.9-4.0
Total Program Activity(ies)9.018.110.417.116.9-6.5

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The Program absorbed in-year surplus funds becoming available from within the department to respond to programming needs.

Audit Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.5 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: 1945

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the FAO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to agricultural development and to provide the Government with a voice in the international community.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Higher levels of nutrition and standards of living of the peoples within member nations;
  • Improvements in the efficiency of the production and distribution of food and agricultural products, including fisheries, marine products and forestry products; and
  • Better living conditions for rural populations.

For more details, visit the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations website.

Table 5: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions15.814.616.616.616.60.0
Total Program Activity(ies)15.814.616.616.616.60.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: FAO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: FAO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.6 Global Commerce Support Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Commerce Support Program (GCSP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: December 11, 2008

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Approved under the new Transfer Payment Policy, the GCSP is a contribution program that harmonizes three previously existing programs under one umbrella mechanism:

  • Invest Canada-Community Initiatives (ICCI)
  • Going Global Innovation (GGI)
  • Global Opportunities for Associations (GOA)

The objective of the program is to build a stronger and more competitive Canadian capacity to compete in the global economy.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved in 2011-12:

  • Enhanced the capability and effectiveness of Canadian communities to attract, retain and expand foreign direct investment as shown by 100 approved projects;
  • Increased Canadian science and technological innovation and commercialization opportunities as shown by 71 approved projects; and
  • Stimulated the engagement of Canadian industry associations, their members and industry-at-large in international markets in order to expand commercial linkages and facilitate future successes abroad as shown by 104 approved packages of activities.
Table 6: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total ContributionsN/A5.46.06.05.70.3
Total Program Activity(ies)N/A5.46.06.05.70.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Project funding is approved based on estimates, however, actual expenditures were lower in a number of cases. Regular monitoring and re-profiling measures of funding are in place to maximize the program’s budget.

Audit Completed or Planned: An early implementation audit was conducted and completed in FY 2011-2012.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: An evaluation is planned for FY 2012-2013.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: A competitive process requiring applicants to compete for funding ensures high engagement in the GCSP. In addition, the funding program requires applicants to undertake specific activities, achieve milestones and work toward identified results. Funded recipients undertake and successfully deliver business and innovation projects that otherwise could not be undertaken without GCSP funding.

1.7 Global Peace and Security Fund and Component Programs

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF) and its sub-programs: the Global Peace and Security Program, the Global Peace Operations Program, and the Glyn Berry Program for Peace and Security (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: October 3, 2005; made operational September 18, 2006.

End Date: GPSF authorities are subject to renewal by Cabinet before March 31, 2013.

Description: Sourced from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope (IAE), the GPSF funds the operations of the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) and is used to conduct international assistance programming in places affected by war, instability and natural disasters such as Afghanistan, Haiti and Sudan. START and the GPSF fill a policy, institutional, funding and programming gap between CIDA humanitarian and long-term development assistance and DND’s military and training assistance. START combines fast and flexible programming, specialized policy expertise and civilian deployment capacity and established whole-of-government crisis response coordination tools.

START programming provides timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges that implicate Canadian interests and reflect Canadian foreign policy priorities.

The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START). To ensure policy coherence and to avoid duplication, various interdepartmental and intradepartmental committees (at DM, ADM and DG levels) are called upon as required to inform and guide emerging priority-setting exercises and implement Cabinet-mandated priorities in the whole-of-government context. START is housed in the International Security, Africa, Latin America and Caribbean Branch of DFAIT (IFM), which is responsible for START’s financial, human and physical resources.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states as shown by:

  • In Afghanistan, START disbursed $9.5 million to support activities that included training for Afghan corrections officials and the Afghan National Police; the promotion of regional diplomacy; improved border and customs cooperation and management with Pakistan; and the clearance of landmines.
  • In alignment with the Government’s Americas Strategy, START disbursed approximately $26.3 million for 38 projects in Haiti, Colombia and Guatemala that promoted freedom, security, human rights, democracy, and rule of law.
  • In Haiti, START disbursed $17.2 million to develop a more effective, accountable and professional rule of law system by supporting the reconstruction and refurbishment of critical police and judicial infrastructure that was damaged by the most recent earthquake; contributed specialized equipment and vehicles and deployed 135 Canadian police officers and 18 corrections experts to provide training and technical support to Haitian national police officers, coast guards, corrections officers, and judges.
  • Canada supported the newly independent Government of South Sudan to improve its capacity to maintain security, effectively implement the rule of law, uphold human rights, and deliver basic services to the people of South Sudan by providing training, equipment and infrastructure to the justice, police, airport authority, and prison sectors.
  • START contributed to the Middle East Peace Process by establishing Joint Operations Centres that brought together representatives of all Palestinian security agencies and provided a means for the Palestinian security forces and Israeli defence forces to communicate and coordinate activities and maintain situational awareness for ongoing stability operations and enhanced security in Israel and the West Bank.
  • In advance of Egypt’s democratic transition, START provided training to 120 Internet bloggers to equip them with the skills required to effectively disseminate political information and analysis, free of the government’s control of the media. Manuals were also produced on the use of social media for reporting, to be distributed to Egyptian civil society.
  • START contributed approximately $11.6 million to projects that advanced democracy by supporting legal and judicial development, human rights, an open media and the free flow of information, and democratic participation and civil society in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.
  • Due in part to Canada’s support, Jordan recently declared itself mine-free. Canada continues to support other countries such as Afghanistan, Colombia, Sudan, Tajikistan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Chad and Mozambique in building national capacity and encouraging national ownership of mine action initiatives.

Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations as shown by:

  • In collaboration with key allies, START responded to the emergency situation in Libya by developing a plan of engagement that resulted in Canada contributing $4 million to clear explosive remnants of war and to secure stockpiles of conventional weapons that posed threats to the security of civilians at the national and regional levels.
  • Canada’s support to building local and regional capacities to conduct peace operations included specialized training to police officers from 80 countries on protecting the rights of girls and women, and reducing incidences of sexual and gender-based violence. Several states, including Colombia, Peru and Rwanda, have incorporated a greater focus on gender issues and the rights of women into their peace operation training.
  • Canada assisted the Justice Rapid Response (JRR), a multilateral mechanism designed to rapidly deploy criminal justice experts to international investigations, in becoming a legal entity under Swiss law. As a legal entity, JRR will allow Canada and the international community to provide much needed support for the effective investigation of human rights abuses and the enforcement of international criminal justice, thus strengthening international response to conflict resolution and post-conflict peacebuilding.
  • Canada supported the UN Mediation Support Unit in developing a roster of mediation experts, enabling the unit to rapidly deploy experts to active peace negotiations in an effort to prevent crises. Canada also assisted in the development of online resources and reference materials for international mediators, filling a much-needed demand, as demonstrated by the 1,000 mediators who subscribed in the first six months.
  • Canada, through START, has been a strong supporter of the Special Court for Sierra Leone and welcomed the guilty verdict that was recently handed down against former Liberian President Charles Taylor. This conviction represented a milestone for international criminal justice as it concerned the first-ever conviction of a former head of state by an international criminal tribunal for planning, aiding, and abetting war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations as shown by:

  • The Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, produced with support from START, were endorsed by the UN Human Rights Council as the authoritative global reference for business and human rights. These principles provide, for the first time, a global standard for preventing and addressing the risk of adverse impacts on human rights linked to business activities.
  • Many multinational mining exploration and development companies operate in areas suffering from violent conflict and chronic instability that stems from the control and access to natural resources that companies seek to extract. With a view toward preventing conflict or crisis, Canada supported the production of a simple and practical guide to help mining exploration and development companies approach their routine business activities in a manner that furthers positive relations with local communities, even where tensions or conflict exist in the local operating environment.
  • The African Union’s Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), the first legally binding regional instrument in the world to impose on states the obligations to protect and assist IDPs, requires ratification by 15 countries in order to become legally binding. Canada assisted the African Union in moving closer to implementing this landmark convention and assisted in raising awareness and support among member states, which contributed to six new countries ratifying the convention in 2011-12. A total of 11 have ratified so far.
Table 7: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Grants19.626.030.019.813.116.9
Total Contributions82.099.778.456.550.727.7
Total Program Activity(ies)101.6125.7108.476.363.844.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Canada’s military engagement in Afghanistan ended in July 2011, and START programming shifted from regionally focused programming, mainly in Kandahar province, to nationally oriented programming based in Kabul. This shift, which required standing back up 100% of the Afghanistan envelope, combined with delays in approvals occasioned by the 2011 elections, is responsible for a significant portion of the programming variance.

Audit Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagements of Applicants and Recipients: A GPSF application template (as well as general information and objectives about the program) is posted on the START website; applicants may submit their project proposals at any time of year.

1.8 Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: January 1, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Description: These grants and contributions expand international education programs to more effectively and efficiently advance departmental priorities, which include contributing to Canada’s competitiveness and promoting democracy, the rule of law and human rights.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA’S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada’s benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Raised awareness of Canada among leaders, decision makers and the general public in foreign countries as shown by:
    • International Scholarships Program (ISP), a key tool for advancing departmental priorities such as the Americas strategy. The ISP provided mobility for over 800 students and researchers from priority countries, approximately 80% of whom came from the Americas region. As the program becomes more established, alumni scholars speak about education in Canada, thus promoting Canada as a study and research destination.
    • ISP also organized a set of value-added activities that raise awareness abroad:
      • The Emerging Leaders in the Americas Program (ELAP) Collaboration Mission in October 2011 welcomed 27 senior representatives of postsecondary institutions from 11 countries in the Americas to meet their Canadian counterparts and establish partnerships.
      • The Post-doctoral Research Fellowships (PDRF) round table was attended by 50 fellows from 11 OECD priority countries who shared their research and met officials from national granting agencies and officials from their home countries.
    • ISP gave a one-time contribution of $5 million to the Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan (CSFP) Endowment Fund, via IAE lapsing funds from START projects, in response to a request from the Council for Education in the Commonwealth following the support voiced by Canada’s Prime Minister for the program at the 2009 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Trinidad and Tobago. The Fund is an excellent way to include more countries in the CSFP, to widen and intensify the exchange of research into areas of vital concern to global well-being, to build capacities that many of the smaller and less accessible Commonwealth countries find difficult to nurture, and to encourage Canadians to study abroad gaining expertise, language skills and cultural experience. CSFP is also an important means of sustaining relationships and cooperation within the Commonwealth.
  • Canada’s knowledge advantage was recognized worldwide and served to strengthen Canadian interests and economic prosperity as shown by:
    • ISP coordinated discussions among stakeholders, partners and associations that led to the adoption of a pan-Canadian approach to host 12,000 Brazilian scholarship recipients in the next four years under the Government of Brazil’s Science Without Borders (SWB) scholarship program. SWB will have a notable contribution to the Canadian economy as every international student in Canada is spending an average of $31,000 per year during their academic stay, according to the 2011 Kunin Economic Impact of International Education on Canada report commissioned by DFAIT,.
    • The 11 Canada-Brazil joint research projects and the 24 Canada-Haiti joint academic projects promoted the internationalization of Canada’s post-secondary institutions as well as their research expertise.
    • In alignment with the revised Canadian International Education Strategy, scholarships are important marketing tools predicated upon institutional linkages between Canadian and foreign post-secondary institutions. The short-term awards and other DFAIT initiatives are key tools for promoting Canada as a choice destination for studies and/or research- Thereby contributing to the growth of the $8-billion sector.
    • ISP renegotiated the Canada China Scholars Exchange Program (CCSEP) MOU to expand eligibility for Canadian participants that was announced during the Prime Minister’s official visit to China, during which education was agreed to be the fifth pillar in Canada-China relations.
    • The Conference of the Americas on International Education (CAIE), a Canadian initiative held in Brazil in April 2012, provided a key forum and profile for Canadian academic institutions at which research and innovation partnerships with the region were strengthened. The secretariat for the Conference was funded by the Aid of Academic Relations grant program.
    • High-level provincial officials and experts, supported by a grant from DFAIT, participated at international meetings organized by the OECD, UNESCO, the Organization of American States (OAS) and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), where Canada’s academic excellence was promoted.
Table 8: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Grants8.27.69.96.95.14.8
Total Contributions15.310.08.015.415.4-7.4
Total Program Activity(ies)23.517.617.922.320.5-2.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): For the grant budget, the table shows that we are under by $4.8M. In reality, there was an amount of $3,000,000.00 transferred over to the contribution budget. There is also an amount of $1,826,044 that was left unspent in the free balance. This is because all grants had to be approved by the Minister. Since the Minister did not approve all grants, we were left with an amount unspent for fiscal year 2011-2012.

For the contribution budget, we received an additional amount of $3,000,000.00 transferred over from the grant budget. We also received an amount of $5,000,000.00 to cover the payment for a contribution to the Association of Commonwealth. This would explain why the table would show a negative amount of $7.4M for fiscal year 2011-2012.

Audit Completed or Planned: The most recent audit was completed in 2010-2011, and the resulting recommendations have been applied or are nearly completed. The next audit is scheduled for 2014-2015.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: The most recent evaluation was completed in 2009-2010, and the recommendations have been applied. The next evaluation is scheduled for 2014-2015.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Special events: In the context of the Understanding Canada program, a one-day special event was held in May 2011 during which representatives from all Canadian Studies associations discussed the program and possible improvements to it.

ISP recipients are encouraged to share their study or research experience in Canada through written testimonials, which are used in promotional material and posted on the web, as well as through participation in education-related events organized by missions abroad.

Select recipients under ELAP participate in a week-long democracy study tour in Ottawa where students are exposed to Canadian models of governance, human rights, open media, elections, financial accountability and transparency, corporate social responsibility, and civil society.

All fellows under Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships (PDRF) are invited to attend a three-day round table to introduce them to additional research and funding opportunities in Canada for the purpose of sustaining interest in Canada as a research destination of choice.

1.9 International Atomic Energy Agency

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: December 19, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the IAEA is a legally binding obligation of membership. Payment is made to ensure that membership is in good standing and to maintain influence and credibility in a key international body, the aims of which Canada supports. The IAEA, the world's centre for nuclear cooperation, works to further the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technology, in particular by verifying that states adhere to their commitments to use nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes. Canada has significant interests at the IAEA, based on the importance of the Agency's role in advancing the goals of nuclear non-proliferation, safety and security, as well as Canada’s advanced and extensive nuclear energy and radioisotope production industries, and its important uranium sector.

This assessed contribution does not include the assessed voluntary contribution to the IAEA Technical Cooperation Program, which remains a CIDA responsibility.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • The IAEA's major programs were effectively and efficiently implemented as reflected in the Agency's biennial program and budget;
  • Canada effectively participated in the Agency's activities as shown by Canada’s continued leadership at the IAEA Board of Governors, and the ongoing participation of Canadian experts in the fields of nuclear safety, nuclear security, nuclear safeguards, and technical cooperation;
  • The Canadian nuclear industry received direct and indirect technical and commercial dividends as a result of the nature of the IAEA’s work in promoting the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear science and technology; and
  • IAEA actions and decisions were consistent with Canadian foreign policy priorities.
Table 9: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions13.413.214.014.013.70.3
Total Program Activity(ies)13.413.214.014.013.70.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The mechanism by which expenses are assessed and apportioned is re-examined annually at the IAEA General Conference. This is done to take into account a myriad of factors, including the operational and administrative costs of the organization, salaries and benefits of staff, travel, specialized training and equipment, maintenance of the premises, etc., usually after the period in which domestic estimates are produced.

The assessment is based on and adopted from the United Nations Scale of Assessment, approved every three years by the UN General Assembly (last approved in December 2009).

Canada is obligated by the IAEA Statute to pay its assessments once they are approved by the IAEA General Conference.

Audit Completed or Planned: The IAEA’s Office of Internal Oversight Services provides functions such as internal audit, program monitoring, program evaluation, inspections, consulting and investigations. The IAEA also appoints an external auditor to audit the IAEA’s accounts. The current external auditor (until the end of this year) is the vice-president of the German Supreme Audit Institution (Bundesrechnungshof).

Canada's representatives to the IAEA will have access to any audit and financial reports produced by the various oversight bodies and presented to the Board of Governors or General Conference. DFAIT officials are able to review these reports and advocate Canadian issues as required.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: The results of this year’s audit will be made available at the upcoming IAEA General Conference in September 2012.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.10 International Criminal Court

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Criminal Court (ICC) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: April 1, 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Through its support to the ICC, Canada has provided leadership in promoting accountability for the most serious criminal acts known to humankind, thus contributing to international peace and stability. Canada was a key player in the creation of the ICC and has been successful in strengthening the ICC’s role as an instrument in the global fight against impunity. There are currently 121 States Parties to the Rome Statute. This is a relatively new international organization; therefore, small budget increases are anticipated.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • The ICC is the first permanent international court with jurisdiction to investigate and prosecute persons accused of the most serious crimes of international concern. To date, there are 121 States Parties to the Rome Statute.
  • The ICC has 16 cases open in seven countries: Uganda, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kenya, Libya, Sudan, the Central African Republic and Côte d’Ivoire.
  • In the Uganda situation, the four suspects are still at large.
  • In the DRC situation, the four accused are in custody and one is at large. The trials of Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui started in 2009. The charges against Callixte Mbarushimana were not confirmed and he was released from ICC custody in December 2011.
  • Thomas Lubanga Dyilo was convicted on March 14, 2012, and on July 10, 2012, was sentenced to 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • The charges against four individuals in the Kenya situation were confirmed in January 2012 and two cases have been set for trial in March 2012.
  • In the Darfur (Sudan) situation, five individuals face charges. Arrest warrants have been issued for Ahmad Harun, Ali Kushayb and Sudanese President Omar Al Bashir, but all three remain at large. Charges were confirmed against two other men, Abdallah Banda Abakaer Nourain and Saleh Mohammed Jerbo Jamus, in March 2011 and both are awaiting trial.
  • The two suspects in Libya remain at large.
  • The trial of Jean-Pierre Bemba in the Central African Republic situation has been ongoing since November 2010.
  • Côte D’Ivoire is not a State Party, but accepted the ICC’s jurisdiction. Laurent Gbagbo is in custody and his confirmation of charges hearing was scheduled to begin August 13, 2012.
  • The ICC carried on all other activities required and expected of a judicial body functioning in accordance with international standards of justice.
Table 10: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions15.26.46.56.96.8-0.3
Total Program Activity(ies)15.26.46.56.96.8-0.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Total payment was $6,836,241.31 and the estimated budget of $6,875,290.09 was prepared prior to adoption of the final budget by the States parties, therefore there is a variance of $30,048.78.

Audit Completed or Planned: The ICC’s Office of Internal Audit conducts compliance, performance and financial audits. An external auditor conducts an annual audit of the ICC in conformance with generally accepted common auditing standards. An Audit Committee, chaired by an external member, meets bi-annually to provide strategic advice on organizational matters. The Committee on Budget and Finance, which meets twice a year and reports to the Assembly of States Parties, provides a mechanism for budgetary and financial review and monitoring of the resources of the ICC. Canada is a member of Committee on Budget and Finance.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.11 International Labour Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Labour Organization (ILO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: The ILO was founded in 1919, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the ILO, a UN specialized agency, is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to international labour and social policy issues and to provide the Government with a voice in the international community.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Developed and effectively supervised international labour standards and realized fundamental principles and rights at work;
  • Engaged in targeted action against child labour, giving priority to the urgent elimination of its worst forms;
  • Contributed to poverty reduction through promotion of coherent economic and social policies that support employment creation;
  • Assisted constituents in the development of skills and employability policies and programs for decent work;
  • Developed better instruments and tools for policy analysis and formulation that support good governance and the extension of social protections to vulnerable workers;
  • Strengthened social dialogue on labour and social policy issues at the national and international levels; and
  • Improved organizational effectiveness, transparency and accountability.

For more details, visit the International Labour Organization website.

Table 11: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions11.712.113.713.712.51.2
Total Program Activity(ies)11.712.113.713.712.51.2

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: The ILO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: The ILO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.12 International Organisation of La Francophonie

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Organisation of La Francophonie (L’Organisation internationale de la Francophonie [OIF]) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: March 9, 1972

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s statutory contribution to the OIF and two related ministerial conferences.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Continued to undertake cooperation programs and activities as shown by the delivery of the OIF’s program. (Note: it is the responsibility of the OIF to track the programs and activities and to report monthly to member states).
  • Continued to promote Canadian interests as shown by an active participation in the institutional setting of the OIF and the different meetings at official, sherpa and ministerial levels.
  • The OIF policies and statement were aligned with Canada’s political and economic objectives as demonstrated by Canada’s active participation in OIF meetings.
Table 12: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions13.714.413.413.513.40.0
Total Program Activity(ies)13.714.413.413.513.40.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluation Completed or Planned: No evaluation was planned.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The OIF is responsible for this activity.

1.13 Investment Cooperation Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Investment Cooperation Program (ICP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: January 4, 2010

End Date: Ongoing

Description: This program assists private sector firms registered in Canada with the cost of exploring investment opportunities in developing countries in order to reduce poverty and create sustainable employment and economic growth. The program does not finance the actual investment; rather, it provides support for activities surrounding an investment. Specifically, the program contributes up to 75% of the cost of studying the viability of an investment, demonstrating and adapting appropriate technologies, and undertaking activities aimed at making investments, including public investments, more sustainable. The program is part of Canada's official development assistance for developing countries.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA’S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The International Agenda is shaped to Canada’s benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved: Investment projects take up to three years to be fully implemented, and companies are only required to report results three years following full implementation of the project proposal. In 2011-12, the program had yet to receive any final results reports. These reports will provide data on the ICP program’s development impact including: the number of businesses that the ICP program helped to create, expand or modernize; the number of skilled and unskilled jobs created in developing countries; and, the increase in sales of Canadian and developing-country partner firms’ products or services.

Table 13: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total ContributionsN/A6.020.014.63.816.2
Total Program Activity(ies)N/A6.020.014.63.816.2

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The program has not had the level take-up by the Canadian business community that was expected. A marketing program that was expected to increase demand for the program was delayed until the fall of 2011. Furthermore, recipient audits conducted in early 2012 uncovered irregularities resulting in the suspension of the program, effective May 18, 2012. The suspension remains in effect until at least the completion of a review of the system of internal controls within the program.

Audit Completed or Planned: A horizontal audit on the management of transfer payments, which includes the INC program, began in 2011-12 and is expected to be completed in fall of 2012-13.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: A formative evaluation of the program commenced in 2011-12 and is expected to be completed in the fall of 2012.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: The INC program tallied the following applicant engagement activity in 2011-12: participated in a total of 13 outreach visits to the Canadian business community across Canada, as well as one international outreach visit to India; conducted four direct mail campaigns targeting 3,000 to 4,000 Canadian companies (emphasizing under-represented regions in Canada); was featured in an October 2011 edition of CanadaExport; and, conducted meetings with business consultants in Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver during the fall of 2011 to broaden awareness of the program in those regions that were under-represented by the program.

1.14 North Atlantic Treaty Organization Civil Administration

Name of Transfer Payment Program: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Civil Administration (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: January 1, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to NATO is a legally binding obligation of membership based on the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty. Canada’s contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding the administrative budget of NATO, an international organization vital to Canadian defence and security interests. NATO was designed to promote the stability of the North Atlantic area and to safeguard the freedom and security of its people by political and military means, based on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and international law. The NATO civil budget, structured along "output based" lines in response to objectives set annually by the North Atlantic Council, covers the activities of the NATO Secretary General, NATO headquarters and NATO international staff. The NATO civil administration supports the process of consensus building and decision making among alliance members and manages NATO’s relations with its partners. The NATO civil budget also supports the work of various NATO agencies with specialized responsibilities. An effective and efficient NATO civil administration assists alliance members in promoting security and stability in the North Atlantic area and in responding effectively to current security challenges, particularly in Afghanistan. The NATO accounts are subject to annual audit by the International Board of Auditors for NATO.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Through its contribution to the NATO Civil Administration budget, DFAIT has promoted within NATO the following results:

  • Effective decision making by the Alliance in pursuit of NATO’s objectives of stability and security in the North Atlantic region, Afghanistan and beyond as shown, for example, by the process of transition of lead responsibility for security in Afghanistan to Afghan control by the end of 2014;
  • Support to NATO operations as shown by NATO’s successful conclusion of Operation Unified Protector supporting the enforcement of UN Security Council resolutions to protect civilians in Libya, as well as ongoing NATO operations in Afghanistan, Kosovo, and elsewhere;
  • Appropriate response to current and emerging defence and security challenges as shown, for example, by ongoing progress on NATO missile defence and cooperation in cyber-defence;
  • Enhanced relations with NATO partners and cooperation with other international organizations as shown by successful engagement with partners in current and recent operations and the implementation of new policies on enhancing cooperation with partners; and
  • Proper management of the alliance's resources as shown by ongoing reform and transformation initiatives.
Table 14: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions22.218.126.926.923.93.0
Total Program Activity(ies)22.218.126.926.923.93.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The NATO budget is assessed in euros. Fluctuations in the exchange rate and lower-than-estimated costs contributed to the variance between the planned spending and the actual spending.

Audit Completed or Planned: The financial statements of the civil budget and the pension schemes are audited by the International Board of Auditors for NATO (IBAN) each year in May and June.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: As a member of the alliance, Canada regularly evaluates NATO’s performance.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.15 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: March 20, 1975

End Date: Ongoing

Description: To pay the assessed contribution required of Canada for its participation as a member of the OECD. The contribution pays for the Secretariat (professionals and support staff who provide high-quality research and analysis) and maintenance of the headquarters, located in Paris.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • The OECD work programs and policy positions reflect input from across the Canadian government and support priorities in areas such as productivity and competitiveness, innovation, skills, trade and jobs, foreign investment, anti-corruption, gender and development cooperation;
  • The OECD continued to address common economic problems, including impacts from the ongoing economic downturn, by pursuing strategies for inclusive growth and jobs and working cooperatively with members on the use of “soft law” and on the preparation of guidelines and agreements;
  • Canada continued to influence policy development among OECD members and non-members to improve the functioning of the international economy, including work in support of the G-8 and G-20 on trade and investment liberalization, jobs and growth, and structural reforms;
  • The OECD also continued to analyze new and emerging issues, both domestic and global, that affect Canada’s economy and standard of living, including green growth, innovation, skills, food security, and the linkages between trade and jobs;
  • The OECD maintained its sound management by working to improve internal governance processes to improve efficiency and effectiveness, including developing efficiencies reports that are a leading example among international organizations, and by continuing its ongoing in-depth evaluations of OECD work;
  • The OECD undertook institutional reforms to improve the OECD's ability to cope with new issues and power dynamics by reforming the Executive Committee in Special Session to increase its relevance and strategic nature and by modernizing processes for non-member participation in OECD work and for the selection of Chairpersons in OECD bodies (Working Group on Bribery);
  • OECD members reaffirmed their commitment to increase engagement with major emerging economies, reflecting Canadian priorities to increase the long-term effectiveness of the organization and to build relationships with China, India, and the Americas (particularly Brazil).
Table 15: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions14.511.811.511.511.50.0
Total Program Activity(ies)14.511.811.511.511.50.0

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Planned amounts are calculated in euros and are based on the previous year’s assessed contribution, increased by a small amount to reflect the current rate of inflation in France (the OECD is based in Paris). Canada’s share of the budget changes annually as it is based on a formula that takes into account a country’s three-year average GDP and population statistics. Variances also occur due to exchange rate fluctuations with the euro.

Audit Completed or Planned: Audits are performed annually by both internal and external auditors, and the reports are reviewed by OECD members through both the Audit Committee and the Budget Committee. For OECD’s financial statements, visit the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development website.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: Audits are performed annually by both internal and external auditors, and the reports are reviewed by members through both the Audit Committee and the Budget Committee.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.16 Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: January 1, 1993

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OSCE is an obligation arising from Canada’s membership in what has become the world’s largest regional security organization, with 56 participating States from North America, Europe and Eurasia. Canada's contribution furthers its foreign policy goals related to human rights, fundamental freedoms, fragile states, democratization, conflict prevention, and post-conflict development. This is achieved by funding capacity-building programs implemented by the OSCE Secretariat, its three specialized Institutions, and its 16 Field Operations located in some of the more fragile states in the Balkans, Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia.

Canada’s OSCE contributions also include payments made to administer and implement two legally binding Conventional Arms Control regimes to which Canada is a State Party: the Treaty on Open Skies (for which Canada is a Treaty Co-Depository, together with Hungary) and the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE).

The OSCE is a primary regional instrument for early warning, conflict prevention, crisis management and post-conflict rehabilitation. In addition to its security and stability work, it provides a platform for treaty implementation for regional Conventional Arms Control and for confidence and security-building measures. The OSCE Parliamentary Assembly also provides the political impetus and leadership for extending democracy norms throughout the region.

The OSCE Unified Budget is approved by the OSCE Permanent Council by consensus on a yearly basis. It supports the programs and activities of the OSCE Secretariat (in Vienna); its Institutions (Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights in Warsaw; the High Commissioner on National Minorities in The Hague; and Representative on Freedom of the Media in Vienna); as well as its 16 Field Operations.

The OSCE’s governance mechanisms include internal and external oversight. Namely, the OSCE’s accounts are subject to an annual report by the External Auditor and by an independent Audit Committee, as well as by the OSCE Office of Internal Oversight. All three audit reports are made available to participating States.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Through its contribution to the OSCE Unified Budget, DFAIT has promoted within the OSCE the following results:

  • Effective and timely implementation of the decisions and commitments of the OSCE Permanent Council and Ministerial Council as shown by the Organization’s successful work and progress on such issues of importance to Canada as: election monitoring, democracy-building; good governance; tolerance and non-discrimination (including combatting anti-Semitism); safeguarding fundamental freedoms (including online and religious freedoms); combatting human trafficking; counterterrorism and extremism; as well as enhanced engagement with such key OSCE Partners as Afghanistan, Israel, Mongolia, and the countries of the Arab Awakening.
  • Continuous monitoring of the security and stability situation in Europe as shown by the OSCE’s regular reporting and early warning function provided by the Organization’s Centre for Conflict Prevention, its specialized Institutions, and its Field Operations. In this connection, the OSCE’s work and engagement in the region’s three protracted conflicts (i.e. Nagorno-Karabakh, Moldova-Transnistria, and Georgia’s secessionist regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia) contribute to promoting dialogue and lowering tensions.
  • Concerted programming to actively contribute to conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict institution building as shown by the successful implementation of the 2011 Vilnius Ministerial Decision, which strengthened the OSCE’s conflict prevention toolkit, especially in the key areas of early warning and mediation. In addition, the newly created Transnational Threats Unit consolidates and coordinates the OSCE’s work on counterterrorism, border security, policing and anti-trafficking.
  • Proper management of the organization's resources as shown by the favourable audit reports on the OSCE’s financial statements for 2011, by the renewed efforts of the OSCE Secretary-General to enhance the Organization’s accountability and transparency, and by the adoption by consensus in 2011 of a zero-nominal-growth Unified Budget for the third consecutive year.
  • Implementation of regional Conventional Arms Control Treaties and Confidence and Security-building Measures as shown by the continued engagement in Vienna by States Parties to the Conventional Armed Forces in Europe Treaty (CFE); the Open Skies Treaty; and the Vienna Document 2011 on modernizing and strengthening these regimes. These treaties have proven successful in building regional security, transparency, predictability, and trust through military-to-military contacts and cooperation.
Table 16: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions15.510.711.411.410.80.6
Total Program Activity(ies)15.510.711.411.410.80.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The OSCE budget is assessed in euros. Fluctuations in the exchange rate contributed to the variance between the planned spending and the actual spending. Unused funds are returned to Canada.

Audit Completed or Planned: The OSCE financial statements for the 2011 calendar year, as reviewed by the External Auditor, are available at OSCE 2011 Audited Financial Statements.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.17 Organization of American States

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization of American States (OAS) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: May 31, 1990

End Date: Ongoing

Description: To pay Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OAS, a Charter obligation of membership.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Strengthened the OAS as the key political forum through which Canada promoted its hemispheric interests, notably by supporting its effective implementation of a multiplicity of varied mandates, thus reinforcing the OAS’s continued relevance to its members;
  • Canada helped to promote and consolidate democracy, governance and the rule of law through the OAS, notably by co-sponsoring a General Assembly resolution and actively participating in OAS debates, including at the ministerial level, on the further implementation of the Inter-American Democratic Charter in its 10th anniversary year; by contributing (both financially and in kind) to several OAS electoral observation missions (e.g. the 2011 Guatemalan election) and to the OAS’s work to strengthen electoral institutions, notably through CIDA’s $5-million Hemispheric Electoral Assistance Initiative; by funding OAS work to modernize and integrate Haiti’s civil registry; and by advocating forcefully in defence of democracy at the OAS in connection with various challenges to democracy in the Hemisphere (e.g. the 2011 Nicaraguan election). Canada also helped strengthen human rights through the OAS by providing significant support, including financial, to inter-American human rights institutions to assist them in reducing their case backlogs and achieving greater financial sustainability;
  • Canada enhanced regional multilateral cooperation on security issues in the Americas through the OAS, notably through its ongoing support to OAS Good Offices and Monitoring Missions in Latin America, OAS mediation capacity development, OAS anti-drug and counterterrorism efforts through its CICTE and CICAD committees, OAS technical work to combat transnational organized crime and other conflict prevention and resolution efforts;
  • Canada contributed to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of the OAS through increased accountability and transparency, notably through its capacity-building work to modernize the OAS’s accounting procedures, to implement results-based management, financial management and oversight and to reform the OAS’s strategic planning process, the latter as chair of the OAS’s key Program Review working group.
Table 17: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions12.510.711.917.517.5-5.6
Total Program Activity(ies)12.510.711.917.517.5-5.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Canada’s quota assessment contribution is paid in U.S. dollars. The DFAIT Main Estimate on which the planned spending figure is based is set at a level that accommodates possible exchange rate differences and changes in the OAS’s annual program budget ceiling. The variance in planned spending figures for 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 reflects a consolidation and adjustment in the timing of Canada’s payment of its assessed contributions (previously made in two instalments and straddling several fiscal years) in order to account for an amendment to the OAS Prompt Payment Discount Policy. Canada adjusted its payment schedule for its 2012 (calendar year) OAS assessed contribution in order to continue maximizing its rebate, resulting (exceptionally) in $17.5 million in assessed contribution payments for the fiscal year in question. The variance between planned and actual spending in these tables for the OAS generally reflects currency fluctuations or overestimates of the increase in Canada’s assessed contribution.

Audit Completed or Planned: The OAS Board of External Auditors is an external audit committee charged with examining the accounts of the General Secretariat. It submits an annual report to the General Assembly, Annual Audit of Accounts and Financial Statements (PDF Version, 4.3 MB)*.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.18 Payments in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations’ Property in Canada

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations' Property in Canada (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: January 18, 1979

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations’ Property Grants Order (P.C.1979-59, January 18, 1979), the Municipal Grants Act, and successor Orders and Acts form the statutory basis relating to this program. The related memorandum of understanding between Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and Public Works and Government Services Canada, National Capital Area, establishes responsibilities and procedures governing the provision of services related to the payment of grants in lieu of real property and frontage or area taxes with respect to diplomatic and consular property. These procedures are designed to ensure fiscal and operational accountability, while promoting efficient program delivery.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Most favourable property tax exemptions conditions for Canadian missions abroad, as demonstrated by timely and accurate administration of payments to taxing authorities in Canada with respect to exempt properties owned by foreign states, in pursuance of Canada’s international commitments.
Table 18: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Grants12.712.613.513.513.40.1
Total Program Activity(ies)12.712.613.513.513.40.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The variance between the planned and actual spending is due to lower than anticipated municipal realty taxes. Changes in the volume and entitlement of grants also contributed to the year-end variance.

Audit Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.19 Projects and Development Activities Resulting from Francophonie Summits

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Projects and Development Activities Resulting from Francophonie Summits (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: March 9, 1979

End Date: Ongoing

Description: This fund provides funding to cooperation programs and activities undertaken by the International Organization of the Francophonie [Organisation internationale de la Francophonie] (OIF). It also provides financial support to the Government of New Brunswick to foster its participation in international Francophonie activities. This fund promotes Canadian interests and is consistent with the political and economic objectives that Canada has set for itself for the Francophonie. It also promotes active participation by the Government of New Brunswick in summits, ministerial conferences and other related Francophonie activities.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • The OIF is active in all the areas identified in the contribution agreement, in accordance with the overall guidance provided by OIF member states. Canada’s voluntary contribution is allocated to the Fonds multilatéral unique (FMU) that helps to implement the OIF’s program; support the Fonds francophone des Inforoutes; and support the activities of the Agence universitaire de la Francophonie. In 2011-12, Canada’s contribution also served to organize the Forum mondial de la langue française (July 2012).
  • The Government of New Brunswick actively participated in all significant activities of the OIF as shown by New Brunswick’s participation in the meetings of the OIF Commissions, the Permanent Councils of the Francophonie and the Ministerial Conference (December 2011). The Government of New Brunswick also participated to the Forum mondial de la langue française (July 2012).
Table 19: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions8.18.58.08.68.3-0.3
Total Program Activity(ies)8.18.58.08.68.3-0.3

Comment(s) on Variance(s): the "variance" represents a one-time transfer of $300,000 from PCH through Supps. C to cover some expenses incurred by the “Forum mondial de la langue française” which was held in July 2012.

Audit Completed or Planned: No audit was planned, nevertheless, the OIF engaged an auditing company to conduct an internal evaluation.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: To date, results of the internal evaluation have not yet been divulged to MIL/DFAIT.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: This is the responsibility of the OIF.

1.20 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: UNESCO was founded in 1945, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to UNESCO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to culture, science and education, and to provide the Government with a voice in the international community.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Universal primary education in all countries by 2015;
  • Gender disparities in primary and secondary education eliminated or greatly reduced in most member states;
  • Preparation, launch and implementation of a 10-year UN Literacy Decade and Plan of Action in order to reach the target of achieving a 50% improvement in levels of adult literacy by 2015;
  • Comprehensive and broad-based HIV/AIDS education and prevention campaigns conducted, particularly among the 15-24 age group in Africa and South Asia;
  • Impact of HIV/AIDS pandemic on educational capacities assessed;
  • Implementation of the Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions;
  • Implementation of the International Convention Against Doping in Sport;
  • Protection of world cultural and natural heritage sites through the implementation of the World Heritage Convention;
  • Increased scientific cooperation to improve management of global water resources;
  • Development of free, independent and pluralistic media.

For more details, visit the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization website.

Table 20: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions11.410.011.811.811.70.1
Total Program Activity(ies)11.410.011.811.811.70.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: UNESCO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: UNESCO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.21 United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Peacekeeping Operations (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: The UN was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to UN peacekeeping operations is a legally binding obligation of membership in the United Nations.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Enhanced peace and security for the countries and regions concerned;
  • Increased levels of security, basic services and governance provided in affected areas; and
  • Advanced prospects for peace and enabling reconstruction and development activities promoted.

For more details, visit the Department for Peacekeeping Operations website.

Table 21: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions236.2251.6271.5270.9227.444.1
Total Program Activity(ies)236.2251.6271.5270.9227.444.1

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: The UN Board of Auditors reviewed the operations and audited the accounts of UN peacekeeping operations for the period ended June 30, 2011, through visits to UN Headquarters and to 14 active field missions as well as via an examination of the accounts of 27 completed missions and four special purpose accounts.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: The UN Board of Auditors reviewed the operations and audited the accounts of UN peacekeeping operations for the period ended June 30, 2011, through visits to UN Headquarters and to 14 active field missions as well as via an examination of the accounts of 27 completed missions and four special purpose accounts.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.22 United Nations Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Organization (UN) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: The UN was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to the regular budget of the United Nations is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and to provide the Government with a voice in the international community. Assessed contributions are used to finance the organization's programs toward attainment of the UN's objectives, as set out in its Charter. For more details, visit the United Nations website.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved: Efforts to maintain international peace and security and promote sustained economic growth and sustainable development in accordance with the Millennium Development Goals. In particular:

  • Promotion of peace and security;
  • Progress in development, including progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals;
  • Promotion of human rights;
  • Effective coordination of humanitarian assistance efforts;
  • Promotion of justice and international law;
  • Progress toward disarmament;
  • International cooperation for drug control and crime prevention; and
  • International cooperation to combat terrorism.
Table 22: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions89.793.3118.1112.083.534.6
Total Program Activity(ies)89.793.3118.1112.083.534.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: The United Nations Board of Auditors (UNBOA) was established in 1946. For more than 60 years, the heads of the Supreme Audit Institutions from the UN Member States have provided independent, professional and quality audit services. The current UNBOA members are Mr. Terence Nombembe, Auditor General of the Republic of South Africa, Mr. Amyas Morse, Comptroller and Auditor General of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and Mr. Liu Jiayi, Auditor General of the People’s Republic of China. The published reports of the UNBOA are available on the UN’s website: United Nations Board of Auditors.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.23 World Health Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Health Organization (WHO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: The WHO was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada’s annual assessed contribution to the WHO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada’s foreign policy goals related to health and to provide the Government with a voice in the international community.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Enhanced global health security by maintaining a comprehensive outbreak alert and response mechanism supported by new international health regulations and by responding rapidly and effectively in crisis situations.
  • Accelerated progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals (reducing maternal mortality, improving child survival, addressing the global pandemics of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, promoting healthy environments, and increasing access to essential medicines);
  • Promotion of equity in health (strengthening health systems to reach the poor and disadvantaged); and
  • Ensured accountability (improving organizational effectiveness, transparency and accountability).

For more details, visit the World Health Organization website.

Table 23: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions14.614.715.815.815.20.6
Total Program Activity(ies)14.614.715.815.815.20.6

Comment(s) on Variance(s): Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: The WHO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.24 World Trade Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Trade Organization (WTO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament).

Start Date: January 1, 1995

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The purpose of this program is to pay the assessed contribution for Canada’s membership in the WTO.

The WTO provides the only multilateral forum for negotiating market access and other trade rules. It also provides the best forum for monitoring the implementation of obligations and commitments under various trade agreements, for reviewing members' trade policies and practices, and for discussing trade-related issues that inhibit the free, fair and predictable flow of trade.

The WTO is the only organization offering a state-to-state dispute settlement system whereby trade disputes are settled based on commonly agreed-on rules, rather than on political or economic power. Through these agreements, 155 WTO members operate a non-discriminatory trading system that makes clear their rights and obligations. Each country receives guarantees that its exports will be treated fairly and consistently in the markets of other countries. Each member country pledges to do likewise for imports into its own market as for exports out.

Strategic Outcome: CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Ensured that WTO agreements were being properly implemented, as shown by the continued work of the WTO councils and committees to monitor the implementation of agreements.
    • Canada participated in all standing and ad hoc meetings of the WTO in 2011-2012. These obligations included regular participation in General Council meetings; the Dispute Settlement Body; the Trade Policy Review Body; Senior Official Meetings; as well as numerous other councils, committees, working parties, and negotiating groups covering the wide range of WTO issues.
  • Provided a forum for multilateral trade negotiations, as shown by the release in April 2011 of a summary by the chairs of the negotiating groups and the Chair of the Trade Negotiations Committee; the May 2011 process aimed at delivering a smaller package by December 2011; the report by the Chair in October 2011 of the collective sense that members needed to explore different negotiating approaches; and the commitment by Ministers at the Eighth WTO Ministerial Conference in December 2011 to work actively toward a successful multilateral conclusion of the Doha Development Agenda.
    • While the Doha negotiations were at an impasse, Canada continued to work with other WTO members to find constructive ways to engage in multilateral discussions on issues facing the global trading system, both inside and outside the Doha Agenda, including at the Eighth WTO Ministerial Conference.
  • Conducted periodic reviews of WTO members’ trade policies and practices, notably the 17 Trade Policy Reviews that were conducted during FY 2011-2012 that included China and the European Union.
    • Canada participated in every Trade Policy Review that took place in 2011-2012.
  • Conducted further trade monitoring as shown by the release of four reports on global trade developments that were prepared by the WTO Secretariat during 2011.
    • Canada contributed to each of these reports.
  • Worked to settle disputes among members, through the Dispute Settlement Body, as shown by the adoption of 13 Panel reports and nine Appellate Body reports in 2011-2012, and the establishment of eight new panels during that same period.
    • Canada is one of the most active users of the dispute settlement system. During 2011-2012, Canada was active as a complainant in four cases against the United States, the European Union and Korea. Canada was a defendant in two cases brought by Japan and the European Union over Ontario’s feed-in tariff program. In addition, over the same period, Canada participated actively as a third party in 11 cases.
  • Built trade capacity for developing countries, as shown by the 267 technical assistance activities the WTO undertook in 2011 to help officials from developing countries gain a better understanding of the multilateral trading system and the completion of the Third Global Review of Aid for Trade that was held at the WTO in July 2011.
    • Canada is committed to the broader Aid for Trade agenda and provides extensive support to the Enhanced Integrated Framework, a multi-donor program that supports least-developed countries becoming more active players in the global trading system.
  • The WTO moved closer toward the goal of universality in membership, as shown by the conclusion of four accession processes in 2011 for Montenegro, the Russian Federation, Samoa and Vanuatu.
    • In 2011-12, Canada worked with other WTO members to make further progress on the accession of 26 Acceding Governments to the WTO, including Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Yemen. During that same period, Canada concluded bilateral market access negotiations with Serbia, the Republic of Seychelles and Tajikistan. Canada also worked with other members to develop recommendations to strengthen, streamline and put into operation the 2002 Least Developed Countries Accession Guidelines.

For more details, see the WTO’s 2012 Annual Report (PDF Version, 9 MB)*

Table 24: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total Contributions6.16.07.17.16.30.8
Total Program Activity(ies)6.16.07.17.16.30.8

Comment(s) on Variance(s): The assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of those negotiations. Members’ contributions to the WTO budget are based on their shares of world trade and as such can also be impacted by the accession of new members. Other factors include regular currency fluctuations.

Audit Completed or Planned: The WTO Committee on Budget, Finance and Administration produced the 2010 Financial Performance Report of the WTO for the financial year ended December 31, 2010. The statements therein were audited by external auditors appointed by the WTO General Council. [The 2011 report had not yet been issued at the time of this exercise.]

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

1.25 Afghanistan Counter-Narcotics Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Afghanistan Counter-Narcotics Program

Start Date: December 8, 2011

End Date: March 31, 2014

Description: Provision of assistance to enhance the capacity of states, government entities thereof and international organizations to secure a sustainable decrease in the cultivation, production, trafficking and consumption of illicit drugs.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

  • Improved capabilities of law enforcement agencies to undertake counter-narcotics operations resulting in increased seizures and arrests through the provision of training, mentoring and equipment; and
  • Increased capacity of beneficiary states to interdict precursor chemicals used in the production of heroin through the provision of training and equipment.
Table 25: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
Total GrantsN/AN/AN/A12.012.0N/A
Total ContributionsN/AN/AN/A12.012.0N/A
Total Program Activity(ies)N/AN/AN/A12.012.0N/A

Comment(s) on Variance(s): N/A

Audit Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluation Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Top of page

2.0 Greening Government Operations

2.1 Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target

Table 26: 8.6 By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Existence of implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally generated EEE.No. Expected completion date: March 2012Yes
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year.FY 2011-2012100%95%
FY 2012-2013100%N/A
FY 2013-2014100%N/A

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Definition of location: DFAIT offices within the National Capital Region. (In fiscal year 2011-2012, DFAIT will work to expand this target to its regional offices within Canada.)
  2. Number of locations within DFAIT: Seven locations in the National Capital Region.
  3. Implementation strategies:
    1. All National Capital Region DFAIT offices will return EEE to Distribution and Diplomatic Mail Services, Transportation and Warehousing, (AAGW), 125 Sussex Drive.
    2. Each returned item must be accompanied by a completed DFAIT EXT 369 Disposal Report Form that clearly identifies each unit as being in working or non-working order.
    3. A regular schedule for disposal of EEE will be established and circulated to all domestic offices.

2.2 Printing Unit Reduction Target

Table 27: 8.7 By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8 to 1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply targets where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configurations allow.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units in fiscal year 2010-2011, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configurations allow.3:1 
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configurations allow.FY 2011-20126:13:1
FY 2012-20138:1N/A
FY 2013-20148:1N/A

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Definition of printing units: The definition includes network printers, standalone printers and multifunctional devices attached to the departmental network.
  2. Scope: Includes all DFAIT locations within the National Capital Region.
  3. Method for determining the number of printing units: The number of printers was determined by identifying the number of active print queues on the network and tabulating the number of standalone printers acquired by manufacturer and model since 2005. The number excludes printers on the secure network.
  4. Method for determining the number of office employees: Human Resource Management System Business Intelligence Cube, which indicated 4,076 employees and 300 contractors (estimated) in the National Capital Region, for a total of 4,376 as of October 2010. Only employees within the National Capital Region were considered because they represent 99% of all departmental employees in Canada.
  5. Implementation strategies:
    1. Develop, under the authority of the Chief Information Officer, a DFAIT print device policy that establishes the 8 to 1 ratio for print devices (standalones, network printers and multifunction print devices) for all departmental locations in Canada. This policy will be implemented gradually through equipment attrition, cluster replacement with single units and elimination wherever possible of standalone printers.
    2. Establish a process or procedure that will facilitate the review of the business case for each request for a new or replacement print device. It will also address the upgrade, repair and relocation of existing and new print devices. The process will map the business case for any requirement that contravenes the print device ratio policy.
    3. Promote the removal and reduction in use of single-user standalone print devices where the business case is not warranted or supported.

2.3 Paper Consumption Target

Table 28: 8.8 By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline, for period between FY 2005-2006 and FY 2011-2012, along with applicable scope.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Number of sheets of internal office paper consumed per office employee in the baseline year selected, as per departmental scope.8,737 sheets per office employee in 2008-2009 
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption, expressed as a percentage, relative to the selected baseline year. (Optional for RPP 2011-12)FY 2011-201220% anticipated reduction28,324,000 sheets (increase of 5.49% from previous fiscal year.)
FY 2012-2013N/AN/A
FY 2013-2014N/AN/A

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Scope: Paper volume is the total volume of paper (all sizes and colours) used in printers and photocopiers on an annual basis in all DFAIT locations in the National Capital Region.
  2. Method used for determining paper consumption: Paper consumption is tracked by the Material Management group on an ongoing monthly basis. Paper usage in 2008-2009 in the National Capital Region amounted to 38,924,500 sheets.
  3. Method used for determining office employees: Human Resource Management System Business Intelligence Cube, which indicated 4,155 employees and 300 contractors (estimate) in the National Capital Region, for a total of 4,455 as of March 2009. Only employees within the National Capital Region were included because they represent 99% of all departmental employees in Canada.
  4. Implementation strategies:
    1. Promote awareness of “Green It” initiatives within DFAIT to reduce the Department’s environmental footprint.
    2. Implement double-sided printing as a default on all DFAIT network print devices.
  5. Target: From the baseline of FY 2008-2009 to FY 2011-2012, DFAIT reduced overall paper consumption by over 25%.

2.4 Green Meetings Target

Table 29: 8.9 By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a green guide for meetings.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Production of a green meeting guide.YesYes February 2012

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Endorse use of Environment Canada’s Green Meeting Guide. On February 15, 2012, a broadcast message was sent to all DFAIT employees in Canada as well as in DFAIT’s missions abroad strongly encouraging the use of Environment Canada’s 2011 Green Meeting Guide for meetings of all sizes. The message included a link to the Guide.
  2. Provide a link to this guide on DFAIT’s Sustainable Development intranet site. As of March 31, 2012, updates to the website were in progress but are expected to be completed by December 31, 2012.
  3. Scope of the Green Meeting Guide target: All meetings organized by DFAIT employees in Canada and abroad will be green.
    • Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Green = Achieved. Department has adopted the Green Meeting Guide.
    • Reporting requirement: DFAIT’s Corporate Services Branch is responsible for creating a strategy to implement the Guide and monitor its use.
    • Evidence that the guidelines were adopted: None to date.
    • Roles and responsibilities: DG of Corporate Services is target lead.
    • Key components: Planning, hospitality, accommodation, procurement.
    • Opportunities for continuous improvement: Among the known challenges DFAIT faces is the difficulty of monitoring the Guide’s use.
    • Timeline for evaluation: The effectiveness of the Guide will be evaluated in 2014.
    • Plans for engagement: A broadcast message was sent to all DFAIT employees in Canada as well as in DFAIT missions abroad strongly encouraging the use of Environment Canada’s 2011 Green Meeting Guide. The message also referenced future steps, including expansion of the VCNet systems and the implementation of a “think green” auto-response to electronic boardroom bookings.
    • Other: Embassy of Canada in Jakarta, Indonesia, has also provided an electronic copy of the Meeting Guide ecological ASEAN Secretariat for consideration.

2.5 Green Procurement Targets

8.10 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts.

Table 30: 1. By March 31, 2014, 95% of copy paper purchases contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and have Forest Stewardship Council certification or EcoLogo or equivalent certification.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Percentage (in dollar or volume) of paper purchases meeting the target relative to total amount (in dollar or volume) of all paper purchases in the given year.HQ: 95% Missions: 100% purchases from Canada for Missions
Progress against performance measure in the given fiscal year.95% 

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Specific: Presently, procurement through PWGSC standing offers stipulates paper with 30% post-consumer content. This paper has the FDL trademark (FDL = Fiber Diverted from Landfills) and is certified by BLI (Buyers Laboratory Inc.).
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the Material Management module of the Department’s financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Existing standing offers already meet target.
  4. Relevant: Products certified by Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) regularly procured.
  5. Time-bound: FSC feature is already available on the market.
  6. Other Considerations or Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new FSC products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.
Table 31: By March 31, 2014, 60% of purchases of chairs, cabinets, shelving, panels and desks will be environmentally preferred models.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Percentage (in dollar or volume) of furniture purchases meeting the target relative to total amount (in dollar or volume) of all furniture purchases in the given year.HQ: 95% Missions: 50% manufactures of SQ furniture
Progress against performance measure in the given fiscal year.60% 

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Specific: Presently procurement is through PWGSC standing offers.
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the Material Management module of the Department’s financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Existing standing offers already meet target, which is incorporated into technical requirements (if relevant) for the commodity to be procured.
  4. Relevant: Online ordering system (Shop@DFAIT) now identifies green products.
  5. Time-bound: These green products are becoming increasingly available on the market.
  6. Other Considerations or Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.
Table 32: 3. By March 31, 2014, 60% of purchases of copy paper, envelopes, notebooks, file folders, binders, writing instruments, toner cartridges and batteries will have environmentally friendly features.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Dollar value (or volume) of office supply purchases meeting the target relative to total dollar value (or volume) of all office supply purchases in the given year.HQ: 85% Missions: 70%. (Recycled toner cartridges are not easily transported to Missions.)
Progress against performance measure in the given fiscal year.60% 

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Specific: Purchases of copy paper, envelopes, notebooks, file folders and binders will contain recycled content or be derived from renewable resources.
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the Material Management module of the Department’s financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Existing standing offers already meet target, which is incorporated into technical requirements if relevant to the commodity to be procured.
  4. Relevant: Online ordering system (Shop@DFAIT) now identifies green products.
  5. Time-bound: These green products are becoming increasingly available on the market.
  6. Other Considerations or Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.

8.11 As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision making.

Table 33: Training for select employees. As of April 1, 2011, 90% of material managers and procurement personnel (including all PG classified employees, as well as employees identified as procurement and/or materiel management functional specialists) will receive green procurement training through CSPS course C215.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Number of procurement and materiel management staff with formal green procurement training relative to total number of procurement and materiel management staff.98%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.90% 

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Specific: Achievement level of 90%, type of employee, and type of training.
  2. Measurable: Information available from CSPS and in-house HR tracking system.
  3. Achievable: Departmental policy mandates all existing and new designated employees to take green procurement training.
  4. Relevant: Targets all relevant employees.
  5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.
  6. Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Methodology: See target wording.
    2. In-house training used: None-CSPS Course C215 only.
    3. Reporting requirements: Collect data from CSPS annually; HR maintains an up-to-date list of employees who have received or who need training.
    4. Roles and responsibilities: Director General, Corporate Operations Bureau (SPD), is the lead for procurement policy and community development.
    5. Opportunities for continuous improvement: Targeting 100% of employees is difficult due to turnover. However, in future years, acquisition card holders could also be targeted.
    6. Plans for engagement: Email dissemination of departmental policy mandating training.
Table 34: Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management. As of April 1, 2012, environmental considerations will be incorporated into the performance evaluations of all functional heads of procurement and materiel management.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Number of performance evaluations that incorporated environmental considerations, relative to total number of performance evaluations of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management.100%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.100% 

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Specific: Achievement level of 100% and type of employee.
  2. Measurable: Information available from in-house HR tracking system.
  3. Achievable: Departmental policy mandates that all existing and new functional heads of procurement and materiel management include environmental considerations in their performance evaluations.
  4. Relevant: Targets all relevant employees.
  5. Time-bound:Date established for target implementation and completion.
  6. Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Methodology: Directors General (DGs) and Directors of PG-classified employees and employees identified as procurement and/or materiel management functional specialists.
    2. Reporting requirements: DGs to report to target lead.
    3. Roles and responsibilities: DG Corporate Operations Bureau (SPD) is the lead for procurement policy and community development.
    4. Plans for engagement: Inclusion in Employee Performance Management Agreements.
Table 35: Management processes and controls. By March 31, 2013, all identified management processes and controls relating to procurement will have incorporated environmental considerations. The Procurement Modernization Initiative (PMI) that is currently underway incorporates Green Procurement processes. This exercise will identify any green procurement processes and controls that have been omitted and will address them accordingly.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Target Status 
Number of departmental procurement processes and controls that incorporate environmental considerations relative to total number of departmental procurement processes and controls that should address environmental considerations.90%
Progress against performance measure in the given fiscal year.70% 

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. Specific: Achievement level of all identified processes and controls.
  2. Measurable: Baseline set for all formalized management processes and controls.
  3. Achievable: Dedicated employees responsible for target.
  4. Relevant: Decision-making authority for purchases decentralized.
  5. Time-bound:Date established for target implementation and completion.
  6. Other Reporting Considerations:
    1. Methodology: Analysis of Department’s decision-making processes and controls to determine those that should include environmental considerations.
    2. Reporting requirements: DG to lead reports annually.
    3. Roles and responsibilities: DG Corporate Operations Bureau (SPD) is the lead for procurement policy and community development.
    4. Mechanisms to evaluate: First review scheduled in 2014.
    5. Plans for engagement: Discussion topic of Management Committee.

2.6 Reporting on the Purchase of Offset Credits

Table 36: Mandatory reporting on the purchase of greenhouse gas emissions offset credits, according to the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events.
Performance MeasureRPPDPR
Quantity of emissions offset in the given fiscal year. (Optional for all RPPs)To be determinedTo be determined

Strategies and/or Comments

  1. In keeping with its commitment to sustainable development goals, the Department will increase awareness of sound environmental, social and economic sustainability practices including waste minimization and management, pollution reduction and energy conservation. In progress.
  2. During the planning stage of major international events, DFAIT will make a commitment that the event will be carbon neutral. Being carbon neutral involves taking all reasonable measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to calculate the remaining emissions and then to mitigate those to zero by purchasing emission reduction credits or carbon offsets. DFAIT has not hosted/planned any major international events during this period.
  3. DFAIT will follow the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events. DFAIT has not hosted/planned any major international events during this period

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3.0 Horizontal Initiatives

3.1 Global Peace and Security Fund

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)

Name of Lead Department(s): Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start Date: October 2, 2005; made operational September 18, 2006

End Date: March 31, 2013

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $1,134.9 million

Description of the Horizontal Initiative (including funding agreement):

Sourced from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF funds the operations of the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) and is used to conduct international assistance programming in places affected by war, instability, or natural disasters, e.g. Afghanistan, Haiti and Sudan. START and the GPSF fill a policy, institutional, funding and programming gap between CIDA humanitarian and long-term development assistance and DND’s military and training assistance. START combines fast and flexible programming, specialized policy expertise, civilian deployment capacity and established whole-of-government crisis response coordination tools. In recent years, an increasing number of other government departments (OGDs) such as Public Safety Canada (PSC), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Correctional Service of Canada (CSC), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and Justice Canada have actively participated in stabilization and reconstruction initiatives as well as crisis response activities at the request of DFAIT’s START.

START programming provides timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges that implicate Canadian interests and reflect Canadian foreign policy priorities.

Shared Outcome(s): The ultimate shared outcome is peace, security, and the safety and well-being of those living in priority fragile or war-affected countries through effective stabilization and reconstruction programming. Specific expected results are:

  • Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations;
  • Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states;
  • Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations; and
  • Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations.

Governance Structure(s): The GPSF is managed by the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) in the context of a whole-of-government approach coordinated through the START Advisory Board. Led by the Director General of START and comprising senior officials from across government, the START Advisory Board is responsible for establishing, within the framework of individual departmental authorities, whole-of-government strategic policy as well as priority setting and direction with respect to fragile states and complex emergencies. It is also responsible for providing a platform for information exchange to ensure that program-related activities are complementary and avoid duplication.The START Secretariat is located in the International Security, Africa, Latin America and Caribbean Branch of DFAIT and is accountable to DFAIT, which is responsible for the financial, human and physical resource services for START.

Performance Highlights: Over the past year, Canada successfully ended its combat mission in Kandahar province, Afghanistan, and began a new engagement based in Kabul. START quickly and effectively re-aligned its resources to meet Canada’s new priorities to support security, the rule of law and human rights by deploying 45 police officers through the RCMP, two customs experts through CBSA, and one corrections officer through CSC to provide training and technical assistance to the Afghan National Police, the Afghan Ministry of Justice, and border and corrections officials.

In 2011-12, Canada also renewed its commitment to Sudan programming, which START supported through the deployment of 21 police officers to various UN projects and peacekeeping missions. Most Canadian officers were stationed in local police stations, providing on- The ground training and mentoring to South Sudanese police in an effort to enhance their operational capacity.

START also worked with the Haitian National Police, advancing security and the rule of law through training and technical assistance provided by 135 police officers. These deployments are possible because of the whole-of-government Civilian Deployment Framework that facilitates the implementation of Canada’s commitment to early and sustained engagement of civilian experts in the immediate aftermath of crises and post-conflict situations as affirmed by G-8 Leaders at the Muskoka Summit.

Table 37: Global Peace and Security Fund ($ millions)
Federal PartnersFederal Partner Program ActivityNames of Programs for Federal PartnersTotal Allocation (from start date to end date)Planned Spending for 2011-12Actual Spending for 2011-12Expected Results for 2011-12Results Achieved in 2011-12
* The planned spending figure of $114.3M excludes the frozen allotment of $9.4M. In the 2011-12 Report on Plans and Priorities, the DFAIT planned spending amount was incorrectly stated as $93.98M.
Note: Allocations from the GPSF are determined on an annual basis; therefore, there is no planned amount from the start to the end of the program.
DFAIT (lead)PA 1: International Policy Advice and Integration PA 2 Diplomacy and AdvocacyGlobal Peace and Security Fund (GPSF)See note at end of table.$114.30*$81.13Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations. Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations. Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations.Strengthened Canadian contribution to peace and security in fragile and war-affected countries through the deployment of five DFAIT program officers to Afghanistan, Haiti, and Sudan, which enhanced DFAIT’s ability to ensure accountability; by coordinating the interdepartmental implementation, and public reporting of Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security; by leading whole-of-government conflict analysis that informed Canada’s response to various crises, including in Libya; and by demonstrating international leadership in its rapid ability to coordinate whole-of-government responses to natural disasters and to address other crises.
Department of National Defence (DND)PA 2: Implement policies and programs to address international securityOperations in AfghanistanSee note at end of table.$0.00$0.14  
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)PA 2: Federal and International OperationsCanadian Police Arrangement and International Police Peacekeeping (IPP)See note at end of table.$25.11$26.48Improved security for people in places affected by war or instability through the deployment of police officers. In 2011-12, this included the deployment of up to 200 Canadian police officers to support peace operations in fragile states and added deployments to Guatemala to support the Police Reform Commission.Deployed an average of 230 police officers to 10 different international missions and police peacekeeping operations to promote the rule of law by providing mentoring, training, and advice, mainly in Haiti, Afghanistan and Sudan. Two police officers were deployed to Guatemala to support the Police Reform Commission in that country.
Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC)PA 2: Federal and International OperationsDelivery of international assistance under the CCC/DFAIT memorandum of understandingSee note at end of table.$8.50$0.81To reach 60% completion of the Haitian National Police headquarters ($4.5M) and 50% completion of the Fleet Management and Maintenance Centre ($4M).Efficient procurement of goods and services that enabled Canada to rapidly respond to crises and provide in-kind support to fragile states for reconstruction and stabilization initiatives. See note on variance
Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA)PA 2: Federal and International OperationsAfghanistan borderSee note at end of table.$0.00$0.086Deployment of CBSA officials to enhance border management in targeted areasDeployed two Canadian customs experts to provide technical expertise in customs matters and the flow of resources as part of the Afghanistan-Pakistan Cooperation Process.
Correctional Service Canada (CSC)PA 2: Federal and International OperationsOperations in Afghanistan and stabilization and reconstruction in HaitiSee note at end of table.$1.22$2.32Deployment of CSC officials to enhance prison reform in Haiti and AfghanistanDeployed one corrections officer to Afghanistan and18 corrections officers to the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) to provide mentoring, advice and training to managers and prison staff to assist in re-establishing a functional correctional system, including the overall restoration and maintenance of the rule of law and respect for international standards on human rights.
Total$1,134.9$149.13$110.97  

Comments on Variances: Variances are attributable to changes in operational requirements and delays in deployments due to the complexity of programming in fragile and conflict-affected situations.

Variances with respect to CCC-DFAIT projects are a result of delays in securing the release of necessary land from the Government of Haiti. Therefore, the two planned projects were cancelled: the construction of the Haitian National Police Headquarters and the Haitian National Police Fleet Management and Maintenance Centre.

Results Achieved by Non-Federal Partners (if applicable): N/A

Contact Information:

Marie Gervais-Vidricaire
Director General, START Secretariat
Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
Tel.: 613-665-6689
Fax: 613-944-5911
Email: Marie.Gervais-Vidricaire@international.gc.ca

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4.0 Internal Audits and Evaluations

4.1 Internal Audits (current reporting period)

Table 38: Internal Audits
1. Name of Internal Audit2. Audit Type3. Status4. Completion Date (DM Approval)
1 Audits started in 2010-11, carried over and completed in 2011-12
2 Audits recommended in the 2011-2012 Annual Plan
3 Review directed by the Departmental Audit Committee (DAC)
4 Audit work requested by Deputy Ministers.
Exceptional Contracting Authorities in Afghanistan1OperationalCompletedJuly 28, 2011
Global Commerce Support Program1Program (Transfer payments)CompletedOctober 24, 2011
Material Management1OperationalCompletedJuly 25, 2011
Real Property1OperationalCompletedJuly 25, 2011
Information Technology Security2OperationalIn progressReport on this audit will be presented to the Departmental Audit Committee (DAC) in September 2012.
Records Management2OperationalIn progressReport on this audit will be presented to the DAC in September 2012.
Voluntary Contributions to International Organizations2Transfer PaymentCompletedThe Canadian Assistance Envelope did not seek DM approval for this review. Further work on this audit is being carried out under the audit of Management of Transfer Payments.
Contract Management2OperationalCompletedMarch 28, 2012
Physical Security2OperationalThis audit is deferred and will be undertaken in 2012-13 under the title Mission Security.N/A
Management of Transfer Payments2Program (Transfer Payments)In progressReport on this audit will be presented to the DAC in September 2012.
Delegation of Authority2Financial ManagementThis audit was designated in the 2011/12 Plan as an "in-reserve." The audit has been deferred and is now planned for 2014-15.N/A
Strategic Use of Travel at DFAIT2OperationalThis audit was designated in the 2011-12 Plan as an "in-reserve" should additional audit resources become available.N/A
Second Follow-Up Audit of Resources Allocation2Financial ManagementIn progressEstimated completion date is August 2012.
Specified Procedures on Note 3: 2010-11 Financial Statements3Financial ManagementCompletedFebruary 3, 2012
Year-End Closing Procedures Related to the 2010-11 Financial Statements3Financial ManagementCompletedFebruary 3, 2012
Strategic Reductions Review: Implementation Update as of September 20114OperationalCompletedApril 2, 2012

4.2 Evaluations (current reporting period)

Table 39: Evaluations*
1. Name of Evaluation and Link to Report2. Program Activity3. Status4. Completion Date
*Inspection and Evaluation Reports
Evaluation of the Northern Dimensions FundDiplomacy and AdvocacyApprovedOctober 2011
Canada's Aid Support Network EvaluationDiplomacy and AdvocacyApprovedOctober 2011
Canada's Extended Continental Shelf Program EvaluationDiplomacy and AdvocacyApprovedOctober 2011
Protocol Visits and Events Management EvaluationDiplomacy and AdvocacyApprovedOctober 2011
Evaluation of Global Commerce StrategyInternational Policy Advice and IntegrationApprovedFebruary 2011
Evaluation of the Transformation AgendaInternal ServicesApprovedFebruary 2011
Evaluation of Canada's Grant to Host the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity Secretariat in MontréalDiplomacy and AdvocacyApprovedFebruary 2011
Horizontal Summative Evaluation of the Government of Canada's Investment in the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic GamesDiplomacy and AdvocacyApprovedFebruary 2011
Evaluation of the Canadian Police Agreement and the International Police Peacekeeping and Peace Operations ProgramDiplomacy and AdvocacyApprovedMarch 2012

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5.0 Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to parliamentary committees: N/A

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development): N/A

External audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages:

1. Audit of Staffing at Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada (by the Public Service Commission)

The Audit of Staffing at DFAIT was conducted in spring 2010. The final report was tabled in Parliament in October 2011.

The objectives of the audit were to determine whether DFAIT had put in place the appropriate framework, systems and practices to manage its appointment activities and to determine whether appointments and appointment processes complied with the Public Service Employment Act (PSEA), the Public Service Employment Regulations (PSER), and the Public Service Commission (PSC) Appointment Framework and other governing authorities.

The audit results showed that while many areas of DFAIT's appointment framework are in place, others need improvement. The PSC Audit of Staffing at DFAIT also confirmed sound management by the Department of its obligations under the PSEA, PSER, related departmental policies, and other governing authorities. The audit report recommended that DFAIT strengthen monitoring and control related to merit requirements and the appointment process.

To read the report and the Department's responses, visit PSC's website: Overall response from the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

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6.0 Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Table 40: Respendable Revenue
Program ActivityActual 2009-10Actual 2010-112011-12
Main EstimatesPlanned Revenue (RPP 11-12)Total Authorities Form D of Public AccountsActual Form D of Public Accounts
Diplomacy and Advocacy
International youth exchange8.58.012.012.013.010.0
International Commerce
Trade fairs and missions0.10.13.03.13.10
Consular Affairs
Specialized consular service fees3.83.64.34.34.33.5
Passport Canada
Passport fees290.8269.5283.7283.7283.7293.6
Canada's International Platform: Support at Headquarters
Training services5.56.4    
Real property services abroad0.40.1    
Telecommunications services0.53.8    
Canada's International Platform: Support at Missions Abroad
Real property services abroad (co-location)15.217.1    
Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Service Delivery
Real property services abroad (co-location)  20.720.724.021.3
Real Property services abroad  0.40.41.10.5
International Telecommunication Services  2.12.15.05.1
Training services by CFSI  6.56.58.06.0
Total Respendable Revenue324.8308.6332.7332.8342.2340.0
Table 41: Non-Respendable Revenue
Program ActivityActual 2009-10Actual 2010-112011-12
Planned RevenueActual
International Policy Advice and Integration
Adjustment to previous year's expenditures0.41.40.00.8
Diplomacy and Advocacy
Adjustment to previous year's expenditures2.67.00.04.8
International Commerce
Import and export permit fees8.36.82.62.5
Contributions repaid under the Program for Export Market Development0.10.10.60.0
Adjustment to previous year's expenditures1.60.90.01.1
Consular Affairs
Consular Services and Emergency Management97.688.893.297.5
Canada's International Platform: Support at Headquarters
Adjustment to previous year's expenditures3.31.6  
Canada's International Platform: Support at Missions Abroad
Sale of real properties13.113.3  
Employee rental shares18.419.7  
Services provided to Passport Canada4.44.4  
Adjustment to previous year's expenditures and other6.12.9  
Governance, Strategic and Common Service Delivery
Sales of real property  51.155.2
Employee rent shares  20.019.2
Services provided to the passport office  4.34.3
Adjustment to previous years expenditures  1.511.4
Total Non-Respendable Revenue155.9146.8173.3196.8

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7.0 Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

7.1 Centre for International Governance Innovation

Name of Recipient: Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

Start Date: January 30, 2003

End Date: Ongoing

Total Funding: $30 million

Description: CIGI supports world-leading research in the area of global governance, particularly global economic and financial governance, and furthers Canada's interest in having a stable and well-governed global economic system by bringing together academics, policy analysts and researchers from around the world to discuss and carry out research on current topics and trends. In 2003, the Government of Canada contributed $30 million, which was matched by CIGI and private donors, to establish an endowment fund. The Centre continues to be primarily funded by the proceeds of this endowment.

Strategic Outcome(s): CANADA'S INTERNATIONAL AGENDA—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Summary of Results Achieved by the Recipient: CIGI research focused on the global economy (including macro-economic coordination through forums such as the G-20, international financial regulation, international monetary reform, and China's emerging role in the global economy), as well as global security (including nuclear-industry regulation, security-sector reform, and regional security), global development (including the role of emerging economies as donors, the Millennium Development Goals, with a focus on Africa), and environment and energy (including sustainable economics as well as climate change). CIGI produced 76 publications, hosted 44 high-level conferences and public events on global governance issues and maintained its dynamic web presence at: Centre for International Governance Innovation.

CIGI partnered with DFAIT on a number of initiatives as part of the Department's open policy approach to engaging stakeholders to better inform Canada's international agenda. Collaborations included the inaugural meeting of the Constructive Powers Initiative in Istanbul and input by CIGI senior fellows to policy research on events in the Middle East and resource diplomacy. Throughout the reporting period, CIGI continued to implement its strategic plan, which was drafted following recommendations from an evaluation completed in 2008 and accepted in 2010. CIGI’s board announced the appointment of Rohinton Medhora as its new president in March 2012. The new president has signalled an intention to pursue ongoing efforts toward a long-term sustainability framework for CIGI’s program of work and its budget.

Table 42: Program Activity: Diplomacy and Advocacy
Actual Spending 2009-10Actual Spending 2010-11Planned Spending 2011-12Total Authorities 2011-12Actual Spending 2011-12Variance(s)
0.00.00.00.00.00.0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plans: The next evaluation is scheduled for calendar year 2013.

Significant Audit Findings by the Recipient During the Reporting Year and Future Plans: N/A

Link to recipient’s website: Centre for International Governance Innovation

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8.0 User Fees Reporting

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

8.1 Access to Information

User Fee: Access to Information Act (ATIA) fees

Fee Type: Other products and services

Fee-setting Authority: ATIA section 11 and section 7 of the Access to Information Regulations

Date Last Modified: ATIA section 11, last modified in 1992 (C-2, s.2)

Performance Standards: Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to ATIA section 9. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request.

For more information, visit the Access to Information Act website.

Performance Results: Statutory deadlines met 77.2% of the time.

Table 43: Access to Information (in thousands of dollars)
2011-12Planning years
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
10.09.43,879.12012-1310.05,876.0
2011-1210.05,876.0
2012-1310.05,876.0

Other Information: N/A

Table 44: External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)
External FeeService StandardPerformance ResultsStakeholder Consultation
Other Information: N/A
Fees charged for the processing of access requests filed under the Access to Information Act (ATIA) pursuant to the Access to Information Regulations.

Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the ATIA. Notice of extension to be sent within 30 days after receipt of request.

The Access to Information Act provides fuller details: (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/A-1/).

The Office of the Information Commissioner has, in the past, considered a performance rate of 85% as standard and 80% as failure.

Statutory deadlines met 77.2% of the time.The service standard is established by the Access to Information Act and the Access to Information Regulations. Consultations with stakeholders were undertaken by the Department of Justice and the Treasury Board Secretariat for amendments done in 1986 and 1992.

8.2 International Experience Canada

User Fee: Any national of a foreign state who applies to enter Canada under the International Experience Canada (IEC) shall, if the application is approved, pay a participation fee of $150.

Fee Type: Regulatory-Program Participation Fee (PPF)

Fee-setting Authority: Order JUS-609929 amending the Order in Council P.C. 2000-1723 of November 30, 2000, made pursuant to paragraph 19(1)(b) of the Financial Administration Act

Date Last Modified: October 3, 2007

Performance Standards: All routine IEC applications that are received at Canadian missions in participating countries are processed within eight weeks.

Performance Results: 98.7% of complete routine applications were processed within eight weeks from January 1st to December 31st 2011.

Table 45: International Experience Canada (in millions of dollars)
2011-12Planning years
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
*For fiscal year 2011-2012, we received an amount of 10,021 gross revenues. Of this amount, we reimbursed some participants for amount of $449,000 therefore, the net revenues total 9.572.
** Actual Revenues include revenues received from participation fees as well as the carry-forward from 09-10 FY of 2,787,069.
10.0*12.3**8.72012-1315.015.0
2013-1416.016.0
2014-1517.017.0

Other Information: N/A

Table 46: External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)
External FeeService StandardPerformance ResultsStakeholder Consultation
Other Information: N/A
Any national of a foreign state who applies to enter Canada under the International Experience Canada program shall, if the application is approved, pay a fee of $150.Routine IEC applications that are received at Canadian missions in participating countries are processed within eight weeks.98.7% of routine applications were processed within eight weeks from January 1st to December 31st, 2011.Consultations for the implementation of fees included direct communications and interviews conducted by Ipsos Reid with 25 stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, DFAIT, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), missions abroad and foreign government stakeholders. Overall stakeholder reaction was positive.

8.3 Export/Import Permit Fees

User Fee: Fees for the issuance of export and import certificates and permits

Fee Type: Other products and services

Fee-setting Authority: Export and Import Permits Act and Export and Import Permits and Certificates Fees Order

Date Last Modified: May 19, 1995

Performance Standards: Deliver non-routed import and export permits within 15 minutes of the time of application; process within four business hours permit applications that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers or that have been flagged for an officer's review by the applicant when no additional information or documentation is required.

Performance Results: 99% success rate on the processing of over 518,000 applications in fiscal year 2011-12.

Table 47: Export/Import Permit Fees (in millions of dollars)
2011-12Planning years
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
2.42.57.12012-132.57.1
2013-142.57.1
2014-152.57.1

Other Information: N/A

Table 48: External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)
External FeeService StandardPerformance ResultsStakeholder Consultation
Other Information: N/A
Fees for the issuance of export and import certificates and permitsDeliver non-routed import and export permits within 15 minutes of the time of application; process within four business hours permit applications that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers or that have been flagged for an officer's review by the applicant when no additional information or documentation is required.99% success rate on the processing of over 518,000 applications in fiscal year 2011-12.Stakeholder surveys were conducted with a few client groups in 2011-12. Similar surveys will continue to be conducted in 2012-13. In addition, the Department has consultative bodies to provide ongoing input on behalf of stakeholders with respect to certain trade controls, as well as regular outreach and specific consultations with associations and companies with respect to export controls for strategic goods.

8.4 Consular Services

User Fee: Consular Service Fee

Fee Type: Other products and services

Fee-Setting Authority: Consular Service Fee Regulations pursuant to the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Act

Date Last Modified: The Consular Service Fee was introduced on November 8, 1995, and has not been modified.

Performance Standards: Consular Services performance standards are grouped under the following service standards categories:

  1. Protection and Assistance
  2. Contact with Prisoners
  3. Passports and Citizenship
  4. Information—Canada/Third Countries
  5. Information—Local
  6. Legal and Notary

For more information, please go to Service Standards.

Consular services are provided to Canadians 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at more than 260 points of service around the world. Outside regular business hours, calls are forwarded to the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa. Emergency situations are dealt with immediately.

Every effort is made to obtain solutions for specific problems and to provide the required service. However, the department's ability to do so and its success are conditioned, in many instances, by the laws and regulations of other countries as well as the quality and level of cooperation offered by persons and organizations outside the Government of Canada.

Performance Results: Of the 3,947 Canadians who completed a Client Feedback Form in 2011-12, fully 94% said they were satisfied or very satisfied with the services received. The department also reports on performance against passport, citizenship and arrest/detention service standards. This information for 2011-12 is noted below.

Canada's missions abroad are asked to make regular contact with long-term Canadian detainees. The frequency of contact reflects local conditions: once every three months (e.g. in much of Latin America, Africa and Asia), once every six months (e.g. in much of Western Europe) or once every 12 months (e.g. in the United States, where over 70% of these detainees are located). As of March 31, 2012, missions met this standard 95% of the time.

Missions are asked to report on their ability to accept, review and forward citizenship applications to Canada within the 10-day service standard. During 2011-12, they did so successfully with 94% of the applications.

Missions are monitored on their ability to meet the 15-day service standard for passport issuance. They met this standard 96% of the time.

Table 49: Consular Services (in thousands of dollars)
2011-12Planning years
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
95,90097,50094,4002012-1398,60097,200
2013-1493,20098,800
2014-15103,100100,400

Other Information: N/A

Table 50: External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)
External FeeService StandardPerformance ResultsStakeholder Consultation
Consular Services Fee

Consular services are based on written service standards (established in 1995), which detail the services to be provided, along with qualitative and quantitative standards to be used by employees. The service standards are available at Service Standards as well as at all missions abroad, where they are either in public view or can be provided by employees.

Consular services are provided to Canadians 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at more than 260 points of service around the world. Outside regular business hours, calls are forwarded to the Emergency Operations Centre in Ottawa. Emergency situations are dealt with immediately.

See Performance Results above.The consular service standards were developed following consultations with Canadians at approximately 80 missions around the world as well as with selected clients in Canada. Surveys were also conducted at the international airports in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.

8.5 Specialized Consular Services

User Fee: Specialized Consular Services Fee

Fee Type: Other products and services

Fee-Setting Authority: Consular Fee (Specialized Services) Regulations, pursuant to paragraph 19 (1)(a) of the Financial Administration Act

Date Last Modified: June 3, 2010

Performance Standards: Specialized Consular Services performance standards are grouped under the following service standards categories:

  • Protection and Assistance
  • Legal and Notary

For the complete service standards list, please go to Service Standards.

Performance Results: Client feedback from 227 clients of legal and notary services demonstrated an overall satisfaction level of 94%.

Table 51: Specialized Consular Services (in thousands of dollars)
2011-12Planning years
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
3,7002,5003,8002012-134,3003,900
2013-144,3004,000
2014-154,3004,100

Other Information: N/A

Table 52: External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)
External FeeService StandardPerformance ResultsStakeholder Consultation
Other Information: N/A
Specialized Consular Services FeeThese standards are available at Service Standards and at all Canadian missions abroad. Clients are invited to comment if they did not receive the level of service they expected or if they wish to make suggestions.Client feedback from 227 clients of legal and notary services demonstrated an overall satisfaction level 94%.The consular service standards were developed following consultations with Canadians at approximately 80 missions around the world as well as with selected clients in Canada. Surveys were also conducted at the international airports in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.

8.6 Passport Canada

User Fee: Passport Canada

Fee Type: Other products and services

Fee-setting Authority: Passport Services Fees Regulations

Date Last Modified: December 10, 2001

Performance Standards: The standard turnaround times in business days are:

  • Offices: Regular services - 10
  • Offices: Urgent services - Next business day
  • Offices: Express services - 2 to 9
  • Mail-in: Regular services - 20
  • Receiving agent: Regular servicesm - 20

Performance Results: The agency issued 4,806,480 travel documents in 2011-12 and met its service commitments to Canadians in all areas of operations at a rate of 99% overall. Specifically, 99.7% of applications submitted by mail were processed within 20 working days, 98.1% of applications submitted in person were processed within 10 working days, and 99.8% of applications submitted through receiving agents were processed within 20 working days.

Table 53: Specialized Consular Services (in thousands of dollars)
2011-12Planning years
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
283,700293,600313,1002012-13301,900369,600
2013-14285,400285,400
2014-15315,600315,600

Other Information: N/A

Table 54: External Fees (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)
External FeeService StandardPerformance ResultsStakeholder Consultation
Other Information: N/A
Canada Revolving FundThe standard turnaround times in business days are:
  • Offices: Regular services - 10
  • Offices: Urgent services - Next business day
  • Offices: Express services - 2 to 9
  • Mail-in: Regular services - 20
  • Receiving agent: Regular servicesm - 20
In 2011-12, 99.7% of applications submitted by mail were processed within 20 working days, 98.1% of applications submitted in person were processed within 10 working days, and 99.8% of applications submitted through receiving agents were processed within 20 working days.N/A

8.7 User Fee Totals

Table 55: User Fee Totals (in thousands of dollars)
 2011-12Planning Years
Planned RevenueActual RevenueFull CostFiscal YearForecast RevenueEstimated Full Cost
*Regulatory User Fees include Passport Canada fees and International Experience Canada fees.
Subtotal Regulatory*296,700303,600325,5002012-13314,900382,600
2013-14299,400298,700
2014-15329,600329,200
Subtotal Other Products and Services102,010103,509109,2792012-13105,310114,076
2013-1499,910115,776
2014-15109,810115,250
Total398,710407,109434,7792012-13420,210496,676
2013-14399,310414,476
2014-15439,410444,450

 

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