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Canada's State of Trade Trade and Investment Update – 2009

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Figure 3.1 Canadian Real GDP Growth, 2004-2008

Figure 3-1 depicts Canadian Real GDP Growth, annual percentage change from 2004 to 2008 and quarterly annualized growth in each of the quarters of 2008. In 2004 Real GDP Growth was 3.1; in 2005 2.9; in 2006 3.1; in 2007 2.7, and in 2008 0.5 percent. In Q1 2008 quarter over quarter annualized economic growth was -0.9 percent, in Q2 2008 0.6, in Q3 2008 0.9 and in Q4 2008 -3.4 percent.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 3.2 Gross Domestic Product, Expenditure Based, 2004-2008 (Billions of Chained 2002 Dollars)

Figure 3.2 depicts various components of real (Chained 2002 Dollars) Gross Domestic Product (GDP), expenditure based, over the period 2004-2008 in billions of C$. Consumer expenditures on Goods and Services expanded from 698 in 2004 to 812 in 2007. Government expenditures on Goods and Services expanded from 268 in 2004 to 310 in 2008. Business expenditures expanded from 233 in 2004 to 282 in 2008, while Net exports gradually declined from positive 10 in 2004 to negative 89 in 2008.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 3.3 Real GDP Growth by Province, 2008

Figure 3.3 depicts Real GDP percentage Growth by Province in 2008. GDP growth for all of Canada was 0.5, for Newfoundland and Labrador -0.1, for Prince Edward Island 0.9, for Nova Scotia 2.0, for New Brunswick 0.0, for Quebec 1.0, for Ontario -0.4, for Manitoba 2.4, for Saskatchewan 4.4, for Alberta -0.2 and for British Columbia -0.3.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 3.4 Unemployment Rate in Canada, 2004-2008

Figure 3.4 depicts the Unemployment Rate (percent) in Canada for the period from 2004 to 2008. The unemployment rate was 7.2 in 2004, 6.8 in 2005, 6.3 in 2006, 6.0 in 2007 and 6.1 in 2008.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 3.5 Unemployment Rates in Canada and Provinces, 2007-2008

Figure 3.5 depicts the Unemployment Rates (percent) in Canada and Provinces year 2007 and 2008. The unemployment rate in Canada was 6.0 in 2007 and 6.1 in 2008, for Newfoundland and Labrador 13.6 in 2007 and 13.2 in 2008, for Prince Edward Island 10.3 in 2007 and 10.8 in 2008, for Nova Scotia 8.0 in 2007 and 7.7 in 2008, for New Brunswick 7.5 in 2007 and 8.6 in 2008, for Quebec 7.2 in 2007 and 7.2 in 2008, for Ontario 6.4 in 2007 and 6.5 in 2008, for Manitoba 4.4 in 2007 and 4.2 in 2008, for Saskatchewan 4.2 in 2007 and 4.1 in 2008, for Alberta 3.5 in 2007 and 3.6 in 2008 and for British Columbia 4.2 in 2007 and 4.6 in 2008.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 3.6 Exchange Rate Indexes (2002=100)

Figure 3.6 depicts Exchange Rate Indexes for the Canadian dollar, where the index is 100 for all exchange rates in the base year 2002. The index in for the US$ saw a continues increase to reach 147.3 in 2008, the British Pound saw a low of 98.9 in 2004 to later rise to 120.2 in 2008, the Euro fell to a low of 91.7 in 2004 to later rise to 95.1 in 2008, the Japanese YEN experienced a rise to reach 121.1 in 2008.

Source: Bank of Canada

Figure 3.7a Commodity Price and Exchange Rate Indexes (2002=100)

Figure 3.7a depicts annual Price and Exchange Rate Indexes, where all indexes equal 100 in the base year 2002, for the period from 1995 to 2008 The C$ exchange rate versus the US$ was 114.4 in 1995, gradually dropped to 100.0 in 2002 and later gradually increased to 147.1 in 2008. The commodity price index for all goods declined from 104.7 in 1995 to a low of 88.7 in 1998, but later increased to reach 245.6 in 2008. The commodity price index for energy rose from a low of 62.8 in 1995 to reach 333.5 in 2008. The commodity price index for industrial materials declined from 138.9 in 1995 to a low of 100.0 in 2002, but later increased to reach 188.5 in 2008.

Source: Bank of Canada

Figure 3.7b Monthly Commodity Price and Exchange Rate Indexes in 2008

Figure 3.7b depicts monthly Price and Exchange Rate Indexes, where all indexes equal 100 in the base year 2002, for 2008. The C$ exchange rate versus the US$ was 138.6 in January, but gradually dropped to 113.6 in December. The commodity price index for all goods rose from 230.7 in January to peak at 304.5 in June before falling back to 158.8 in December. The commodity price index for energy rose from 300.5 in January to peak at 435.2 in July before falling back to 176.8 in December. The commodity price index for industrial materials rose from 183.0 in January to peak at 205.4 in July before falling back to 153.8 in December.

Source: Bank of Canada

Figure 3.8 The Bank of Canada Key Policy Rate

Figure 3.8 depicts the Bank of Canada Key Policy Rate changes in 2008. The rate was 4.00 percent on January 22, lowered to 3.5 percent on March 4, lowered to 3.0 percent on April 22, lowered to 2.5 percent on October 8, lowered to 2.25 percent on October 21 and was again reduced to 1.5 percent on December 9.

Source: Bank of Canada

Figure 3.9 CPI and Core CPI, 2004 - 2008

Figure 3.9 depicts the annual percent increase in Consumer Price Index (CPI) and Core CPI from 2004 to 2008. The increase in theCPIwas 1.8 in 2004, 2.2 in 2005, 2.0 in 2006, 2.2 in 2007 and 2.3 in 2008. The increase in the CoreCPIwas 1.6 in 2004, 1.6 in 2005, 1.9 in 2006, 2.1 in 2007 and 1.7 in 2008.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 3.10 Provincial CPI

Figure 3.10 depicts the annual percent increase in Consumer Price Index (CPI) and in Canada and the provinces in 2008. Inflation, measured as annual percentage increase inCPI, was 2.3 in Canada, 2.9 in Newfoundland & Labrador, 3.4 in Prince Edward Island, 3.0 in Nova Scotia, 1.7 in New Brunswick, 2.1 in Quebec, 2.3 in Ontario, 2.3 in Manitoba, 3.3 in Saskatchewan, 3.1 in Alberta and 2.1 in British Columbia.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 4.1 Exports of Goods and Services by Major Area, 2003-2008

Figure 4.1 depicts Exports of Goods and Services to Major Areas from 2003 to 2008 in C$ billion. Exports to the World increased steadily from 461 in 2003 to 558 in 2008; exports to the US increased from 365 in 2003 to 406 in 2005, to drop to 398 in 2006, but rebounded to 407 in 2008; exports to the EU increased from 34 in 2003 to 53 in 2008; exports to Japan was 11 in 2003, and increased to 13 in 2008; exports to other areas gradually increased from 51 in 2003 to 85 in 2008.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 4.2 Imports of Goods and Services by Major Area, 2003-2008

Figure 4.2 depicts Imports of Goods and Services from Major Areas from 2003 to 2008 in C$ billion. Imports from the World increased steadily from 416 in 2003 to 533 in 2008; imports from the US gradually increased from 294 in 2003 to 332 in 2008; imports from the EU increased from 47 in 2003 to 62 in 2008; imports from Japan was 13 in 2003 and increased to 15 in 2007, but fell back to 14 in 2008; exports to other areas gradually increased from 72 in 2003 to 124 in 2008.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 4.3 Growth in Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by Major Area, 2008

Figure 4.3 depicts percentage Growth from the previous year in Canadian Exports and Imports of Goods and Services by Major Area in 2008. Exports to the World grew by 5.2 and imports expanded by 6.3; exports to the US grew by 3.8 while imports increased by 4.6; exports to the EU increased by 3.1 and imports expanded by 6.8; exports toJapan expanded by 16.5 while imports declined by 6.5; exports to other destinations increased by 12.1 and imports expanded by 13.0.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 4.4 Growth in Goods Exports by Major Groups, 2008 (annual percent change)

Figure 4.4 depicts Growth (annual percent change) in Goods Exports by Major Commodity Groups in 2008. Exports of Industrial goods and materials increased by 6.6 in value and declined by 1.5 in volume; exports of Agricultural and fish products expanded by 18.9 in value and 0.9 in volume; exports of Energy products increased by 37.2 in value and 0.8 in volume; exports of Other consumer goods decreased by 3.0 in value and 3.3 in volume; exports of Machinery and equipment decreased by 0.5 in value and 2.1 in volume; exports of Automotive products declined by 21.0 in value and by 23.4 in volume; exports of Forestry products declined by 12.3 in value and fell by 14.6 in volume.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 4.5 Growth in Goods Imports by Major Groups, 2008 (annual percent change)

Figure 4.5 depicts Growth (annual percent change) in Goods Imports by Major Commodity Groups in 2008. Imports of Agricultural and fish products increased by 11.8 in value and by 2.4 in volume; imports of Energy products increased by 44.9 in value and by 11.4 in volume; imports of Other consumer goods increased by 5.0 in value and by 2.8 in volume; imports of Machinery and equipment increased by 5.1 in value and by 4.1 in volume; imports of Industrial goods and materials increased by 7.6 by value, but fell by 2.7 in volume; imports of Automotive products decreased by 10.1 in both value and volume; imports of Forestry products declined by 4.2 in value and fell by 1.0 in volume.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 1: Foreign Affiliate Sales of Goods and Services

Figure 1 depicts Foreign Affiliate Sales of Goods and Services, in C$ billion, over the period from 1999 to 2006. Foreign affiliate sales of goods was 198.7 in 1999, sales of services 117.7 for a total of 316.4; in 2000 sales of goods was 226.7, services 140.4 for a total of 367.1; in 2001 sales of goods was 221.1, services 143.4 for a total of 364.6; in 2002 sales of goods was 219.1, services 135.5 for a total of 354.6; in 2003 sales of goods was 218.5, services 119.2 for a total of 337.8; in 2004 sales of goods was 249.9, services 131.3 for a total of 381.2; in 2005 sales of goods was 268.8, services 145.8 for a total of 414.7; in 2006 sales of goods was 288.1, services 153.0 for a total of 441.1.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 2: Foreign Affiliate Sales as Share of Total Exports (percent of Goods and Services Exports, 2006)

Figure 2 depicts Foreign Affiliate Sales as Share (percent) of Total (combined Goods and Services) Canadian Exports in 2006. This share was 84.7 for the World, 60.4 for the U.S., 192.9 for the EU, 101.5 for Other OECD countries and 177.0 for the non-OECD countries.

Source: Statistics Canada

The evolution of Canada's trade surplus

This figure depicts the evolution of Canada’s Trade Balance (in C$ billion) by Major Commodity Groups over the period from 1990 to 2008. The trade balance for Agricultural and fishing producst has remained positive over this period – from 4.2 in 1990 to reach 12.3 in 2008; the trade balance for Energy products gradually increased from 6.7 in 1990 to 55.1 in 2007 and 72.7 in 2008; the trade balance for Forestry products increased from 20.4 in 1990 to peak at 40.8 in 2000, while falling back to 22.8 in 2008; the trade balance for Industrial goods and materials was 4.3 in 1990, became negative in the period from 1997 to 2003 with a negative 8.0 in 2000, but has since rebounded to 19.3 in 2007 and 19.8 in 2008; the trade balance for Machinery and equipment has been negative for the entire period, ranging from negative 16.5 in 1990, negative 29.9 in 1999 and negative 29.6 in 2008; the trade balance for Automotive products was 4.2 in 1990, reached a peak at 17.9 in 1999, but subsequently declined to negative 2.7 in 2007 and a negative 10.9 in 2008; the trade balance for Other consumer goods has become increasingly negative over the entire period – from negative 13.2 in 1990 to negative 39.4 on 2008.

Source: Statistics Canada

Share of Canadian Trade with the U.S. that is Intra-Firm

This figure depicts the Share (percent) of Canadian Trade with the U.S. that was Intra-Firm over the period from 1990 to 2006. This share was 41.0 in 1990, 39.3 in 1995, 33.6 in 2000 and 28.7 in 2006.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Administration (BEA)

Canada - U.S. Intra-Firm Trade by Industry, 2006

This figure depicts the share ofCanada- U.S. Intra-Firm Trade (percent) by Industry in 2006. Transport equipment accounted for 46.8, Chemicals for 5.6, Machinery and electronics for 2.2, Other manufacturing for 17.8, Wholesale trade for 16.7 and All other industries for 6.5.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Administration (BEA)

Share of Trade with the U.S. that is Intra-Firm, 2006

This figure depicts the Share (percent) of Trade with theU.S.in 2006 that is Intra-Firm for various countries. This share was 89.1 forJapan, 66.3 forGermany, 52.2 for theU.K., 42.8 forFrance, 28.7 forCanadaand 21.1 for Italy.

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Administration (BEA)

Figure 5.1 Share of Merchandise Exports by Province

Figure 5.1 depicts percentage Share of Merchandise Exports by Province in 2008; Ontario 39.0,Alberta 22.9,Quebec 14.7,British Columbia 7.0,Saskatchewan 6.3 and Others 10.2.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 5.2 Share of Merchandise Imports by Province

Figure 5.2 depicts percentage Share of Merchandise Imports by Province in 2008; Ontario 55.8, Quebec 18.1, British Columbia 9.9, Alberta 5.1, Manitoba 3.5 and Others 7.6.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 6.1 Global Capital Inflows

Figure 6.1 depicts annual global capital inflows (direct and portfolio investments as well as other capital inflows in US$ billion) to the World and Developing countries over the period 1999 to 2007. World inflows were 1.95 in 1999, rose to 3.28 in 2000, but fell to 1.78 in 2002 before starting a continuous expansion to reach to 9.1 in 2007. Inflows into developing countries were 0.23 in 1999, increased to 0.76 in 2005, followed by a more rapid expansion to 1.92 in 2007.

Source: International Monetary Fund, IMF

Figure 6.2 Global Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows

Figure 6.2 depicts Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows to the world, developed and developing countries in US$ billion over the period from 1999 to 2008. In 1999, FDI inflows were 1,088.5 (of which 851.5 to developed and 237.0 to developing countries). Inflows expanded rapidly to reach 1,398.2 in 2000 (of which 1,134.6 to developed and 263.6 to developing countries), followed by a decline to 561.1 in 2003 (of which 361.1 to developed and 200.0 to developing countries). After several years of expansion FDI inflows reached a peak at 1,833.3 in 2007 (of which 1,247.6 to developed and 585.7 to developing countries), but fell back to 1,449.1 in 2009 (of which 840.1 to developed and 609.0 to developing countries).

Source: UNCTAD World Investment Report 2008

Figure 6.3 Mergers and Acquisitions Share of Global FDI Inflows (2008)

Figure 6.3 depicts the share of global FDI inflows in 2008 accounted for by Mergers and Acquisitions (81.7 percent) and Greenfield investments (18.3 percent) respectively.

Source: UNCTAD World Investment Report 2008

Figure 6.4 Global Direct Investment Outflows

Figure 6.4 depicts the average percentage share (over the period 2005 to 2007) of global Direct Investment Outflows accounted for by various geographic destinations. The EU accounted for 56.9, the US for 13.1, Canada for 2.9, Other developed economies for 11.0, China for 1.3, Transition economies for 2.1 and Other developing economies for 12.5.

Source: UNCTAD World Investment Report 2008

Figure 6.5 Canada’s inward and outward stocks of FDI

Figure 6.5 depicts the stock of Canadian outward and inward FDI, in C$ billion over the period from 1990 to 2008. In 1991 the Canadian outward FDI stock was 109.0 and 135.2 for the inward FDI stock. In 1996 the value of the outward FDI stock was 181.2 and 182.1 for the inward FDI stock. For the period following 1996 the outward FDI stock has exceeded inward FDI stock. In 2000 the value of the outward FDI stock was 356.5 and 319.1 for the inward FDI stock. In 2002, the outward FDI stock stood at 435.5 and inward FDI stock at 356.8. In 2008 the outward FDI stock was valued at 637.3, inward FDI stock at 504.9.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 6.6 Shares of the stock of FDI in Canada (2008)

Figure 6.6 depicts the respective percentage share of the inward FDI stock in Canadian 2008 by country or region of origin. The US accounted for 58.2 percent of inward FDI stock in Canadian 2008, UK for 10.8, Netherlands for 6.7, France for 3.7, Switzerland for 3.0, Japan for 2.6, Brazil for 2.4, Germany for 1.9, United Arab Emirates for 1.0, China for 0.5 and others for 9.3.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 6.7 Shares in CDIA (2008)

Figure 6.7 depicts the respective percentage share of the Canadian (outward) FDI stock abroad (CDIA) in 2008 by country or region of destination. The US accounted for 48.8 percent of CDIA in 2008, UK for 8.5, Barbados for 7.1, Bermuda for 3.5, Ireland for 3.2, Cayman Islands for 3.0, France for 2.9, Hungary for 1.7, Germany for 1.6 and others for 17.7.

Source: Statistics Canada

Figure 1. GDP per capita (PPP), 1980-2007

Figure 1 depicts GDP per capita on a Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) basis in constant 2005 intrenational $ for a number of countries over the period from 1980 to 2007. GDP per capita in Botswana expanded from 3,322 in 1980 to 12.664 in 2007, from 7,629 to 9.034 in Brazil, from 23,015 to 36,178 in Canada, from 525 to 5,046 in China, from 869 to 2,599 in India, from 18,644 to 31,607 in Japan, from 25,446 to 43,227 in the US, from 1,373 to 1,449 in Kenya and from 5,176 to 23,363 in South Korea.

Source: World Bank

Figure 2. Convergence in Population Growth 1990-2021

Figure 2 depicts annual actual and projected percentage population growth in various countries to illustrate a tendency to convergence. In the US the population grew by 1.2 in 1990, 1.0 in 2008 and is projected to grow by 0.9 in 2021; growth in Brazil was 1.7 in 1990, 1.3 in 2008 and is projected to grow by 0.8 in 2021; growth in Japan was 0.3 in 1990, 0.0 in 2008 and is projected to decline by 0.4 in 2021; growth in South Korea was 0.9 in 1990, 0.5 in 2008 and is projected to grow by 0.1 in 2021; growth in China was 1.4 in 1990, 0.5 in 2008 and is projected to grow by 0.3 in 2021; growth in India was 2.2 in 1990, 1.5 in 2008 and is projected to grow by 1.0 in 2021; growth in United Arab Emirates was 5.5 in 1990, 2.8 in 2008 and is projected to grow by 1.7 in 2021; growth in Nigeria was 2.9 in 1990, 2.3 in 2008 and is projected to grow by 1.7 in 2021.

Source: IHS Global Insight

Figure 3. Canadian shares of BRIC import markets

Figure 3 depicts the percentage share Canadian exports to the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China) accounts for in the respective country’s import market over the period from 1999 to 2007. Canada accounted for 2.0 percent of total imports into Brazil in 1999, but the share has been in decline to reach 1.4 in 2007. Canada accounted for 0.5 percent of total imports into Russia in 1999, comparable 0.7 in 2007. Canada accounted for 0.8 percent of total imports into India in 1999, and although reaching 1.0 in 2001 and 2002 was again 0.8 in 2007. Canada accounted for 1.4 percent of total imports into India in 1999, which rose to 1.7 in 2000 and 2001, but more recently fell back to 1.0 in 2006 and 1.2 in 2007.

Source: IHS Global Insight

Figure 4. Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) Canada-World (2006)

Figure 4 depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian World exports in 2006 by major sectors. In comparison to World imports from all countries, Canada over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food (+23.5), Metals & Minerals (+14.3), Energy (+202.9), Wood & paper (+223.5), Auto (+295.8) and Aero (+46.8) sectors, but under-performs (worse than average) in the Chemicals (-105.5), Machinery & electrical (-469.3) and Miscellanous manufactures (-232.0) sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Figure 5. Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) Canada-World excluding the US (2006)

Figure 5 depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to the World excluding the US in 2006 by major sectors. In comparison to World excluding US imports from all countries, Canada over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food (+66.7), Metals & Minerals (+53.9), Wood & paper (+62.8), and Aero (+41.9) sectors, but under-performs (worse than average) in the Energy (-79.1), Chemicals (-105.5), Machinery & electrical (-52.6), Auto (-27.8), and Miscellanous manufactures (-49.3) sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in China (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to China in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to China over-performs (better than average) in the Energy, Chemicals, Auto and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Agri-food, Wood & paper, Machinery & electrical and Aero sectors; and performs on par in the Metals & minerals sector.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in India (2007)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to India in 2007 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to India over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Chemicals, Machinery & electrical, Auto and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Energy, Wood & paper and Aero sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Indonesia (2007)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Indonesia in 2007 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Indonesia over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Chemicals, Machinery & electrical and Auto sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Wood & paper and Aero sectors; and performs on par in the Metals & minerals sector.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Malaysia (2007)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Malaysia in 2007 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Malaysia over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Chemicals, Auto and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Wood & paper, Machinery & electrical and Aero sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Mexico (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Mexico in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Mexico over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Chemicals and Auto sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Wood & paper, Machinery & electrical, Aero and Miscellanous manufactures sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Venezuela (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Venezuela in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Venezuela over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Auto and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Chemicals, Wood & paper, Machinery & electrical and Aero sectors; and performs on par in the XXX sector.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Brazil (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Brazil in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Brazil over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Metals & minerals, Chemicals, Auto, Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Energy, Wood & paper, Machinery & electrical and Aero sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Colombia (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Colombia in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Colombia over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Machinery & electrical, Auto and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Chemicals, Wood & paper and Aero sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Russia (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Russia in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Russia over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Machinery & electrical and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Chemicals, Wood & paper, Auto and Aero sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Turkey (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Turkey in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Turkey over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Machinery & electrical and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Chemicals, Wood & paper and Aero sectors; and performs on par in the Auto sector.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in South Africa (2008)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to South Africa in 2008 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to South Africa over-performs (better than average) in the Metals & minerals, Energy, Machinery & electrical, Auto and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Agri-food, Chemicals, Wood & paper and Aero sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Algeria (2007)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Algeria in 2007 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Algeria over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Machinery & electrical, Aero and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Chemicals, Wood & paper and Auto sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Eqypt (2008)

n/a

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in United Arab Emirates (UAE, 2006)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2006 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to UAE over-performs (better than average) in the Agri-food, Energy, Machinery & electrical and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Chemicals and Wood & paper sectors; and performs on par in the Auto and Aero sectors.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas

Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) in Saudi Arabia (2007)

The figure depicts Normalized Revealed Comparative Advantage (NRCA) for Canadian exports to Saudi Arabia in 2007 by major sectors. In comparison to Canadian export performance to the World excluding the US, Canadian exports to Saudi Arabia over-performs (better than average) in the Energy, Auto and Miscellanous manufactures sectors; under-performs (worse than average) in the Metals & minerals, Chemicals, Wood & paper, Machinery & electrical and Aero sectors; and performs on par in the Agri-food sector.

Sources: UN Comtrade database and World Trade Atlas


Figure 1 Growth in Number of Exporters in 2001-2006

Figure 1 depicts percentage growth in the number of exporters, by company size and destination, over the period from 2001 to 2006. The total number of exporters shipping to the US decreased by 15.5 – a decrease by 16.1 among Small and Medium sized exporters (SMEs and a decrease by 3.5 among large sized exporters. The total number of exporters shipping to Europe increased by 37.0 – an increase by 42.1 among SMEs and an increase by 8.5 among large sized exporters. The total number of exporters shipping to the Asia Pacific increased by 50.5 – an increase by 56.0 among SMEs and an increase by 21.2 among large sized exporters.

Source: Statistics Canada’s Exporter registry

Figure 2 Percentage Growth of Multi-product Exporters by Region of Destination 2001 to 2006

Figure 2 depicts percentage growth of multi-product exporters by region of destination over the period from 2001 to 2006. Although the number of multi-product exporters increased by 96 to Africa, by 45 to Asia Pacific, by 38 to Europe, by 71 to Latin America, by 69 to Middle East and by 102 to Oceania, these increases were more than offset by a decline by 13 percent to North America, resulting in an overall decline by 6 percent to all destinaions combined.

Source: Statistics Canada’s Exporter registry