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Inspection of the Embassy of Canada, Kuwait

April 18 - 23, 2013

Table of Contents

Inspection Scope and Objectives

The scope of the Inspection included a review of Mission Management and the Foreign Policy and Diplomacy Service, Commercial Economic, Consular and Common Services programs. The inspection objectives were to:

The focus and extent of on-site work was based on an assessment of materiality and related risk. This was done through communication with headquarters (HQ) bureaux, including briefings by line management and the functional bureaux, review of relevant HQ and mission documentation, past inspection findings, and an analysis of recurring trends and systemic issues.

During the inspection, inspection issues and lines of enquiry were further refined from information gathered through interviews with the HOM and program managers, a meeting with locally engaged staff (LES) representatives of the LES Management Consultation Board, individual interviews with staff, and results of other documentation reviewed. The level of inspection work was therefore based on issues and information identified and gathered at all levels: HQ, mission management and mission operations.

Executive Summary

An inspection of Mission Management, the Foreign Policy and Diplomacy Service (FPDS), Commercial Economic (CE), Consular and Common Services programs was conducted in Kuwait from April 18 to 23, 2013. A previous inspection of these programs took place in 2007.

The Embassy in Kuwait City, Kuwait, is a small mission with 4 Canada-based Staff (CBS) and 16 locally engaged staff (LES). It is responsible for departmental program delivery in Kuwait and the Commercial Economic (CE) and Consular programs have responsibility for Qatar. There are no partner departments or agencies co-located at the mission.

The mission is managed by an EX-01 in an EX-02 Head of Mission (HOM) position. The mission is generally providing good services to external and internal clients, but interpersonal conflicts and inappropriate behaviour deeply affects morale, teamwork and the overall atmosphere. There is a general CBS/LES divide and cliques have formed. Management has made some attempts to address these longstanding problems but the overall situation has improved little. In early 2012, the Office of Prevention and Conflict Resolution (DRC) visited the mission. Although the visit helped employees recognize the issues that were present, many people feel that there was insufficient action to bring about real change.

The missions' four CBS compose the Committee on Mission Management (CMM). Although the CMM provides a forum for each member to discuss his or her work, it is not consistently serving its role as an effective decision making body. Challenging issues, including addressing conflict and morale issues, have been repeatedly tabled and discussed at the CMM without leading to clear decisions. Minutes of the meetings are not distributed to all staff. Effective communication is at the heart of some of the conflict and interpersonal issues. Clear and consistent communication *** could help build a common sense of purpose, share expectations in terms of a healthy workplace and keep employees informed on key management decisions.

The mission's programs work together on important issues and share information appropriately. Although the HOM encourages a whole-of-government approach and makes the OR available to advance program objectives, the mission could do more to encourage planning from a whole-of-government perspective. As well, although the Economics and Finance Officer posted in Abu Dhabi is accredited to Kuwait***. The HOM has leveraged his position to facilitate the operations and work of personnel from the Department of National Defence that are present in Kuwait but not co-located.

As a small mission, some of the governance functions, which are routinely delegated to specific committees, are addressed by the CMM. The mission has an LES committee, and a recently formed LES Management Consultation Board (LESMCB), Contract Review Board (CRB) and Occupational Health and Safety Committee***. It would be appropriate for the HOM to lead the LESMCB meetings to try and build confidence in the Board.

Values and ethics concerns were raised by a large number of employees. There is concern among some that issues have harmed the reputation of the mission. Management has held all-staff meetings on values and ethics, but they have had little positive impact. It is recommended that management continue to educate employees on values and ethics, outline consequences for inappropriate behaviour and add values and ethics as an element to include in performance evaluations.

The mission has many of the core components related to emergency preparedness ***. Emergency preparedness training was held at the mission at the end of 2012, and the mission emergency plan (MEP) has been updated recently. A mission emergency response team has been identified***.

Some management controls are in place, but a number require attention. The most recent hospitality guidelines for example, date back to 2008-09 and were last reviewed by the CMM in 2011. As well, hospitality documentation is inconsistent. Some of the documentation reviewed did not fully communicate the purpose and value derived from the events undertaken.

The HOM dedicates about 20-30% of his time to the FPDS program. He is supported by a locally engaged Public Diplomacy Officer. The program is generally working well on a day-to-day basis. It monitors the media, reports on events, promotes a variety of mission activities, and develops messaging for speeches and media opportunities. The program could benefit from clear advocacy priorities that cover the mission's programs and partners with interests in Kuwait, such as DND. The absence of clear and measurable strategic objectives hampers effective performance measurement.

The Commercial Economic (CE) program in Kuwait is headed by an FS-03 Senior Trade Commissioner (STC). Overall, the program is functioning *** under the leadership of the STC. The program does not consult the HOM during the planning cycle. Doing so would allow the HOM to verify the priorities and overall approach, as well as identify how best to assist the program in achieving its goals. The role of the HOM should be included in the action plans wherever appropriate. In general, formal communication is taking place as required, but horizontal communication requires improvement. CEP plan objectives are appropriately reflected in individual's performance management tools and the program is delivering well on its plans and providing good service to clients both in Kuwait and Qatar. Program performance is also monitored on an ongoing basis and the STC uses TRIO reports to monitor progress.

The consular program is managed by the MCO with the support of two consular staff. The MCO is also providing consular services to Canadians in Qatar and visits every six weeks which has become a challenge to divide attention between the two sites. The MCO maintains an open door policy***. Regular meetings would help the program develop concrete objectives, plan for future activities and improve overall morale in the program. ***. Consular revenues are collected appropriately***.

The Common Services Program is managed by a non-rotational AS-03 (on his fifth assignment abroad) acting in the AS-05 MCO position. A significant portion of the MCO's time is spent managing a heavy consular workload, human resources and mission management issues. Overall, the CS program is managed on an informal and responsive basis. More *** management is hampered by interpersonal conflicts and communication issues within the program. In general, the program is functioning well enough and is providing an acceptable level of service to clients; however, there have been irritants with clients and staff on property and materiel related issues. There is room for improvement in a number of areas including communication within the section, formalizing processes and procedures, enhancing client service, and strengthening the involvement***. Pending completion of an assessment by headquarters, there is a possibility that the***. Overall, internal physical resources controls were found to be lacking and in need of improvement to reinforce processes***.

A total of 73 inspection recommendations are raised in the report, 69 are addressed to the mission and four are addressed to HQ. Management has responded to each recommendation indicating action already taken or decisions made, as well as future action. At the time of writing, management has stated that 56 had been implemented.

1 Mission Management

1.1 Overview

1.1.1 The Embassy in Kuwait City, Kuwait, is a small mission with 4 Canada-based Staff (CBS) and 16 locally engaged staff (LES). It is responsible for departmental program delivery in Kuwait and the Commercial Economic (CE) and Consular programs have responsibility for Qatar. There are no partner departments or agencies co-located at the mission.

1.1.2 The mission is managed by an EX-01 in an EX-02 Head of Mission (HOM) position. He is accountable for the overall operations and oversees the operational and capital budgets of $105,000 and $9,000 respectively. The mission also manages a property portfolio that includes a Crown-leased chancery, a Crown-leased official residence (OR) as well as three Crown-leased staff quarters (SQs).

1.1.3 Kuwait is a small but wealthy Arab state with a relatively open economy. Its democratic development and media freedom are considered relatively advanced for the region. Kuwait is a good partner for Canada in the promotion of democratic development, human rights including women's rights, the rule of law, media freedom and security. It also has potential to play a constructive role in regional issues, including the rise of democratic movements and the Middle East Peace Process, as well on issues relating to Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Yemen and Libya.

1.1.4 Kuwait holds about 10 percent of the world's crude oil reserves. Revenues from petroleum have fuelled a five-year, $100 billion National Development Plan, which presents significant opportunities for Canadian companies. In 2011, Canada established a military staging base in Kuwait to support the moving of equipment, material and personnel into and out of Afghanistan. There are approximately 10,000 Canadian citizens living in Kuwait.

1.2 Mission Management

Evaluation of Mission Management
Key Mission Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
The mission's strategic objectives are consistent with Government and DFAIT priorities and guide staff performance measurement objectives.X  
The Committee on Mission Management (CMM) is an effective forum to review and make decisions on mission policies and management issues. X 
Mission management ensures that employees remain informed of key priorities and common services policy decisions. X 
The Locally Engaged Staff Management Consultation Board (LESMCB) is representative of mission programs and employee levels, and is utilized by both LES and mission management to facilitate dialogue. X 
Mission committees are meeting regularly and effectively discharging their governance responsibilities. X 
Canadian public service values and ethics are promoted and reinforced, and employees are aware of available support resources (values and ethics, staff relations, etc.). X 

1.2.1 The mission is generally providing good services to external and internal clients, but interpersonal conflicts and inappropriate behaviour deeply affects morale, teamwork, and the overall atmosphere. There is a CBS/LES divide and employee cliques have formed. Since 2013, management has made attempts to address these longstanding problems but the overall situation has improved little.

1.2.2 In early 2012, the Office of Prevention and Conflict Resolution (DRC) visited the mission. Although the visit helped employees recognize the issues that were present, many people feel that there was insufficient action to bring about real change. For example, an all-staff retreat, which was recommended during the DRC visit, has yet to take place. Many employees, CBS and LES alike, conveyed *** to resolve the core issues. The continued involvement and support of Headquarters will likely be required.

1.2.3 The mission's strategic objectives are captured in the Mission Planning and Reporting (MPR) document. They are consistent with departmental and governmental priorities and draw upon diverse Canadian interests in the region. In light of the importance of the CE program to the mission, consideration could be given to elaborating on commercial interests and opportunities in both Kuwait and Qatar.

1.2.4 The missions' four CBS compose the Committee on Mission Management (CMM). Although the CMM provides a forum for each member to discuss his or her work, it is not consistently serving its role as an effective decision making body. Challenging issues, including addressing conflict and morale issues, have been repeatedly tabled and discussed at the CMM without leading to clear decisions. Minutes of the meetings are not distributed to all staff.

1.2.5 In general, mission management keeps employees informed of key priorities and common services policy decisions. However, the need for effective communication is at the heart of some of the conflict and interpersonal issues. As well, transparency could be improved throughout the mission. Consistently sharing minutes from the CMM would also help staff to better understand priorities and decisions. Clear and consistent communication *** could help build a common sense of purpose, share expectations in terms of a healthy workplace and keep employees informed on key management decisions.

1.2.6 As a small mission, some of the governance functions routinely delegated to specific committees are addressed by the CMM, such as security. The mission does have an LES committee, LES Management Consultation Board (LESMCB) and a Contract Review Board (CRB), which was recently developed. Although an Occupational Health and Safety Committee was formed recently, concerns were expressed by the mission that this committee may not meet as often as required unless something is done.

1.2.7 The LESMCB was formed recently, but a meeting with its full membership has yet to take place. Three LES representatives sit on the board; two are volunteers and one was elected. Although its mandate is generally understood, the LES are very sceptical of its role in facilitating meaningful dialogue with management and few were interested in serving as a representative. As well, the LES representatives that sit on the board ***. It would be appropriate for the HOM to lead the LESMCB meetings to try and build confidence in the Board.

1.2.8 Values and ethics concerns were raised by a large number of employees. Allegations included *** exclusion and inequity in the treatment of staff. There is also concern among some that these issues have harmed the reputation of the mission. Management has held all-staff meetings on values and ethics, but they have had little positive impact and were allegedly mocked by some employees. There is a need for management to continue to educate employees on values and ethics, outline consequences for inappropriate behaviour and add values and ethics as an element to include in performance evaluations.

1.3 Whole of Government

Evaluation of Whole-of-Government
Key Whole-of-Government CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Mechanisms are in place to ensure a whole-of-government approach is taken for mission and program planning. X 
Mission and program plans are implemented in a coordinated manner to ensure policy coherence and effectively leverage the Canadian presence.X  
Partner departments contribute to the overall effective governance of the mission and its operations.N/AN/AN/A
Common services are provided in line with the memorandum of understanding and any issues are addressed at CMM. X 

1.3.1 The mission's programs work together on important issues and share information appropriately. The HOM encourages a whole-of-government approach and makes the OR available to advance program objectives. He has also leveraged his position to facilitate the operations and work of personnel from National Defence and the Canadian Forces (DND) that are present in Kuwait but not co-located.

1.3.2 The mission could do more to encourage planning from a whole-of-government perspective. For instance, the MPR could identify more clearly how Kuwait works with the mission in Doha, Qatar. Planning would be facilitated by an agreement that spells out roles, responsibilities and service standards.

1.3.3 Although the Economics and Finance Officer posted in Abu Dhabi is accredited to Kuwait, ***. There is scope for the public affairs officer to be more involved with the Commercial Economic (CE) program at the planning phase, in order to better identify when their support would be of benefit to the program. A whole of government approach is shown with the review and comments on the mission emergency plan (MEP) by the Canadian Forces representative.

1.3.4 On a day-to-day basis, the programs work together as required. Public Affairs assists both the HOM and CE program in preparing speeches and working with media for major events. Citizenship and Immigration Canada, operating out of Abu Dhabi, similarly provides good service and works well with the mission in facilitating the local printing of visas for high-level contacts. *** also worked with the CE program to promote Canadian companies' capacity to meet Kuwait's requirements in purchasing ***.

1.4 Emergency Preparedness

Evaluation of Emergency Preparedness
Key Emergency Preparedness CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
The mission emergency plan (MEP) is up to date.X  
An emergency response team (ERT) has been identified and members are aware of their roles and responsibilities. X 
The MEP is tested regularly through the conduct of exercises and simulations. X 
The mission has identified an alternate command post and the appropriate secondary communications systems are in place and tested regularly. X 
Consultation occurs with like-minded and neighbouring Canadian missions regarding emergency planning.X  

1.4.1 The mission has many of the core components related to***. Emergency preparedness training was held at the mission at the end of 2012, and the MEP has been updated recently. Lessons learned from the training should, however, be incorporated into the MEP.

1.4.2 A mission emergency response team has been identified, ***. Considering this, roles and responsibilities should be reviewed ***.

1.4.3 ***.

1.5 Official Languages

Evaluation of Official Languages
Key Official Languages CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
The Official Languages Act is respected and promoted by mission management.X  
Mission signage is provided in both English and French and a bilingual Official Languages Co-ordinator has been appointed. X 
The mission has sufficient capacity to communicate with and provide services to the public, both orally and in writing, in both official languages.X  

1.5.1 Overall, the mission is meeting most criteria with respect to official languages. An official languages co-ordinator has been appointed and the majority of signage is bilingual. However, some important information, including fire orders and information on the verification documents is not available in French. Key services can be provided in both official languages, although there is limited backup in the Consular program.

1.6 Management Controls

Evaluation of Management Control
Key Management Control CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Security policies and regulations are respected and promoted. X 
Program managers are provided regular financial/budget updates to facilitate effective management and decision making.X  
Bank reconciliations are properly reviewed and signed-off on a monthly basis.X  
Mission hospitality guidelines are appropriate and reviewed annually by CMM. X 
Hospitality activities are properly documented, demonstrate value-for-money and align with mission objectives. X 
Mechanisms are in place to monitor the completion of employees' performance evaluations. X 
A coordinated approach is taken with regards to training and a budget has been established. X 
The quarterly reconciliation of passport inventory is properly completed and certified.X  
The Honorary Consul (HonCon) has an up-to-date mandate letter and performance is reviewed annually.N/AN/AN/A

1.6.1 Some management controls are in place, but a number require attention. Security policies and procedures should be reviewed with all staff to ensure their understanding. Not all employees have established objectives in the Performance Management Program (PMP) and had discussions with their supervisor. The mission does not take a coordinated approach to training, and a common training budget has not been established.

1.6.2 The hospitality guidelines provided to the inspection team were determined in fiscal year 2008-09 and were last reviewed by the CMM in 2011. As well, hospitality documentation is inconsistent. Some of the documentation reviewed did not fully communicate the purpose and value derived from the events undertaken. The recently published guide to hospitality could provide the mission further guidance.

1.6.3 Key high-level financial and passport controls are in place. Program managers receive regular financial/budget updates, and bank reconciliations are properly reviewed *** in the quarterly reconciliation of the passport inventory.

1.7 Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

1.7.1 Mission management should seek assistance from Headquarters to develop a plan to address ongoing interpersonal conflict, values and ethics concerns and disrespectful behaviour.

1.7.2 The CMM should be modified to follow an agenda and identify where decisions from management are required. All critical issues should be decided upon in a timely manner.

1.7.3 Unless security or other sensitive items are discussed, full minutes of the CMM should be taken and distributed to all staff in a timely manner.

1.7.4 The HOM should host an all-staff meeting to review the outcomes of the inspection and communicate next steps in implementing recommendations.

1.7.5 The mission should review the HOM Guide on Mission Governance and make any necessary changes to ensure it is appropriately meeting its governance obligations.

1.7.6 Formal meetings of the LESMCB should take place quarterly, with at least one meeting led by the HOM annually. Consideration should be given to rotating the LES representatives on an annual basis.

1.7.7 The values and ethics code should be redistributed to all staff. Employees should read the code and sign an attestation agreeing to abide by it.

1.7.8 Expectations on values and ethics should be incorporated into employees' PMPs.

1.7.9 The missions' planning documents should be developed in consultation with all stakeholders. The role of other missions and partners should be clearly identified in the documentation.

1.7.10 A memorandum of understanding should be established with the mission in Doha.

1.7.11 The following actions should be taken ***:

1.7.12 All key signage, including any emergency procedures, and information directed at the public should be posted in both official languages.

1.7.13 Security policies and procedures should be reviewed to ensure they are up to date, and all staff should be reminded of their responsibilities.

1.7.14 CMM should review the hospitality guidelines and ceilings annually.

1.7.15 All hospitality activities should be supported by documentation that outlines the purpose of the event, links it to mission priorities, evaluates its value-for-money and identifies any follow up that was taken or is required.

1.7.16 All employees should have a PMP in place and participate in formal performance discussions with their supervisor in accordance with the performance management cycle.

1.7.17 A formal all-of-mission training/learning plan should be developed and funds allocated accordingly .

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

1.7.1 At management's request, a team from the Centre for Intercultural Effectiveness Learning (CFSI) visited the Embassy for a week-long training session with both CBS and LES staff. The training was designed to address issues that arose in the Mission Inspection Report, were identified in a survey of staff, and/or had been identified by management. The training was well received and has improved the morale and communications in the Embassy. Additional vigilance by management and staff will be needed to prevent reversion to previous behaviours. Implemented November 2013.

1.7.2 A CMM agenda has been developed and is distributed in advance to participants. Decisions are taken in a timely manner. Implemented July 2013.

1.7.3 CMM minutes are circulated to all staff, except for items related to security or sensitive issues. Implemented June 2013.

1.7.4 An all staff meeting was held to discuss the results of the inspection and steps going forward. Implemented September 2013.

1.7.5 HOM guide reviewed and appropriate changes made to mission governance. Implemented October 2013.

1.7.6 LESMCB meetings are held quarterly and are chaired by the HOM/Chargé. Future meetings will be held at least quarterly and will be chaired by HOM. Consideration of new LES representative will be given in 2015. Implemented June 2013.

1.7.7 The values and ethics code has been redistributed and all employees have signed acknowledging they will agree to abide by it. Implemented September 2013.

1.7.8 All employees PMPs include a values and ethics objective. Implemented December 2013.

1.7.9 In the context of Strategia, the mission's planning documents were prepared in consultation with all relevant stakeholders. Implemented April 2014.

1.7.10 No MOU required as the Embassy in Doha has been staffed-up and the hand-over of most trade and consular functions was conducted smoothly and successfully in consultation with the Ambassador and his team. Implemented June 2014.

1.7.11 ***. In Progress for March 2015.

1.7.12 All key signage has been reviewed and is now posted in both official languages. Implemented January 2014.

1.7.13 Security policies have been reviewed and updated and discussed with relevant staff. Implemented February 2014.

1.7.14 Hospitality ceilings and policies reviewed. In May 2013 CMM endeavoured to establish hospitality rates by getting costs from various hotels in Kuwait. Rates will be re-established in September 2014. In Progress for September 2014.

1.7.15 Hospitality activities are documented and reviewed for consistency with policies. Supporting documentation/diaries outline purpose of event and link to mission priorities. Implemented for September 2013.

1.7.16 PMPs are in place for 2013-14 and all include an objective and performance indicators related to Values and Ethics, but are not yet completed. PMPs have been started for 2014-15. In Progress September 2014.

1.7.17 A formal all of mission training plan has yet to be developed, but learning activities are reviewed with staff as part of PMP process. Funds to be allocated as required. In Progress January 2015.

2 Foreign Policy and Diplomacy Service (FPDS)

2.1 Overview

2.1.1 The HOM dedicates about 20-30% of his time to the FPDS program. He is supported by a LE-07 Public Diplomacy Officer. The program's financial resources are provided below.

Program's Financial Resources
Budget2012-2013
Post Initiative Fund$3,000
Francophonie1,000
Total$4,000

2.2 Planning and Program Management

Evaluation of FPDS Program Management
Key FPDS Program Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
FPDS plans are aligned with the priorities and objectives outlined in the mission plan and informed by departmental and geographic bureau guidance and objectives. X 
FPDS plans outline intended outcomes and results are measurable. X 
Internal communications within the program effectively support program delivery. X 

2.2.1 The small FPDS program is active in a number of areas. The LE-07 officer carries out the majority of the program's support activities, and the HOM provides guidance on planning and setting of priorities. The program coordinates high-level visits, organizes public diplomacy events, promotes the activities of the mission, and undertakes media monitoring and reporting.

2.2.2 The program's advocacy and public affairs activities are planned in advance to try to maximize the use of its limited financial resources. The LE-07 consults her contacts in the region to determine if activities are taking place that would fall within mission's prime areas of interest. However, the program has not established measurable strategic objectives. As a result, it is more reactive than proactive. For example, the mission waits for other programs to develop their public diplomacy activities and then looks for opportunities to cooperate. Establishing broad objectives for the year would help guide the selection of activities as well as provide the public diplomacy officer with a greater sense of direction. Having concrete objectives would also enhance program performance measurement, allowing the mission to demonstrate the value derived from the resources used.

2.2.3 Communications between the HOM and the LE-07 are generally good. The two meet on a daily basis discuss short-term priorities and review media highlights. This represents a significant investment of time for the HOM. Consideration should be given to holding a formal meeting once a week with ad hoc meetings as required. Following an agenda during formal meetings could also help ensure that expectations and deadlines are clear.

2.3 Implementation

Evaluation of FPDS Implementation
Key FPDS Implementation CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
The program facilitates a mission-wide coordinated approach to advocacy and common messaging.X  
Program reporting is in line with mission and government objectives, timely and relevant.X  
Activities and initiatives are aligned with the mission's key priorities and with the principles of the New Way Forward FPDS Renewal initiative.X  
Relations with other mission programs facilitate program delivery (e.g. public affairs).X  
The program develops and maintains a contact base that meets program needs and objectives. X 

2.3.1 The program is generally working well on a day-to-day basis. It monitors the media, reports on events, promotes a variety of mission activities, and develops messaging for speeches and media opportunities. The program could benefit from clear advocacy priorities that cover the mission's programs and partners with interests in Kuwait, such as DND. This would also help add substance to speeches and opportunities for media exposure. Similarly, a reporting agreement with Headquarters could help the program to confirm what has the most value for stakeholders in Canada.

2.3.2 Media monitoring is an ongoing activity of the program. The public diplomacy officer monitors the media, informs the HOM on articles that relate to Canadian interests and prepares a bi-weekly media review. The summary is *** written ***. Adjusting to shorter summaries with links to more detailed articles could be a more efficient approach. As well, consideration should be given to working with other missions to monitor the news. This would help avoid redundancies in work and would also facilitate knowledge sharing and network building.

2.3.3 The public diplomacy officer has been allocated hospitality funds for outreach with like-minded missions. The money is used to improve the mission's network in targeted areas, such as on human rights. The mission's contact database is not up to date, but this has been recognized and plans are in place to improve it.

2.4 Performance Measurement

Evaluation of FPDS Performance Measurement
Key FPDS Performance Measurement CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
The program has an established performance measurement system in place to monitor activities towards the achievement of objectives. X 
The program assesses performance against strategies / objectives and plans, and provides a high-level assessment of performance through the Mission Planning and Reporting (MPR) system at the end of the fiscal year. X 
Hospitality diaries demonstrate value-for-money and alignment with priorities. X 

2.4.1 The absence of clear and measurable strategic objectives hampers effective performance measurement. Some reporting on results is done through the Mission Advocacy Activity Tracker (MAAT), but the value derived from the activity is not clearly communicated on a consistent basis. Individual performance is monitored, and the public diplomacy officer's PMP document is up to date.

2.4.2 The program could benefit from an annual review of its activities to determine which provided the greatest value and also capture lessons learned for future planning. Involving other stakeholders, such as members of the CE program, would be beneficial to evaluate the support provided.

2.4.3 As addressed under the Mission Management section of this report, hospitality diaries were not consistent in demonstrating value-for-money and alignment with priorities.

2.5 Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

2.5.1 The program should develop a workplan that outlines key activities and links human and financial resources to strategic and measurable objectives.

2.5.2 A weekly formal FPDS meeting should be established. It should follow an agenda and decisions should be clearly recorded.

2.5.3 A performance measurement system should be implemented to monitor activities on an ongoing basis and assess results against strategic objectives. Lessons learned should be captured and applied to future planning.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

2.5.1 A workplan for the coming year was developed as part of the Strategia planning system. Implemented March 2013.

2.5.2 Biweekly meetings of FPDS officer with HOM are held. The standing agenda includes a review of recent developments, plans for reports to Ottawa, preparation for upcoming events and visits, and other business such as MAAT reports, budgets, etc are discussed as needed. Key developments and decisions are conveyed to involved persons and groups. Implemented September 2013.

2.5.3 Each visit and event is assessed after it is held and lessons learned are applied to planning for future events and visits. Implemented September 2013.

3 Commercial Economic (CE)

3.1 Overview

3.1.1 The Commercial Economic (CE) program in Kuwait is headed by an FS-03 Senior Trade Commissioner (STC). The STC is supported by two LE-09 Trade Commissioners (TCs) and one LE-05 Trade Commissioner Assistant (TCA). The program covers both Kuwait and Qatar. Its financial resources are provided below.

Commercial Economic program financial resources
Budget2012-2013
Travel$7,000
Hospitality4,000
Client Service Fund (Kuwait)10,500
Client Service Fund (Qatar)4,300
Integrative Trade Strategies Fund (ITSF)2,500
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)1,500
Total$29,800

3.1.2 Kuwait's $100 billion National Development Plan has created opportunity for Canadian companies. Private sector focus on Kuwait has also increased recently as conditions in other Gulf and Middle Eastern markets have become less attractive. Opportunities in both exports and Foreign Direct Investment attraction exist in a number of sectors including health, education, oil and gas equipment/services, agrifood, defence products and building products/construction services.

3.2 Planning and Program Management

Evaluation of CE Program Management
Key CE Program Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Program objectives reflect departmental plans and priorities, including partner departments where applicable.X  
Performance targets are defined, clear and measurable. X 
Internal program communication effectively supports program delivery. X 

3.2.1 Overall, the program is functioning well. The STC is considered ***, even during periods of high activity or stress. She is *** when tasking staff and pays attention to planning as well as reviewing performance with individuals. She *** to mentor the TCs and is aware of a need to better calibrating objectives to the program's resources.

3.2.2 The CE team in Kuwait spends about 30% of its time, energy and resources on covering Qatar. Providing service there requires significant human and financial resources, which would otherwise be directed at program objectives in Kuwait. A separate Commercial Economic program plan (CEP plan) is developed for the program's responsibilities in Qatar. This helps to identify the resources required, outline the strategy and plans for proactive work and smooth handover once the mission in Qatar is fully operational.

3.2.3 The planning process begins with a CE retreat to discuss priorities. The entire team participates under the leadership of the STC. The approach is strategic and identifies areas of focus and potential emerging markets. This discussion helps shape the strategy that is drafted by the STC. The retreat is then followed by consultations with other programs at the mission, partner departments (AAFC, EDC), provinces, Headquarters and neighbouring missions in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) region as well as the Middle-East and North Africa (MENA) region. The program, however, does not consult the Head of Mission (HOM) during the planning cycle. Consulting the HOM during the planning cycle would allow the HOM to verify the priorities and overall approach, as well as identify how best to assist the program in achieving its goals. The role of the HOM should be included in the action plans wherever appropriate.

3.2.4 The STC has informally worked with the TCs to focus their efforts on one priority sector each year. This should be formalized in the CEP plan, reinforced with the officers and reflected in their PMPs. Limiting priority sectors is important considering the program's limited resources and the need for it to also provide service in Qatar. The STC's guidance in selecting the priority sector would help to ensure the program is focused on value-added work in areas that resonate with Canadian interests.

3.2.5 Attention should be paid to setting performance targets that are consistent with the program's capacity. For example, the targets for leads and economic outcomes facilitated and opportunities pursued are 82 and 28 respectively, which is far higher than what the program is achieving. The alignment to focus on priority sectors should be taken into account when setting the performance targets. Developing an action plan on outcalls could also better demonstrate how the program will develop leads.

3.2.6 In general, formal communication is taking place as required, but horizontal communication requires improvement. The STC meets the HOM weekly and holds program meetings twice per month. Although the program meetings are useful forums for information exchange, they do not follow an agenda and there is no record of decision. Information sharing across the members of the program is less consistent***. As a result, the STC spends significant time and energy transferring information among individuals, which takes time away from higher-value activities. Considering this, team meetings should be more frequent and the principal vehicle for information sharing. Similarly, objectives related to communication could be added to individuals' PMPs to improve practices among the entire team. The HOM Guide on Improving Internal Communications at Missions could provide some useful tips for the program.

3.2.7 The program would benefit from a review of roles and responsibilities. For instance, the role of the TCA was not well understood by all members of the team. As a result, there has been ***. As well, the TCA expressed some concern with respect to expectation outside of the CE program, such as providing backup support for the receptionist.

3.3 Implementation

Evaluation of CE Implementation
Key CE Implementation CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Business plan objectives and those outlined in management's Performance Management Agreements(PMAs) / Performance Management Programs(PMPs) appropriately cascade down into staff PMPs.X  
Activities and initiatives are aligned with the mission's key priorities.X  
TRIO use is monitored to ensure activities are reported appropriately and accurately reflect the work undertaken. X 
InfoCentre functions are assigned and facilitate program delivery.X  

3.3.1 The program is delivering well on its plans and providing good service to clients both in Kuwait and Qatar. In general, its activities are in line with sectoral and mission priorities, with a program that is driven mainly by large events and visiting delegations. It will be important that the program effectively communicate Kuwait's potential to stakeholders in Canada.

3.3.2 CEP plan objectives are appropriately reflected in individual's performance management tools. The STC's PMP objectives are shared with the members of the program. It shares the same priorities addressed in the HOM's Performance Management Agreement (PMA) and cascades down to the PMPs of other members of the team. Particular attention was paid to developing appropriate objectives and performance indicators for the officers.

3.3.3 The mission has been under utilizing TRIO. Entries have not been made for all outcalls (including HOM outcalls) and there is a tendency to provide the majority of input at the end of the fiscal year. The STC and the TCA attended TRIO 2.0 training in Abu Dhabi, which should position the program to increase both the quality and timeliness of its entries.

3.3.4 The InfoCentre functions are principally the responsibility of the TCA. She monitors the program's e-mail box and forwards requests to officers as required. She has also been assigned responsibility for reactive sectors that receive low volumes of client interest. When requests are sent, she works with the STC to identify what service should be provided. Overall, the program is meeting service standards.

3.4 Performance Measurement

Evaluation of CE Performance Measurement
Key CE Performance Measurement CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Tools and mechanisms are in place to measure and monitor performance of the program. X 
Program employees are involved in the performance measurement process.X  
Hospitality diaries are maintained in a fashion that demonstrates value-for-money and alignment with priorities. X 

3.4.1 Program performance is monitored on an ongoing basis. The STC uses TRIO reports to monitor progress and she has frequent discussions with officers about the value of activities and events. However, the importance of timely reporting in TRIO is necessary to accurately monitor performance. The STC would also benefit from printing a snapshot from the International Business Development (IBD) Dashboard system and comparing results to the TRIO reports to ensure that data is entered appropriately. The STC could use these tools as a basis to discuss results with staff at team meetings.

3.4.2 At the end of the fiscal year, a retreat is organized to review overall program results. Discussions take place on results with an emphasis on the quantitative performance indicators. The retreat could also be leveraged to discuss which activities and events were of highest value to clients and which were not effective use of resources. Lessons learned should be incorporated into the CEP planning process.

3.4.3 Individual performance is also monitored by the STC. All members of the team have a PMP document, and the STC initiates performance discussions in accordance with the performance management cycle. She also uses these opportunities to address development needs and tries to provide support when possible.

3.4.4 Hospitality diaries were generally well documented, but there is some room for improvement. The program should strengthen its documentation by providing a clear purpose for events, linking the events to the program strategies and providing an accurate evaluation of results. The evaluation of results should extend beyond an acknowledgement that all objectives were met. A good practice in reporting outcomes in the hospitality diaries is to link the event or activity to other tangible outcomes like event reports.

3.5 Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

3.5.1 The CE program should revisit their performance targets and ensure realistic targets are identified.

3.5.2 Team meetings should be held weekly and enhanced to include an agenda and record of decision. Whenever appropriate, work should be assigned during meetings to increase clarity with respect to responsibilities.

3.5.3 Communication objectives should be added to team members' PMPs to reinforce effective horizontal communication.

3.5.4 The STC should review roles and responsibilities with all members of the program and clarify the level of support that the TCA should provide to TCs.

3.5.5 The STC should monitor the use of TRIO and should ensure the quality and timeliness of the data entered in the system.

3.5.6 The STC should ensure that tools and mechanisms are in place in order to measure the performance of the program.

3.5.7 Documentation of hospitality diaries should be strengthened by providing a clear purpose for events, linking the events to the program strategies and providing an accurate evaluation of results.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

3.5.1 Performance targets for CEP Plan 2013-2014 were adjusted. In Strategia 2014-2015, realistic targets were established for all performance indicators including outcalls, SRs and success stories. Implemented February 2014.

3.5.2 Weekly Trade team meetings are held with an agenda and record of important decisions. When appropriate, work is assigned during the meetings and follow up on ongoing work assigned is sought. Implemented May 2013.

3.5.3 A specific communication objective will be added to all PMPs for 2014-2015. Effective Interactive Communication is one of the core competencies evaluated in the 2013-2014 PMPs and horizontal communication will be reviewed. In Progress for April 2014.

3.5.4 STC reviewed roles and responsibilities with team and shared job descriptions of TCA and TC with all team members. Implemented June 2013.

3.5.5 TRIO use has greatly improved and HOM outcalls, SR are now included in data entry by TCA. All TCs and TCA are improving the quality of data entered and improvements have been made to the timeliness of input. Implemented August 2013.

3.5.6 As part of preparation for Strategia 2014-2015 planning exercise, a robust review of events, missions and participation at trade shows took place to determine value and outputs. Importantly now that trade program in DOHA is up and running, KWAIT will focus on improving and expanding activities in the KWAIT market. Implemented March 2014.

3.5.7 Hospitality diaries have been improved with additional details being provided related to purpose of event and making the link to the program strategies and priorities clear. Results of events are documented in the diary. Implemented September 2013.

4 Consular

4.1 Overview

4.1.1 The consular program is managed by the MCO with the support of two consular staff. A consular officer responsible for cases and a consular assistant focusing on passport, citizenship and notary matters. The MCO is also providing consular services to Canadians in Qatar and visits every six weeks. This creates a certain burden on the MCO who divides his attention between the two sites.

4.1.2 The mission provides approximately 2,500 passport services and processes approximately 330 citizenship applications and a high volume of notarial requests yearly. There are 1,075 Canadian citizens in the Registration of Canadians Abroad (ROCA) database. The estimated number of Canadians residing in Kuwait is 10,000.

4.2 Planning and Program Management

Evaluation of Consular Program Management
Key Consular Program Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Mission consular plans and manuals are up to date. X 
Internal communications within the program effectively support program delivery. X 
The mission has ongoing dialogue with key local authorities to facilitate program delivery. X 
A warden network is in place and properly maintained. X 

4.2.1 The program is functional in that it provides timely services to clients but could benefit from strengthened processes to better manage resources and account for materials it manages. It should also look to improve processes to solicit feedback from clients.

4.2.2 The MCO maintains an open door policy ***. Regular meetings would help the program develop concrete objectives and plan for future activities.

4.2.3 Internal communications stand to be improved as communications currently only takes place on an ad hoc basis, to discuss specific arising issues with a lack of forward planning. Section staff expressed the desire for regular meetings and opportunities to discuss overall section plans.

4.2.4 Mission plans and manuals have not been fully reviewed recently and would benefit from a systematic review of content as well ensuring their direction meets current general consular planning requirements.

4.2.5 Mission communicates with local authorities as required but the program has not established a methodical approach to ensure that these communications allow for the advancement of the consular mandate.

4.2.6 The warden network is limited and activities to enlarge it are not scheduled. No clear strategy was in place to strengthen the network and is limited to being reactive.

4.2.7 The MCO is called upon to travel to DOHA mission to provide various consular services every 6 weeks. Given that an MCO position exists on site, it is unclear why the same services cannot be provided with DOHA's own resources. The MCO's frequent trips make it more challenging for him to focus on issues needing attention in KWAIT. While he offers *** notarial, case management and citizenship application services, he estimates that in total DOHA related activities, including travel time takes a significant amount of his time. An unofficial log kept by the MCO estimate that DOHA has roughly 35% of the KWAIT workload and that keeps him busy during his trip. DOHA cases are filled under KWAIT which makes it more difficult to track accurately the amount of work required to deliver its consular program

4.3 Client Service

Evaluation of Consular Client Service
Key Consular Client Service CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Services are provided to Canadians in the official language of their choice.X  
Service standards, fee schedules and a copy of an official receipt are posted in public areas in both official languages.  X
Services are provided in line with established standards.X  
Client feedback is reviewed and corrective action is taken when warranted. X 

4.3.1 The quality of client services is good with capacity to serve clients as needed in both official languages. Clients are received in a specific consular reception area where they can discuss personal matters.

4.3.2 While the level of attention to clients seemed appropriate at all times, some information is not made available to clients. Fees schedules and a copy of official receipts are not readily available to clients. This lack of information does not allow clients confirm they have made the right payments.

4.3.3 Client feedback forms, while available, are not fully used. Client feedback is not actively sought and the onus is on the client to print and bring in feedback forms, or to send them by email. This effectively reduces the possibilities of clients providing this feedback. The mission should consider pre-printing feedback forms and the installing a feedback box in the consular specific area to facilitate the process for clients.

4.4 Internal Controls

Evaluation of Consular Internal Control
Key Consular Internal Control CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
A certified CBS signs-off on all passports.X  
Client documents and personal information are properly stored and secured. X 
Procedures and practices related to the collection of revenues are appropriate. X 
Revenues held in the consular section are kept to a minimum and are transferred to finance on a regular basis. X 
Upon receipt of inventory two CBS verify the receipt of all assets, sign and return the transmittal note.  X
Inventory is appropriately secured and removal of assets is appropriately recorded. X 
Working inventories provided to staff are appropriate and controlled by a daily log. X 
Monthly and quarterly reconciliations of inventory are properly completed and certified. X 
Official seals and stamps are properly inventoried, secured and access provided to designated staff only.  X

4.4.1 Overall, controls on passport and consular activities were***.

4.4.2 Consular revenues are collected appropriately, ***.

4.4.3 Consular revenues are transferred***.

4.4.4 The inspection revealed cases of clients making payments when the section did not have the correct change for them, and they were not issued receipts. This creates a situation where clients would not have a means to identify the transaction***.

4.4.5 ***.

4.4.6 ***.

4.5 Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

4.5.1 The MCO should meet with consular staff on a regular basis to discuss program objectives, plans and procedures.

4.5.2 The program should develop an approach to improve the current warden network by developing a strategy for recruitment.

4.5.3 The *** should be modified in order to be *** to preserve clients privacy.

4.5.4 The program should develop various outreach activities to *** contact with *** Canadian community.

4.5.5 The MCO and another CBS should take receipt of all passport related inventories and do a full inventory of all materials received every time

4.5.6 Access *** should be limited to one staff to reinforce accountability and segregation of roles.

4.5.7 The program should only accept payments and issue official receipts for payments as they are received.

4.5.8 The MCO should issue official receipts to clients detailing individual consular services provided when in DOHA.

4.5.9 ***.

4.5.10 The program should acquire back-up equipment for its current items.

4.5.11 The mission should make client feedback forms readily available and easy to return.

4.5.12 *** should be developed and reconciled.

4.5.13 The program should seek confirmation from HQ to ensure various letters currently issued adhere to the consular mandate.

Recommendations to the Consular Operations Bureau (JND)

4.5.14 A separated account of KWAIT and DOHA consular activities should be monitored to assess real consular requirements of each mission separately.

4.5.15 Consideration should be given to assess resources allocated to DOHA to deliver various consular services without the intervention of the KWAIT MCO.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

4.5.1 Weekly consular team meetings are held and program objectives, plans and new procedures/directives are discussed. Implemented May 2014.

4.5.2 As a first step, mission will use the ROCA data base to approach potential individuals to see if they are interested in becoming a warden. In Progress for October 2014

4.5.3 The mission will contact our property portfolio manager in ARAK & RSCEMA Property section for a solution ***. In Progress for October 2014.

4.5.4 The Senior Consular Assistant has a well-developed network of local contacts including contacts at the MFA and Ministry of Interior (Moa). She is able to reach out to these authorities as required to assist Program delivery. Recent ship visits by DND and a Canada Day held in February 2014 also provide the MCO with the opportunity to expand his contacts, including those at the MFA & MoI as well as like-minded missions. The embassy uses the Canadians in Kuwait (CiK) and Canadian Commercial Circle (CCC) to foster relations with the Canadian community. Both of these organisations hold monthly socials and meetings at the embassy. Implemented May 2013

4.5.5 Passport stock sent from Headquarters is appropriately received and verified by two CBS. Implemented May 2013

4.5.6 The mission *** and only one *** has access at a time. There are two *** who cover off for each other and have access ***. LES staff have been reminded of safe keeping and handover procedures for consular revenue. Implemented May 2013

4.5.7 Both consular LES has been reminded to only accept payment at the time services have been rendered and not after. Mission uses a *** and a register receipt is issued indicating the service instead of an official receipt (EXT 25). Implemented April 2013.

4.5.8 Effective early March 2014 Doha became a full service mission and consular visits by the MCO from Kuwait are no longer required. However, official receipts were issued to clients for visits conducted in between April 2013 & January 2014. Implemented April 2013.

4.5.9 Effective May 18th, 2014 the embassy is only accepting payment by credit card for all consular services - hence eliminating the need for revenues to be transferred to the accounting section. Implemented May 2014.

4.5.10 Mission has recently received extra scanners specifically for the passport program which will serve as back-ups. There are also a couple of vacant workstations in the mission that can also function as back-ups. Implemented June 2014.

4.5.11 Feedback forms will be enclosed with passports etc., and forms will be made available in the reception area for walk-in clients. Consular staff will ensure all clients have access to feedback forms and will be encouraged to fill them out. To facilitate receipt, there is already a drop box in the consular waiting area which is controlled by the MCO. In Progress September 2014.

4.5.12 The mission has an inventory ***. Implemented May 2013.

4.5.13 The mission has already received feedback and confirmation from JPP on various consular letters requested by clients such as the MCC exam, driver's license and custodial authorisations for CIC. The mission will continue to consult with JPP as necessary. Implemented May 2013.

JND Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

4.5.14 KWAIT and DOHA's consular activities are now monitored separately through COSMOS. Implemented June 2014.

4.5.15 With the creation of the LES consular position in DOHA, KWAIT no longer has official responsibilities for consular in Qatar. Implemented June 2014.

5 Common Services

5.1 Overview

5.1.1 The Common Services (CS) Program is managed by a non-rotational AS-03 (on his fifth assignment abroad) acting in the AS-05 MCO position. He is supported by a team of seven LES.

5.1.2 The program is responsible for providing common services to 20 employees, spread over four DFAIT programs. The CS program covers Qatar and the mission provides consular services to Canadians in Doha. There are no partner programs in Kuwait.

5.1.3 A significant portion of the MCO's time is spent managing a heavy consular workload, human resources and mission management issues. For example, the MCO travels to Doha every six weeks to provide consular services to Canadians in Qatar; however, no Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) has been ever been drafted which would provide instructions to the mission. The provision of consular services in Doha is shared between the missions in Kuwait and Abu Dhabi.

5.1.4 The AS-02 Head of Mission (HOM) Assistant backs up the MCO during periods of his absence and, although she is able to sign bank transactions, she does not have financial signing authority under sections 34/33 of the Financial Administration Act (FAA) and is therefore unable to approve expenses related to the common services and consular programs.

5.1.5 Morale is affected by inherent intercultural issues and the need for a zero tolerance position on disrespectful behaviour in the workplace. Staff should review the Values and Ethics Code and acknowledge to mission management that they understand the principles and will comply with the requirements set out in the Code.

5.1.6 Although headquarters has not completed an assessment of mission finances, there is a possibility ***. The mission supports any decision to *** functions to ***.

Program Management

Evaluation of Common Services Program Management
Key Common Services Program Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
A Common Services Business Plan is in place and used to establish priorities and guide operations. X 
Common services policies and procedures are documented and communicated to management, staff and clients. X 
Internal communications within the program effectively support program delivery. X 

5.1.7 Overall, the CS program is managed on an informal and responsive basis. More effective management is hampered by interpersonal conflicts and communication issues within the program. In general, the program is providing an acceptable level of service to clients; however, there have been irritants with clients and staff on property and materiel related issues. There is room for improvement in a number of areas including communication within the section, formalizing processes and procedures, enhancing client service, and strengthening***.

5.1.8 There is a small staff complement within the CS program and as a result some employees are required to back each other up during absences. While staff is knowledgeable and competent in their respective fields, some issues have been noted regarding the degree of back up and support in the program. Although some employees are providing designated colleagues with handover notes in advance of an absence, it would be more efficient if all staff were taking the same course of action.

5.1.9 There is no roster in place to share back up when the receptionist is absent throughout the day. This mission wide duty should be shared among designated employees and instructions prepared to assist with general enquiries received on consular and visa matters.

5.1.10 ***. The MCO meets with common services and consular staff on an ad hoc basis and rarely *** with General Service employees including those at the OR. There is a need to conduct meetings on a regular basis to discuss forward planning issues, clarify any issues involving program delivery as well as cross-cutting to other sections within the program. Minutes should be taken at these meetings and circulated to all staff on a timely basis.

5.1.11 A Common Service Business Plan is in place; however, individual work plans have not been developed that would assist work flow and planning.

5.1.12 While there are some policies and procedures in place covering wireless devices and transportation, the program could be enhanced by developing additional policies and guidelines to be made available on a shared drive or the Wiki and communicated to clients and staff. This will strengthen client service delivery and will help to manage client expectations.

Client Service

Evaluation of Common Services Client Service
Key Common Services Client Service CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Service standards have been established and communicated to clients. X 
Services provided reflect fair and equitable allocation and access to common services for all mission programs.X  
A mechanism is in place to solicit and receive client feedback, and corrective action is taken when warranted.  X
Hub-and-spoke relationships are governed by an agreement outlining the roles and responsibilities of each mission.  X

5.1.13 Overall, some improvements can be made to improve the level of client service. Service standards have not been updated since 2009.

5.1.14 A formal client service feedback mechanism is not in place to assist the program in recognizing successes and to take corrective action when necessary.

5.1.15 There is no hub-and-spoke agreement between Kuwait and the mission in Doha, governing the provision of Consular services. Such an agreement could address issues raised in section 4.2.7 of this report.

Procurement and Contracting

Evaluation of Procurement and Contracting
Key Procurement and Contracting CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
A Contract Review Board (CRB) is in place and operating effectively with terms of reference. X 
Procurement and contracting procedures have been documented and communicated to all staff involved in the process.  X
Contracting files demonstrate compliance with policies and procedures.  X
A plan is in place for major acquisitions and is approved by CMM annually. X 

5.1.16 In general, contracting and procurement processes should be improved. The mission has only recently established a Contract Review Board (CRB) which is comprised of CMM members. This was done in order to review a proposed contract to refurbish an emergency exit; however, the Request for Proposal (RFP) was done through the Regional Service Centre Europe Middle East and Africa (RSCEMA). The mission has not developed Mission CRB Terms of Reference (TORs) to assist the CRB in performing this function.

5.1.17 The mission has hired *** but has not entered into a tender or bidding process therefore *** contract as per established contracting procedures.

5.1.18 The mission is not entering contractual information in the financial system IMS Enterprise, Materiel Management module in order to produce reliable and timely financial information to support effective decision making, accountability and transparency per the Treasury Board Contracting Policy.

5.1.19 Common services staff demonstrate a good understanding of procurement principles especially the requirement to obtain more than one quote, to obtain good value for money, to perform a price analysis of each purchase and to contact their colleagues in like-minded missions to compare the reliability of suppliers. There are not however, written procurement procedures nor are there any standing offer arrangements in place.

5.1.20 The Common Service plan covers multi-year replacement of official vehicles; however, it can be improved by reflecting planned purchases for furnishings and appliances

Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

5.1.21 Workplans should be developed for all sections within the program.

5.1.22 Policies and procedures should be developed or updated and made accessible to all staff.

5.1.23 The MCO should schedule regular, agenda-driven meetings with all office staff.

5.1.24 The mission should seek support from the Office of Prevention and Conflict Resolution in order to effectively manage workplace conflict.

5.1.25 The MCO should meet with all members of the program to review roles and clarify responsibilities to ensure there is a common understanding of requirements to cover absences in an effective manner.

5.1.26 The mission should create a duty roster to provide relief for the receptionist as necessary.

5.1.27 The MCO should schedule regular meetings with all staff and ensure that minutes are recorded, circulated and posted on a shared drive.

5.1.28 The mission should develop a consolidated work plan with staff assigned and deadlines assigned to each task in order to improve planning, organization and service delivery.

5.1.29 Policies and procedures should be developed or updated and made accessible to all staff.

5.1.30 Service standards should be updated and made accessible to all staff and clients.

5.1.31 A client service feedback system should be developed.

5.1.32 The mission should develop Terms of Reference to ensure effective management and oversight of procurement activities.

5.1.33 The mission should liaise with Contracting Policy, Monitoring and Operations Division (SPP)***.

5.1.34 In order to strengthen contracting and procurement procedures, the mission should document established policies and communicate instructions to staff involved in the procurement process.

5.1.35 The mission should develop a multi-year purchasing plan to cover all materiel including furnishings, appliances and office equipment.

Recommendations to the Consular Operations Bureau (JND)

5.1.36 JND should review the provision of consular services in Qatar and reassess the need to deploy additional resources at the mission in Doha.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

5.1.21 Workplans for coming year developed as part of Strategia planning system. Implemented April 2014.

5.1.22 As required policies and procedures have been developed and are on the missions "I" drive for staff to access. Implemented May 2013.

5.1.23 Staff meetings are held weekly with an agenda prepared in advance as required. Implemented May 2014.

5.1.24 The Centre for Intercultural Learning (CFSC) was contacted by mission management recently to assist us with managing workplace conflict and providing solutions. CFSC conducted an on-site Nov 17-20, 2013. Mission will continue to monitor workplace relations and will contact either the Office of Prevention and Conflict Resolution (DRC) or CFSC for further assistance as required. Implemented April 2012.

5.1.25 During weekly staff meetings upcoming absences are discussed so that staff members are aware and coverage can be implemented. The mission also uses a shared calendar in Outlook to record planned leave and all staff has access to the calendar. Implemented April 2014.

5.1.26 A roster has been recently developed and reviewed by the acting HOM. The mission will be communicating the roster to staff that will be filling in for the receptionist accordingly. In Progress for September 2014.

5.1.27 Weekly meetings are being held. The agenda includes a review of recent items, plans for implementing various works, and other business such as updating PRIME, reports, budgets, FINSTAT deadlines etc are discussed as needed. Main decisions are conveyed to involved persons and, programs. Implemented April 2014.

5.1.28 Kuwait is a small mission and all CS staff is aware of their roles and responsibilities. Deadlines are communicated and respected and the mission is using Strategia as part of our planning systems. Implemented April 2014.

5.1.29 As required policies and procedures have been developed and is on the mission's "I" drive for staff to access. Implemented April 2014.

5.1.30 The mission will update service standard using the generic DFATD template and communicate to all staff and clients. In Progress for December 2014.

5.1.31 The mission will consult with the functional experts at the RSCEMA and implement a client service feedback system. In Progress for December 2014.

5.1.32 Kuwait is a small mission and procurement activities are closely monitored by the MCO. Mission will consult with the functional experts at the RSCEMA for advice on creating TOR's. In Progress for November 2014.

5.1.33 The mission has already been communicating with SPP for guidance. In addition, we have contacted CSRA for assistance as well. Implemented April 2014.

5.1.34 The mission is following the lead of HQ and building on new contracting and procurement procedures. As well, current departmental processes and procedures were reviewed with and communicated to CS staff. Implemented April 2014

5.1.35 A plan including capital acquisitions will be developed in consultation with all PM's, and reviewed at CMM. In Progress for November 2014.

JND Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

5.1.36 A consular LES position was created in DOHA in order to provide full consular services for Qatar from DOHA directly. Implemented June 2014.

5.2 Human Resources

5.2.1 The human resources (HR) functions are the responsibility of the MCO, with assistance provided by the LE-05 Admin Assistant and the LE-07 Finance Officer. There has been little staffing activity in the past two years, apart from a currently ongoing competition to staff the passport examiner/consular assistant position (currently staffed on a term basis), and some emergency/temporary help. There have been no recent classification actions.

HR Management

Evaluation of HR Management
Key HR Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
A mission HR plan has been developed and submitted to headquartersX  
New LES are provided with an information package on the working conditions, benefits and regulations pertaining to employment at the mission.X  
Employee and position files are complete, maintained separately and properly secured. X 

5.2.2 Overall, the section is *** managed but some improvements are required in documenting staffing processes and procedures and in updating files.

5.2.3 The LES at the mission are predominantly expatriates. Given the challenging operational context, succession planning is a key concern. It will be important to maintain documentation of processes and enhance internal communications in order to ensure continuity of operations and mitigate potential loss of corporate knowledge.

5.2.4 Job descriptions are not up to date for all staff. These should be reviewed and updated as required so that duties are properly reflected in an employee's job description. The receptionist has never been given a job description and is unsure how much consular assistance should be provided. The admin assistant feels that 5% allocated for back up duties to the Office Manager and Receptionist does not accurately reflect actual work done.

5.2.5 PMPs are in place for most staff, however there is no regular discussion or feedback given to staff in the common services section

5.2.6 Orientation for new CBS and LES - Arrivals and departures checklists have been developed for CBS. All new staff are introduced to mission staff by the MCO or the Program Manager and briefed on mission services/procedures. LES are provided with a copy of the handbook, V&E upon employment. Checklists for new LES would assist with their orientation into the mission.

5.2.7 The MCO is the mission's Training Coordinator. Training needs are identified in the PMP and there is no budget established. The use of CFSI on-line training is encouraged and the mission actively pursues opportunities for staff to take training in Canada or regionally when possible. A mission-wide training plan would enhance management of training and facilitate budgeting as well as serve to coordinate and prioritize needs for all programs.

5.2.8 The mission maintains separate position, employee and competition files. The Administrative Assistant has started the process of reviewing and reorganizing all files and has developed a position checklist to assist with ensuring the appropriate documents are retained on file. Personnel files are retained in a ***. A review of a sample of files found that in general employee and position files contained key documents, however many were not up to date. Position files reviewed contained historical position information such as older job descriptions. Most files did not contain current job descriptions.

Internal Controls

Evaluation of HR Internal Control
Key HR Internal Control CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Staffing actions are conducted in line with the Locally Engaged Staff Services Bureau(ALD) guidelines. Written records supporting the process are maintained and contain required documents and approvals. Could Not Assess 
Letters of offer are signed by the appropriate authority and include the appropriate clauses (e.g. values and ethics, etc.). Could Not Assess 
LES accrued leave and deductions are recorded and the related liabilities are monitored.X  

5.2.9 Overall, HR processes and internal controls are generally in place but improvement is required to maintain written records to support staffing processes.

5.2.10 The inspection team was unable to provide an assessment of whether previous staffing actions have been conducted in accordance with ALD guidelines as only the working file for the current ongoing competition was provided for review.The mission recently started working with the RSCEMA on the staffing of the passport examiner/consular assistant position, and documents maintained on file seem to indicate that the process will be conducted in accordance with ALD guidelines.Letters of Offer which had been signed by the HOM are maintained on the personnel file. The ALD checklist for staffing should be used to ensure that appropriate records are maintained.

5.2.11 LES leave is monitored and an excel spreadsheet is maintained by the Finance Officer. Program Managers and LES are provided balances at the beginning of the month and on request. Program Managers are also provided with monthly leave summaries

Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

5.2.12 The mission should ensure that there is a process to periodically verify that position files are up-to-date.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

5.2.12 The mission has verified that position files are up to date and will continue to review files on an annual basis. Implemented May 2015

5.3 Physical Resources

5.3.1 The physical resources functions at the mission are the responsibility of the MCO who is assisted by an LE-06 Office Manager. The chancery occupies a large four storey building located in a residential area. This residential area leaves the mission separated from the main hubs of the city and causes limited visibility of the mission location.

5.3.2 The mission has downsized over the years and the structure is now too large for its current size. The mission itself requires now only half the space of the building. The building is in need of various work and doesn't meet some essential requirements. The section also manages an official residence and three SQs as well as a fleet of three vehicles. Work requests are received via email and are low in volume and complexity.

Management

Evaluation of Physical Resources Management
Key Physical Resources Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Mission property and maintenance plans are up to date.X  
The chancery and official residence (OR) are well maintained and maintenance schedules are in place. X 
An efficient process in place for receiving, processing and monitoring work orders.X  
Annual inspections are conducted to assess the state of staff quarters(SQs) and input into maintenance and acquisition planning. X 

5.3.3 The management of physical resources is good but improvements could be made in order to deliver services more efficiently and for internal processes to function better. The MCO has an open door policy ***. Meetings benefit the program by ensuring a platform exists to discuss on going or upcoming issues and plans.

5.3.4 The chancery's maintenance has been a challenge given its size and the large number of works that need to be conducted to ensure it meets established guidelines. The current team and its budget do not seem to have the capacity to maintain all aspects of the building. The building design, in part, makes it more difficult to meet requirements such as having two means of egress on each floor. Correcting this issue is beyond the regular work expected from the section.

5.3.5 A review of the chancery, its size and layout would contribute in assessing the best course of action***. Previous recommendations were made***. The office manager has to be involved in a number of processes and can not necessarily be available to address recommendations made in past assessments of the premises.

5.3.6 Work requests are sent to the office manager who ensures action is taken by delegating most tasks to the handyman and cleaner. Requests are addressed in a timely manner and clients did not report any significant delays in service delivery.

No formal process is in place to ensure that annual inspections of staff quarters are conducted, but visits occur within the context of repairs by the officer manager.

Key Processes and Internal Controls

Evaluation of Physical Resources Internal Control
Key Physical Resources Internal Control CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
An inspection is conducted by new SQ occupants and a mission representative within 30 days of occupancy, after which occupancy agreements and distribution accounts are signed. X 
Records of assets located in the chancery, OR and SQs, as well as those in storage, are maintained on an ongoing basis and verified annually. Assets are appropriately safeguarded and controlled. X 
Disposals are appropriately authorized and follow departmental guidelines.  X
Vehicle logs and fuel purchases are verified against consumption (e.g. mileage/usage rates for vehicles and generators).  X

5.3.7 Overall, internal controls were found to be lacking and in need of improvement to reinforce processes and internal controls. No scheduled inspection of SQs within 30 days of a new occupant's arrival takes place. This could be part of a workplan for the section to identify recurring activities and assign responsibilities.

5.3.8 The tracking of assets was found to be insufficient with***. Review of a past disposal sales of assets***, raised concerns as to the lack of controls in place, *** bidding on various items. Such practice is against regulations. To avoid any recurrence, it is important for the MCO to be involved in the process.

5.3.9 The inspection team were made aware of complaints from one CBS staff member, indicating that there was a lack of bookcases for SQs. During the disposal sale noted above, almost all the mission's bookcases were sold. This demonstrates the need ***, in order to ensure such practices do not occur again.

5.3.10 Vehicle logs and resulting gas consumption ***. A monthly review of vehicle logs would assist in ensuring vehicles use is appropriate, and gas consumption is according to specifications.

Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

5.3.11 The MCO should schedule regular meetings with staff to plan section activities.

5.3.12 The individuals responsible for a disposal of assets sale should not be allowed to bid on items for sale

5.3.13 The section should ensure it has a working inventory of assets to ensure items needed are not sold off.

5.3.14 Sales of assets should be open to the public to ensure maximum revenues from the sales.

5.3.15 The section should review vehicle logs to ensure fuel consumption is appropriate.

Recommendation to the Physical Resources Bureau (ARD)

5.3.16 ARD should assess whether *** feasible.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

5.3.11 Weekly team meetings are held and program objectives, plans and new procedures/directives are discussed. Implemented May 2014.

5.3.12 Ensuring that individuals responsible for the disposal of assets sale not be allowed to bid on items for sale is being strictly enforced. Implemented May 2013.

5.3.13 An Inventory list of assets has been prepared and was updated during the implementation of the RFID project. Implemented May 2014.

5.3.14 The last three disposals of surplus assets, including two vehicles have been opened to the public. Implemented May 2013.

5.3.15 Vehicle logs will be reviewed for fuel consumption usage. In Progress for November 2014.

ARD Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

5.3.16 A Bureau Project Committee mandate was approved to retain a third party to examine ***. The Report will be used to guide consultations with the GeoGroup on receipt. In Progress for November 2014.

5.4 Finance

5.4.1 The finance functions are undertaken by *** LE-07 Finance Officer (FO) under the responsibility of the MCO.

5.4.2 There is a possibility***; however, headquarters has not yet completed an assessment of the situation. In the meantime, the MCO has met with *** representative to discuss *** options in the event the ***.

Management

Evaluation of Finance Management
Key Finance Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Roles and responsibilities ensure adequate segregation of duties.X  
The section employs methods to minimize disruption (e.g. setting of "quiet hours" and controlling access to the finance section).X  
The section has explored alternate methods to minimize transactions and reduce reliance on cash (i.e. acquisition cards, electronic fund transfers).X  
Payment runs are kept to a minimum, but are sufficient to provide good client service.X  

5.4.3 The MCO is an active IMS user and enters the system to review a report or monitor transactions on a regular basis. The Office Manager (OM) has been trained to provide urgent assistance on a limited basis during periods of absence; however, there is no formal back-up system in place.

5.4.4 Program managers are provided with updates of budgets and program expenditures on a regular basis and financial statistics (FINSTAT) is presented and discussed at CMM on a monthly basis

5.4.5 This small mission processes a low volume of financial transactions, therefore there are no quiet hours scheduled during the course of the work day and the FO is available to assist staff as required.

5.4.6 The mission has ***. These are distributed ***. Logs are maintained and completed in an accurate manner and on a timely basis. Purchases are appropriately authorized by the MCO.

5.4.7 The mission is not using the Materiel Management module of IMS. The MCO was informed of observations made by Special Investigation Division (ZIU) and Contracting Policy, Monitoring and Operations Division (SPP) on this issue.

Key Processes and Internal Controls

Evaluation of Finance Internal Control
Key Finance Internal Control CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Financial signing authorities are exercised by individuals who possess the appropriate delegation of authority. X 
The asset and liability report is reviewed on a monthly basis. X 
A CBS receives the original monthly bank statement directly from the bank and reviews it prior to giving it to the accountant.  X
Revenues are deposited into the mission bank account daily, or if not cost effective, within a week of receipt, per the Financial Administration Act: Receipt and Deposit of Public Money Regulations. X 
Official receipts are provided to clients at the time of payment and to internal staff when funds are transferred (i.e. from Consular to Finance). X 
Reconciliations of any funds transferred within the mission are conducted in the presence of two staff.X  
Travel and hospitality claim processes ensure that policies and guidelines are adhered to and that the completeness and accuracy of the claim is verified. X 
Reimbursement of HonCon operational expenses is based on an established agreement. N/A 
A percentage of costs for personal use of OR supplies is determined and regular reimbursements are made to the mission.X  
A process is in place to ensure that, where applicable, CBS reimburse the mission for any services of a personal nature received at their staff quarters (e.g. television, internet, telephone, etc.).X  

5.4.8 Overall, processes and controls need improvement ***. There are no documented procedures in place for staff to follow. These would help guide staff and clients on processes such as the completion of travel and hospitality claims.

5.4.9 There are only three Canada-based officers with signing authority which can be difficult to manage due to absences. The HOM Assistant acts as a back up to the MCO during periods of his absence; however, she does not have financial signing authority delegated under the Financial Administration Act. She is also unable to sign bank documents.

5.4.10 ***. International Financial Operations Division (SMFF) has a requirement that funds be transferred ***.

5.4.11 The MCO visits Doha, Qatar on a regular basis to perform a limited number of consular services for which clients pay using bank drafts addressed to the Receiver General of Canada. The MCO collects the bank drafts for return to the FO in Kuwait ***.

5.4.12 Hospitality rates and ceilings were last updated in 2009.

5.4.13 Although the MCO has provided staff with instructions to properly complete travel claims, inconsistencies were noted in the application of exchange rates and a lack of supporting documentation (such as travel authority and advance forms).

5.4.14 There is a system in place to ensure Canada-based staff reimburse personal phone calls, cable and internet costs.

5.4.15 During the inspection, petty cash *** was counted and verified. All was in order. Petty cash records are maintained in an accurate manner using a spreadsheet detailing expenses and EXT forms when cash is transferred to another employee during periods of absences. Periodically, the MCO conducts random spot checks.

Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

5.4.16 The mission should identify a back-up to the FO and provide training to the employee as necessary.

5.4.17 The mission should consider registering the HOM Assistant to take financial delegation training in order to be able to sign documents under sections 34 and 33 of the FAA.

5.4.18 The driver should be instructed to deliver the bank statement directly to the MCO.

5.4.19 The mission should liaise with SPP to explore training opportunities in IMS/MM in order to enable compliance with financial directives covering contractual information.

5.4.20 The mission should revise the local hospitality rates and pass through CMM for approval.

5.4.21 The MCO should remind staff on Treasury Board Travel Directives and the need to complete travel claims in an accurate manner. Program Managers should be reviewing all claims prior to submitting to the accountant for processing.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

5.4.16 The mission *** in the Fall of 2014. Mission will liaise with RSCEMA on training that will be required. In Progress for December 2014.

5.4.17 Since the HOM assistant is departing in 2015, the current HOM AS should advise replacement to take training prior to posting. In Progress for September 2015.

5.4.18 Implemented. Driver is delivering the bank statements and all notices from the bank to the MCO. Implemented May 2013.

5.4.19 As contracts arise, the mission will liaise with SPP/Headquarters and/or missions that may serve as Common Service Delivery Points to ensure that contracts are included in the Materials Management (MM) module. Implemented July 2014.

5.4.20 MCO has discussed current local hospitality with PM's and they are appropriate. Nevertheless, rates will be revised in accordance with DFATD & TB guidelines and will be brought to CMM for review, discussion and approval. In Progress November 2014.

5.4.21 The new TB travel directives have been communicated to all staff. MCO & PM's have been reviewing all claims and where necessary, returning claims to staff if incomplete or if clarification is necessary. Implemented May 2013.

5.5 Information Management - Information Technology (IM-IT)

5.5.1 The responsibility for the mission's IM-IT equipment is under the responsibility of the RYADH FSITP. The FSITP uses resources available to oversee and address issues from the mission. In general, the mission is *** served by a *** FSITP who is in contact with the mission to provide guidance as required. On an ad hoc basis, the Office Manager provides limited IT support.

Management

Evaluation of IM-IT Management
Key IM-IT Management CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
An Information Management - Information Technology (IM-IT) plan exists and includes regional activities.X  
The liaison between the mission, HQ and the regional manager is effective. X 
The mission uses the required IM-IT service request system and maintains relevant data. X 

5.5.2 The management of the section *** and the workload in normal times is manageable for the FSITP located in RYADH mission. A plan is in place covering activities for the mission and scheduled visits take place to conduct regular maintenance and address specific issues.

5.5.3 A longstanding and significant past issue related to phone lines was addressed by the FSITP recently, which greatly improved communications for the mission. Close collaboration with the local service provider allowed this issue to be substantially reduced although some issues remain with the quality of the lines.

5.5.4 While communication between the mission and FSITP in RYADH is good, examples in the past have shown that at times mission priorities were different from those put forward by HQ. An example of this is seen in the previously referred to phone line issues, which at some point greatly affected the mission's ability to deliver its services efficiently.

5.5.5 Some concerns have been expressed in relation to this and the ability for the FSITP to conduct as many site visits as mission wishes. As such, client service has been noted as a concern. A Service requests system is used by most users, but the number left pending at the time of the inspection appeared relatively high given the size of the mission and its number of users.

Key Processes and Internal Controls

Evaluation of IM-IT Internal Control
Key IM-IT Internal Control CriteriaMeetsNeeds ImprovementDoes Not Meet
Back-ups are performed routinely and tapes are stored appropriately in a secure location away from the primary use area.X  
Employees formally sign out IT assets (mobility tools) and are advised of their accountabilities. X 
Surplus IT assets are disposed with the appropriate approvals per departmental policy.X  

5.5.6 Overall, IM-IT processes and controls were effective and managed by the FSITP and on site by the Office Manager taking on SSA duties. Routine tasks are performed as scheduled and allow the mission to function generally well. Disposal of surplus items are managed by the FSITP when visiting and is done appropriately.

5.5.7 No formal system for signing out of IT items was identified on site. Although communications on items on loan did exist, the whereabouts of items could not be tracked in a single document.

Recommendations

Recommendations to the Mission

5.5.8 The mission should ensure it communicates concerns about quality of its infrastructure to both regional FSITP and HQ to see issues addressed on a priority basis.

5.5.9 The mission's regional FSITP should share with the mission's Office Manager, tools for tracking IT equipment on loan.

Mission Actions and Timeframes

(Please note: The management actions below reflect the initial responses upon receiving the recommendations. They do not reflect the current status of implementation.)

5.5.8 The acting HOM has contacted key HQ stakeholders and mission is seeing movement to resolve this long outstanding issue. Mission has been informed that funding (at HQ level) is an issue and that the mission is a priority. In Progress for December 2014.

5.5.9 The mission only has one IT equipment for loan to staff and that is a laptop. Tracking is easily controlled by the Office Manager who has a sign out spreadsheet. Implemented May 2013.

Appendix A: Mission Resources Fact Sheet

Physical Resources
AssetsCrown-OwnedCrown-LeasedPrivate-Lease
Chancery 1 
Official Residence 1 
Staff Quarters 3 
Vehicles*  
Storage   
Financial Information 2012/2013
BudgetProgramCommon Services
Operating55,34649,530
Capital 9,300
CBS Salaries295,89591,324
CBS Overtime16,83017,450
LES Salaries435,700275,273
LES Overtime18,1175,500
Total821,888448,377
Human Resources (FTEs)
ProgramTotalCBSLES
Head of Mission523
FPDS1 1
CE413
Consular2 2
Common Services817
Total20416

Appendix B: Frequently Used Acronyms

CBS
Canada-based staff
CE
Commercial Economic
CMM
Committee on Mission Management
COMIP
Consular Management Information Program
CONPLAN
Contingency Plan
CRB
Contract Review Board
CSF
Client Service Fund
EFT
Electronic Funds Transfer
DMCO
Deputy Management Consular Officer
FPDS
Foreign Policy and Diplomacy Service
FSITP
Foreign Service Information Technology Professional
FTE
Full Time Equivalent
FY
Fiscal Year
GCS
Global Commerce Strategy
GVC
Global Value Chains
HOM
Head of Mission
HONCON
Honorary Consul
HQ
Headquarters
HR
Human Resources
HSZ
High Security Zone
ICT
Information Communication Technologies
IM-IT
Information Management - Information Technology
IMS
Integrated Management System
LEITP
Locally Engaged Information Technology Professional
LES
Locally engaged staff
LESMCB
LES Management Consultation Board
MCO
Management Consular Officer
MEP
Mission Emergency Plan
MFO
Mission Financial Officer
MM Module
Materiel Management Module of IMS
MMWP
Mission Maintenance Work Plan
MOU
Memorandum of Understanding
MSO
Mission Security Officer
MPMP
Mission Property Management Plan
NAAP
North American Platform Program
OR
Official residence
OZ
Operations Zone
PIF
Post Initiative Fund
PM
Program Manager
PMA
Performance Management Agreement
PMP
Human Resources - Performance Management Program
PMP
Consular - Passport Management Program
PRIME
Physical Resources Information - Mission Environment
ROCA
Registration of Canadians Abroad
S&T
Science and Technology
STC
Senior Trade Commissioner
SQ
Staff Quarter
SZ
Security Zone
TC
Trade Commissioner
TCA
Trade Commissioner Assistant
TCS
Trade Commissioner Service
TRIO
The TCS' Client Relationship Management System
ZID
Office of the Inspector General
ZIV
Missions Inspection Division
Date Modified: