List of Supplementary Information Tables

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Table of Contents

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

1. Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–16 tabled on November 4, 2013, guides the Government of Canada’s sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the FSDA, to make environmental decision-making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, DFATD supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this departmental strategy.

Accordingly, this Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) presents the results for the commitment for Theme I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality within the context of the 2013–16 FSDS. This DSDS also provides the results for Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government based on the 2010–13 FSDS.

On June 26, 2013, the Governor General gave Royal Assent to Bill C-60, creating the new Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) by amalgamating the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) with the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). As such, the fiscal year 2013-2014 has been a transition year, as the new department implements a common approach to Sustainable Development. For more information, please visit DFATD’s Sustainable Development website.

2. Themes I–III: Department/Agency–led Targets

FSDS Goal: 1.1.51. Provide legal services and advice for the international climate change negotiations, coordinate financial obligations.

FSDS Performance Indicator: Canada’s international climate change negotiators are satisfied with DFATD support.

FSDS Target: DFATD provides legal services and advice for the international climate change negotiations and coordinates financial obligations linked to climate change.

FSDS Performance Status: Achieved

3. Themes I–III: Implementation Strategies

4. Theme IV: Implementation Strategies

Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target

By March 31, 2014, each department will reuse or recycle all surplus electronic and electrical equipment (EEE) in an environmentally sound and secure manner. (Target 8.6 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Table 1: Surplus Electronic and Electrical Equipment Target
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusAchieved
Existence of implementation plan for the disposal of all departmentally generated EEE.Yes
Total number of departmental locations with EEE implementation plan fully implemented, expressed as a percentage of all locations, by the end of the given fiscal year.100%

Strategies and/or Comments:

  1. Definition of location: A location is a building or any of its parts wherein the administrative and physical duties are conducted.
  2. Total number of locations: DFATD has a total of 13 locations across Canada, consisting of 8 locations within the National Capital Region (NCR) and 5 Regional offices (RO) located across Canada. All DFATD offices in the NCR will return EEE to Materiel Management sector at 125 Sussex Drive, Ottawa, and/or 1770 Pink Road, Gatineau. EEE returned must be accompanied by a completed DFATD form 2135 Declaration of surplus describing the condition of each unit as being in working or non-working condition.
  3. At the RO, the form 2135 Declaration of surplus must be completed and submitted to the Materiel management sector for action. All EEE in the RO are either posted on GCSurplus for auction or dispose via a provincial E-waste program/service provider.
  4. A regular schedule for disposal of EEE will be established and circulated to all DFATD offices located in the NCR. Items in working condition are either returned to stockpile for future use, posted for auction sale via GCSurplus, or if the item does not power on, disposed of through the PWGSC Standing Offer for E-waste Recycling Services. In the context of the amalgamation, DFATD was not able to track and report on the total weight and/or on units of key equipment types disposed through designated streams at locations across Canada for 2013-14.
  5. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has achieved 100% of locations across Canada with an EEE implementation plan fully implemented.

Printing Unit Reduction Target

By March 31, 2013, each department will achieve an 8:1 average ratio of office employees to printing units. Departments will apply the target where building occupancy levels, security considerations, and space configuration allow. (Target 8.7 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Table 2: Printing Unit Reduction Target
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusAchieved
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units in fiscal year 2010-11, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow. (Optional)DFATD: 3:1
Ratio of departmental office employees to printing units at the end of the given fiscal year, where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configuration allow.DFATD: 8.1:1

Strategies and/or Comments: As not all processes were amalgamated during 2013-14, progress and results for the former DFAIT and the former CIDA are reported separately for this target.

Former DFAIT:

  1. Definition of printing units: Desktop and networked printers, multi-function printers installed on the non-classified Secure Integrated Global Network (SIGNET), fax machines (excluding secure fax) and photocopiers.
  2. Scope:
    1. The target ratio applies to all locations in the NCR where building occupancy levels, security considerations and space configurations allow.
    2. The application of the target ratio to operations outside of Canada is not required under the FSDS; reported data is therefore limited to operations within the NCR. Nonetheless, a consistent policy on printing devices will be applied at regional offices and at missions abroad as a best practice.
  3. Method for determining the number of printing units: The number of printing devices in use within the NCR is estimated at 749, based on the following:
    1. Networked printers as indicated by the number of active print queues: 468;
    2. Per inventory records:
      • Single-user desktop printers: 145;
      • Standalone photocopiers: 117;
      • Fax machines: 19.
  4. Method for determining the number of office employees: The number of SIGNET accounts assigned to individual users at DFAIT locations within the NCR (non-classified system), including indeterminate employees, contractors, casual and students: 6,721, as of March 31, 2014.
  5. Implementation strategies:
    1. Under the authority of the Chief Information Officer, a three-year implementation plan will establish an 8:1 ratio of printing devices to office employees in all departmental locations. Progress will be achieved through cluster replacement with single units, equipment attrition, and the removal of single-user desktop printers. Exceptions will be made where additional devices are justified by specific business requirements, or if a duty to accommodate exists based on an employee requiring modified physical and ergonomic conditions to perform his or her duties.
    2. In all cases, existing equipment will be maintained until economic and environmental considerations justify the disposal of assets, to respect the intent of the FSDS to minimize the environmental impact of operations. The time frame also accounts for renovations scheduled at facilities in the NCR during the next three years. The refurbished office space will be equipped based on the target ratio.
    3. A departmental policy on printing devices has been established to inform all employee of the objectives and expected results of the printing device consolidation strategy.
    4. A process has been established to facilitate business case reviews for all requests for new or replacement printing devices.
  6. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has achieved an 8:1 ratio of office employees to printing units.

Former CIDA:

  1. Target ratio of 8:1 was met in 2013-14. The rationalisation program at former CIDA achieved its objective to eliminate 50% of the printing units in circulation.
  2. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has achieved an 8:1 ratio of office employees to printing units.

Paper consumption target

By March 31, 2014, each department will reduce internal paper consumption per office employee by 20%. Each department will establish a baseline between 2005-06 and 2011-12, and an applicable scope. (Target 8.8 from 2010-13 FSDS)

Table 3: Paper consumption target
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusExceeded
Number of sheets of internal office paper purchased or consumed per office employee in the selected baseline year, according to the departmental scope.DFATD: 8,442.45 sheets/office employee in 2008-09.
Cumulative reduction (or increase) in paper consumption per office employee in the given fiscal year, expressed as a percentage, relative to the selected baseline year.DFATD: 37,122,000 sheets (44% reduction).

Strategies and/or Comments: As not all processes were amalgamated during 2013-14, progress and results for the former DFAIT and the former CIDA are reported separately for this target.

Former DFAIT:

  1. Scope: Paper volume is the total volume of paper (all sizes and colours) used in printers and photocopiers on an annual basis in all DFAIT locations in the NCR.
  2. Method used for determining paper consumption: Paper consumption is tracked by the Materiel Management group on an ongoing monthly basis. Paper usage in fiscal year 2008-09 in the NCR was 38,924,500 sheets.
  3. Method used for determining office employees: Human Resource Management System Business Intelligence Cube, which indicated 4,155 employees and 300 contractors (estimate) in the NCR, for a total of 4,455 as of March 2009. Only employees within the NCR were used because they represent 99% of all departmental employees in Canada.
  4. Implementation strategies:
    1. Promote awareness of “Green It” initiatives within DFAIT to reduce the department's environmental footprint.
    2. Implement double-sided printing as a default on all DFAIT network print devices.
  5. Target: From the baseline of fiscal year 2008-09 to 2013-2014, DFAIT has reduced overall paper consumption by over 48%.
  6. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: 1) Target exceeded; and 2) efforts are made to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts associated with the achievement of the target.

Former CIDA:

  1. The former CIDA no longer tracks this information per sheet, but it confirmed that it exceeded the 20% target of reduction in paper consumption by 46% in 2012-13. Since the amalgamation, the supply chain activity of copier paper has now been amalgamated with Materiel Management sector of former DFAIT. All data are recorded in the Department Corporate System, which allows reporting capability on paper consumption by location and floor.
  2. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: 1) Target exceeded; and 2) efforts are made to quantify and report on reduced environmental impacts associated with the achievement of the target.

Green Meetings Target

By March 31, 2012, each department will adopt a guide for greening meetings. (Target 8.9 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Table 4: Green Meetings Target
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusAchieved
Presence of a green meetings guide.Yes

Strategies and/or Comments: As not all processes were amalgamated during 2013-14, progress and results for the former DFAIT and the former CIDA are reported separately for this target.

Former DFAIT:

  1. Endorsed the use of Environment Canada's Green Meeting Guide and provides a link to this guide on DFATD's intranet site.
  2. At time of reporting, there were 364 VCNet systems: 227 at missions and 137 in the NCR.
  3. VCNet utilization statistics:
    1. Number of unique systems connecting to VCNet per month over reporting period increased from 254 to 295 per month (average 270 per month).
    2. Number of individual VCNet calls per month: Call volume increased from 3,226 calls in April 2013 to 4,560 calls in March 2014. During reporting period, 45,012 videoconference calls were placed (average 3,751 calls per month).
    3. Length of videoconference calls: Total number of hours spent videoconferencing increased over reporting period, from 2,230 hours in April 2013 to 5,605 hours in March 2014 (average 4,400 hours per month).
  4. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has adopted a green meetings guide.

Former CIDA:

  1. The Environmental Officer and the Green Team developed the protocol that was published on CIDA's intranet site in May 2008. It is applicable to all meeting rooms in all locations of former CIDA by every employee and for meetings outside the Agency.
  2. Projection equipment and computers linked to the network have been in place since 2009 in all corporate meeting rooms, video-teleconferencing rooms and VP boardrooms.
  3. Rationale for traffic light indicator selected: Department has adopted a green meetings guide.

Green Procurement Targets

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish at least three SMART green procurement targets to reduce environmental impacts. (Target 8.10 from 2010–13 FSDS)

1. DFAIT: By March 31, 2014, 95% of copy-paper purchases contain a minimum of 30% recycled content and have forest management certification or EcoLogo® or equivalent certification.

Table 5a: Green Procurement Targets - DFAIT
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusAchieved
Percentage (in dollar or volume) of paper purchases meeting the target relative to total amount (in dollar or volume) of all paper purchases in the given year.100%
All paper purchased in Canada for missions are green procurement compliant
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.100%

Why this self-selected target is SMART:

  1. Specific: Presently procuring, through PWGSC standing offers, paper with 30% post-consumer content. This paper has the FDL trademark (FDL = Fiber Diverted from Landfills) and is certified by BLI (Buyers Laboratory Inc.).
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the material management module of the department’s financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Existing standing offers already meet target.
  4. Relevant: FSC-certified (Forest Stewardship Council) products regularly procured.
  5. Time-bound: FSC feature is already available on the market.

Other reporting considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: The Department has achieved the self-selected target.
  2. Roles and responsibilities: At DFATD, the supply chain activity of copier paper is the responsibility of the Materiel Management sector.
  3. Process and reporting requirements: All data are recorded in the Department Corporate System with reporting capability on the overall number of paper purchased and consumption by location and floor.
  4. Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new FSC-certified products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.

2. DFAIT: By March 31, 2014, 60% of purchases of chairs, cabinets, shelving, panels and desks will be environmentally preferred models.

Table 5b: Green Procurement Targets - DFAIT
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusAchieved
Percentage (in dollar or volume) of furniture purchases meeting the target relative to total amount (in dollar or volume) of all furniture purchases in the given year.100%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.100%

Why this self-selected target is SMART:

  1. Specific: Office furniture purchased by DFATD for domestic use was procured through PWGSC standing offers that specify environmental criteria with which suppliers must comply.
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the material management module of the department's financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Target already incorporated into existing standing offers and technical requirements, as relevant to the commodity.
  4. Relevant: Online ordering system (Shop@DFAIT) already identifies green products.
  5. Time-bound: The market continues to evolve in its supply of these specific green products.

Other reporting considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: The Department has achieved the self-selected target.
  2. Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.

3. DFAIT: By March 31, 2014, 60% of purchases of copy paper, envelopes, notebooks, file folders, binders, writing instruments, toner cartridges and batteries will have environmental features.

Table 5c: Green Procurement Targets - DFAIT
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusExceeded
Dollar value (or volume) of office supply purchases meeting the target relative to total dollar value (or volume) of all office supply purchases in the given year95%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.95%

Why this self-selected target is SMART:

  1. Specific: All office supplies (papers, envelopes, notebooks, etc.) purchased for former DFAIT domestic consumption contained recycled content and renewable resources. These items were purchased through PWGSC standing offers, which specify environmental criteria with which suppliers must comply.
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the material management module of the department's financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Target already in progress through existing standing offers and incorporated into technical requirements as relevant to the commodity.
  4. Relevant: Online ordering system (Shop@DFAIT) already identifies green products.
  5. Time-bound: The market continues to evolve in its supply of these specific green products.

Other reporting considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: The Department has achieved the self-selected target.
  2. Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.

4. CIDA: By March 31, 2013, CIDA will purchase only computers that meet the green standards of PWGSC.

Table 6a: Green Procurement Targets - CIDA
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusExceeded
% of computers purchased in 2012-2013 that meet the green standards of PWGSC.100%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.100%

Why this self-selected target is SMART:

  1. Specific: All computers were purchased through PWGSC standing offers, which specify environmental criteria with which suppliers must comply.
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the material management module of the department's financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Target already incorporated into existing standing offers and technical requirements, as relevant to the commodity.
  4. Relevant: Online ordering system (Shop@DFAIT) already identifies green products.
  5. Time-bound: The market continues to evolve in its supply of these specific green products.

Other reporting considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: The Department has achieved the self-selected target.
  2. Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.

5. CIDA: By March 31, 2013, CIDA will purchase only furniture that meets the green standards of PWGSC.

Table 6b: Green Procurement Targets - CIDA
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusExceeded
% of furniture purchased in 2012-2013 that meets the green standards of PWGSC.100%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.100%

Why this self-selected target is SMART:

  1. Specific: Office furniture purchased by the former CIDA was procured through PWGSC standing offers that specify environmental criteria with which suppliers must comply.
  2. Measurable: Statistical data will be extracted from the material management module of the department's financial management system.
  3. Achievable: Target already incorporated into existing standing offers and technical requirements, as relevant to the commodity.
  4. Relevant: Online ordering system (Shop@DFAIT) already identifies green products.
  5. Time-bound: The market continues to evolve in its supply of these specific green products.

Other reporting considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: The Department has exceeded the self-selected target.
  2. Implementation Strategies: Incorporate new products as they become available. Increase internal communication to promote awareness and consumption of green products.

6. CIDA: By March 31, 2013, CIDA will only purchase vehicles that are either hybrids or use alternate fuels when this alternative is available.

Table 6c: Green Procurement Targets - CIDA
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusAchieved
% of vehicles purchased in 2012-2013 that are either hybrid or use alternate fuels.100%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.100%

Strategies and/or Comments: CIDA did not purchase any vehicle in 2013-14. Since the amalgamation, the fleet management responsibility has been transferred to the Materiel Management sector. DFATD will only purchase vehicles that are either hybrids or use alternate fuels, when this alternative is available.

As of April 1, 2011, each department will establish SMART targets for training, employee performance evaluations, and management processes and controls, as they pertain to procurement decision making. (Target 8.11 from 2010–13 FSDS)

Training for select employees – DFAIT: As of April 1, 2011, 90% of materiel managers and procurement personnel (including all PG classified employees, as well as employees identified as a procurement and/or materiel management functional specialist) will receive green procurement training through the Canada School of Public Service course C215.

Table 7: Training for select employees – DFAIT
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusOpportunity for improvement
Number of procurement and materiel management staff with formal green procurement training relative to total number of procurement and materiel management staff.86/114
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.75%

Why this self-selected target is SMART:

  1. Specific: Achievement level of 90%, type of employee, and type of training
  2. Measurable: Information available from CSPS and in-house HR tracking system.
  3. Achievable: Departmental policy mandates all existing and new designated employees to take green procurement training.
  4. Relevant: Targets all relevant employees.
  5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other reporting considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: Targeting 100% of employees is difficult due to high turnover rates in the PG community and the amalgamation of the former CIDA and former DFAIT.
  2. Methodology: See target wording. All designated employees are directed by management to take green procurement training.
  3. In-house training used: None—CSPS Course C215 only.
  4. Reporting requirements: Collect data from CSPS annually; HR maintains an up-to-date list of employees with and/or needing training. Training records are kept to ensure compliance.
  5. Roles and responsibilities: The Director General (DG), Corporate Procurement, Asset Management and National Accommodation (SPD), is the lead for procurement and materiel management policy and community development.
  6. Plans for engagement: Email dissemination of departmental policy and information mandating training added to procurement and materiel management website.

Training for select employees – CIDA: As of April 1, 2011, all procurement officers will have taken a recognized training course on green procurement.

Table 8: Training for select employees – CIDA
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusOpportunity for improvement
% of procurement officers that have access to the procurement system that have completed a recognized training course on green procurement.75%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.75%

Strategies and/or Comments:

  1. Procurement officers acquire the majority of goods on behalf of the department. They are strategically positioned to ensure that all actions required to ensure green purchases are not only taken, but also considered as part of the entire purchasing process. Team sessions have been held internally with all stakeholders to explain the initiative and the requirement to comply with green purchasing.
  2. All designated employees are directed by management to take green procurement training. Training records are kept to ensure compliance.
  3. Targeting 100% of employees is difficult due to high turnover rates in the PG community, and the amalgamation of the former CIDA.

Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management – DFAIT: As of April 1, 2012, environmental considerations will be incorporated into the performance evaluations of all functional heads of procurement and materiel management.

Table 9: Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management – DFAIT
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusOpportunity for improvement
Number of performance evaluations that incorporated environmental considerations, relative to total number of performance evaluations of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management.6/11
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.55%

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  1. Specific: Achievement level of 100% and type of employee.
  2. Measurable: Information available from in-house HR tracking system.
  3. Achievable: Departmental policy mandates that all existing and new functional heads of procurement and materiel management include environmental considerations in their performance evaluations.
  4. Relevant: Targets all relevant employees.
  5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: Targeting 100% of employees is difficult due to high turnover rates and the amalgamation of the former CIDA and former DFAIT.
  2. Methodology: The Directors general and directors of PG classified employees and employees identified as procurement and/or materiel management functional specialists.
  3. Reporting requirements: DGs to report to target lead.
  4. Roles and responsibilities: The DG, Corporate Procurement, Asset Management and National Accommodation (SPD) is the lead for procurement policy and community development.
  5. Plans for engagement: Environmental considerations will be included in the performance agreements and evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management, as part of the stewardship role for which they are responsible for.

Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management – CIDA: By fiscal year 2013-2014, all procurement officers' performance evaluations will have environmental consideration clauses incorporated therein.

Table 10: Employee performance evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management – CIDA
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusOpportunity for improvement
% of procurement officers’ performance evaluations for 2012-2013 that incorporate clauses of environmental considerations.75%
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.100%

Strategies and/or Comments: Environmental consideration will be included in the performance agreements and evaluations for managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management, as part of the stewardship role that they are responsible for. Once the process is well in place following the amalgamation, the potential for expanding to credit card holders and the managers of these responsibility centers will be considered.

Management processes and controls - DFAIT: The Procurement Modernization Initiative (PMI) is currently under way and incorporates green procurement processes. This exercise will identify any green procurement processes and controls that have been omitted and will address them accordingly.

Table 11: Management processes and controls - DFAIT
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusAchieved
Number of departmental procurement processes and controls that incorporate environmental considerations relative to total number of departmental procurement processes and controls that should address environmental considerations8/10
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.80%

Why this self-selected target is SMART

  1. Specific: Achievement level of all identified processes and controls.
  2. Measurable: Baseline set for all formalized management processes and controls.
  3. Achievable: Dedicated employees responsible for target.
  4. Relevant: Decision-making authority for purchases decentralized.
  5. Time-bound: Date established for target implementation and completion.

Other Reporting Considerations:

  1. Rationale for traffic light indicator: Targeting 100% of employees is difficult due to high turnover rates and the amalgamation of the former CIDA and former DFAIT.
  2. Methodology: Analysis of department's decision-making processes and controls to determine those that should include environmental considerations.
  3. Reporting requirements: The DG to lead reports annually.
  4. Roles and responsibilities: The DG, Corporate Procurement, Asset Management and National Accommodation (SPD) is the lead for procurement and materiel management policy and community development of PGs.
  5. Mechanisms to evaluate: First review scheduled in 2014.
  6. Plans for engagement: Discussion topic of Management Committee. In 2012, the former DFAIT undertook the examination of its supply chain through the Procurement Modernization Initiative. As of January 1, 2014, the results of this initiative have been rolled-out across DFATD, with an emphasis on strengthening governance and strategic planning, capacity building, monitoring and oversight, service delivery and business processes (which include green procurement) and technological aspects of the department’s contracting activities

Management processes and controls - CIDA: By April 1, 2011 a minimum of 1 management processes and controls related to procurement and/or material management will be adjusted to support departmental green procurement implementation.

Table 12: Management processes and controls - CIDA
Performance MeasurePerformance Status
Target StatusOpportunity for improvement
New module activated in SAP for 2012-2013.Yes
Progress against measure in the given fiscal year.50%

Strategies and/or Comments: As a result of the amalgamation, since April 1, 2014, both Corporate Systems for the Operations and Maintenance activities has been merged into one platform. For 2014-2015, this will result to strengthen the governance and strategic planning, monitoring and oversight, service delivery and business processes (which include Materiel management & Green Procurement), and technology of the department’s contracting and materiel management activities.

Reporting on the Purchase of Offset Credits

Mandatory reporting on the purchase of greenhouse gas emissions offset credits, as per the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events.

Performance Measure: Quantity of emissions offset in the given fiscal year.

Performance Status: Not applicable, as no major international events were hosted in Canada in 2013-14.

Strategies and/or Comments: In keeping with its commitment to sustainable development goals, the department will increase awareness of sound environmental, social and economic sustainability practices of waste minimization and management, pollution reduction and energy conservation. During the planning stage of major international events, DFATD makes a commitment that the event will be carbon neutral. Being carbon neutral requires that DFATD first takes all reasonable measures to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, calculates the remaining emissions and then mitigates those to zero by purchasing emission reduction credits or carbon offsets. DFATD will follow the Policy Framework for Offsetting Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Major International Events.

5. Additional Departmental/Agency Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

Not applicable

6. Sustainable Development Management System

Not available

7. Strategic Environmental Assessment

During the 2013-14 reporting cycle, DFATD considered the environmental effects of initiatives subject to the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, as part of its decision–making processes. Through the strategic environmental assessment (SEA) process, departmental proposals were found to have neutral to positive effects on the 2013–16 FSDS goals and targets in Theme(s) I – Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality; II – Maintaining Water Quality and Availability; III – Protecting Nature and Canadians, and the 2010–13 FSDS for Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government. Additional information can be found at:

Details of Transfer Payment Programs

Ex-Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

Afghanistan Counter-Narcotics Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Afghanistan Counter-Narcotics Program (ACNP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: December 8, 2011

End Date: March 31, 2014

Description: The ACNP provides assistance to enhance the capacity of states, government entities thereof and international organizations to secure a sustainable decrease in the cultivation, production, trafficking and consumption of illicit drugs.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome:Canada's International Agenda - The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 13: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions12.06.06.00.00.06.0
Total Program12.06.06.00.00.06.0

Comments on Variances: Funds were advanced to the recipient in 2011-12 based on need, and therefore planned spending for 2013-14 did not occur.

Audits Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program (ACCBP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: December 9, 2009

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The AACBP was launched in 2009 to enhance the capacity of beneficiary states and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats posed by international criminal activity throughout the Americas. Its long-term objective is to counter the corrosive impact that transnational criminal organizations have on the rule of law, democratic governance and economic growth in the hemisphere, while also bolstering the safety of Canadians and the security of Canadian interests in the region. The ACCBP is a key element of the Government of Canada's Americas Strategy and National Anti-Drug Strategy.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda-The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 14: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Grants10.24.87.09.79.7-2.7
Total Contributions26.110.55.27.57.5-2.3
Total Program36.315.312.217.217.3-5.0

Comments on Variances: In the above table, planned grants and contributions does not include the planned funding envelope to counter human smuggling (not reflected in Main Estimates as it was received in the Supplementary Estimates C), the Organization of American States (OAS), the Annual Voluntary Contributions (AVCs) and the Canadian Security in Central America (CISCA). It should be noted that the 2012-13 transfer payment programs’ exercise included all of the funding allocations. If the planned funding allocations for the ACCBP are included, the final numbers are as follows:

Table 15: Variance
($ millions) 2013-14
Planned Spending
2013-14
Actual Spending
Variance
Grants11.79.72.0
Contributions13.38.54.8
Total25.018.2-6.8

Contributions:

In all, the shortfall of $1.0 million for the CISCA envelope, the $2.45 million lapse for the UNODC AVC, the $0.61 million IAE holdback plus the $0.49 million transfer in from grants accounts for $3.57 million of the $4.8 million lapse. The remaining surplus of $1.15 million, which was due to a lack of project initiation authorizations, was absorbed by another program within the department at end of fiscal.

Grants: A surplus of $1.45 million was due to a lack of project initiation authorizations and was absorbed by another program within the department at end of fiscal. A further $0.49 million was transferred to contributions to cover programming needs.

Audits Completed or Planned: No program audits were conducted in 2013-14. Several recipient audits were conducted. A summative evaluation of the ACCBP will be undertaken in 2014-15.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: A formative evaluation was completed in 2013-14 and a summative evaluation will be undertaken in 2014-15.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Canada Fund for Local Initiatives

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Canada Fund for Local Initiatives (CFLI) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: April 1, 2012

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The CFLI is a contribution program delivered through Canada's missions abroad. Through contribution agreements, the CFLI provides monetary assistance to cover all, or a portion, of the cost of projects that are comparatively modest in scope, scale and cost and that are usually conceived and designed by local authorities or organizations. The CFLI funds a considerable range of projects, but they must be consistent with Canada's thematic priorities for development assistance, with a particular emphasis on advancing democracy and ensuring security and stability. The projects must also afford opportunities to advance Canada's values and interests and/or strengthen Canada's bilateral relations with foreign countries and their civil societies.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 16: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total contributions0.013.814.714.26.97.8
Total Program0.013.814.714.26.97.8

Comments on Variances: Actual program spending in 2013-14 was less than the total authorities, reflecting a condensed programming time frame.

Audits Completed or Planned: A comprehensive program audit is scheduled to take place in 2015-16. Recipient audits take place on a small sample of projects each year. Two projects were audited in 2013-14, and the auditors were satisfied with the recipients’ implementation of the contribution agreement.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: Planned formative evaluation for 2014-15 and summative evaluation in 2016-17.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: By program design, the CFLI is intended to respond to local needs and engage closely with recipients. Applicants are solicited through open calls for proposals, which clearly identify a staff person who is responsible for responding to queries. Many Canadian high commissions and embassies hold information sessions for interested applicants. Once projects are selected for funding, recipients and mission personnel are in frequent communication throughout the implementation and reporting process. Mission personnel often visit projects. Additionally, recipients may be offered the opportunity to participate in group experience-sharing workshops or training, including on financial reporting and record-keeping.

Commonwealth Secretariat

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Commonwealth Secretariat (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: September 28, 1965

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to the Commonwealth's regular budget is an obligation of membership. The purpose of Canada's membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and, to this end, to enhance relationships among the 53 Commonwealth member countries.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 17: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions5.05.15.25.65.6-0.4
Total Program5.05.15.25.65.6-0.4

Comments on Variances: The Commonwealth Secretariat adopted a zero-real-growth approach for its 2013-14 budgetary exercise.

Audits Completed or Planned: No audits have been conducted or planned by DFATD. The Board of Governors, including Canada, receive the auditor’s report and act on any opinions annually.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: As part of DFATD’s multilateral review exercise, the Commonwealth was examined in 2013-14.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: For further information, please visit the Commonwealth website.

Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program ( CTCBP ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: September 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The CTCBP was launched in 2005 to enhance the capacity of government agencies and international organizations to prevent and respond to threats posed by terrorist activity worldwide, in a manner consistent with international human rights obligations, norms and standards. Its objective is to support states that lack the means but not the will to fight terrorism, while also bolstering the safety of Canadians and the security of Canadian interests globally. The CTCBP is a key element of Canada's international terrorism prevention efforts.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 18: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Grants8.04.68.95.25.23.7
Total Contributions8.95.68.97.87.51.4
Total Program16.910.217.813.012.75.1

Comments on Variances: With respect to grants, a total of $3.7 million was lapsed due to the project concepts not receiving project initiation authorization. With respect to contributions, a $1.4-million surplus can be attributed to the IAE holdback ($0.9 million), the postponement of project activities ($0.46 million), and the project concepts not receiving project initiation authorization ($45,000).

Audits Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluations Completed or Planned: Planned evaluation for FY 2014-15.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations ( FAO ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: 1945

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the FAO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to agricultural development and to provide it with a voice in the international community.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

These results were the product of focusing on three main goals: 1) eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition, progressively ensuring a world in which people at all times have sufficient safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life; 2) elimination of poverty and the driving forward of economic and social progress for all, with increased food production, enhanced rural development and sustainable livelihoods; and 3) sustainable management and utilization of natural resources, including land, water, air, climate and genetic resources for the benefit of present and future generations.

Building on previous reforms and the review of the Strategic Framework, the FAO introduced transformative measures to enhance and better align the structure and function of the organization to deliver effectively against the reoriented strategic direction. These changes are underpinned by targeted institutional strengthening, along with the pursuit of value-for-money measures. For further information about the FAO’s revised core functions in the context of its revised Strategic Framework and Medium-Term Plan 2014-17, please refer to The Director-General’s Medium Term Plan 2014-17 and Programme of Work and Budget 2014-15.

The FAO's program and budget, which set out the strategic objectives and expected outcomes for the organization's work, are approved every two years by the FAO Conference.

Table 19: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions16.615.816.316.616.6-0.3
Total Program16.615.816.316.616.6-0.3

Comments on Variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits Completed or Planned: The FAO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Global Commerce Support Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Commerce Support Program ( GCSP ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: December 11, 2008

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Approved under the new Transfer Payment Policy, the GCSP is a contribution program that harmonizes three previously existing programs under one umbrella mechanism:

The objective of the program is to build a stronger and more competitive Canadian capacity to compete in the global economy.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: International Services for Canadians - Canadians are satisfied with commercial, consular and passport services.

Results Achieved:

Table 20: Program - International Commerce ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-142
Variance

2 Actual spending for 2013-14 also includes outstanding PAYE payments of $107,306 to the GOA. As such, total spending for 2013-14 may be lower than reported in the above table.

Total Contributions5.75.46.06.05.40.7
Total Program5.45.76.06.05.40.7

Comments on Variances: No budget allocated to GGI during the fiscal year was reported. Project funding is approved based on estimates; however, actual expenditures were lower in some cases.

Audits Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluations Completed or Planned: An evaluation is expected to be completed in fall 2014.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Evaluation scope includes recipient, sector and delivery officers’ feedback.

Global Partnership Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Partnership Program (GPP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: August 12, 2003

End Date: March 31, 2018

Description: Canada’s GPP is the main mechanism by which Canada supports international efforts to combat and reduce the global threat of chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) proliferation and terrorism. The GPP was established as part of Canada’s contribution to the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction (Global Partnership). Formed at the G-8 Kananaskis Summit in 2002 as a direct response to 9/11, the Global Partnership began as a ten-year, US$20-billion initiative aimed at addressing the threat of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) proliferation to non-state actors and states of proliferation concern. In accordance with priorities established at the 2010 G-8 Muskoka Summit, the GPP pursues programming activities across four thematic areas: 1) nuclear and radiological security; 2) biological security; 3) supporting the implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540; and 4) countering WMD-related knowledge proliferation. Programming through the GPP contributes to Canadian and global security by directly addressing and mitigating specific WMD threats in the Middle East, North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, the Americas and Asia. The first mandate of the program concluded on March 31, 2013, with a new five-year mandate (2013-18) launched on April 1, 2013, at a funding level of $73.4 million per year.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Nuclear and Radiological Security

Biological Security

Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1540

Chemical Weapons Destruction

Table 21: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Grants0.00.025.819.719.76.1
Total Contributions92.949.637.719.919.718_0
Total Program92.949.663.539.639.424.1

Comments on Variances: The program’s budget was reduced by 5 percent ($3.14 million) for the IAE holdback. The Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) absorbed $11.4 million, and $8.9 million was transferred to the International Security and Political Affairs Branch Frozen reserve, leaving $0.6 million remaining. The program lapsed a total of $24.1 million due to lack of project initiation authorization approvals.

Audits Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluations Completed or Planned: An evaluation was completed in 2013-14, and an evaluation is planned for 2015-16.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: In addition to using DFATD’s global network of missions to identify potential project initiatives, the GPP also undertakes targeted outreach and assessment missions to countries identified in its interdepartmental strategic programming framework exercise. The GPP also engages with relevant multilateral institutions (e.g. IAEA, World Health Organization [WHO] and OPCW), select like-minded allies (e.g. the United States and the United Kingdom) and participates in international forums (e.g. Global Partnership Working Group and Nuclear Security Summit Sherpa and Sous-Sherpa meetings) to engage potential partners.

Global Peace and Security Fund and its component programs

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Global Peace and Security Fund Program (GPSF) for Peace and Security (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: Operationalized on September 18, 2006

End Date: March 31, 2014

Description: Sourced from the Peace and Security Pool of the IAE, the GPSF funds the operations of the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START). It is used to conduct international assistance programming in fragile and conflict-affected states, such as those in the Middle East, Burma and Ukraine. START and the GPSF were originally created to fill a policy, institutional and funding gap between ex-CIDA humanitarian and long-term development assistance and the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Forces’ military and training assistance. START has played its role effectively, establishing itself as a platform to facilitate whole-of-government engagement, as well as policy development where appropriate. In recent years, OGDs, such as Public Safety Canada (PS), the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), Correctional Service Canada (CSC), Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and the Department of Justice actively participated in stabilization and reconstruction initiatives, as well as in crisis response activities on behalf of START.

The GPSF programming provides timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to peace and security challenges, which implicate Canadian interests and reflect Canadian foreign policy priorities. It also funds the deployment of public service expert, which enables DFATD to work closely with federal departments and agencies to provide beneficiary states and civilian components of multilateral peace operations with critical expertise in the areas of security and justice system reform.

The GPSF is managed by START. To ensure policy coherence and to avoid duplication, various interdepartmental and intradepartmental committees are called upon as required to inform and guide emerging priority-setting exercises and implement Cabinet-mandated priorities in the whole-of-government context. START is located in DFATD's International Security Branch, which is responsible for START's financial, human and physical resources.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

A. Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states through the provision of targeted programming. Specifically, GPSF funds have:

B. Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations through the provision of targeted programming and/or crisis response capabilities, including:

C. Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations:

Table 22: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Grants13.121.80.020.016.0-16.0
Total Contributions50.751.10.040.044.4-44.4
Total Program63.872.90.060.060.4-60.4

Comments on Variances: The GPSF was scheduled to sunset on March 31, 2013. As such, planned spending was suspended until new programming authorities and funding were secured. The GPSF acquired authorities and funding for $60 million in Grants and Contributions in the 2013-14 Supplementary Estimates “B” after the RPP had been published. Therefore, this variance is only accurate when compared to the planned spending in the 2013-14 RPP. The actual planned spending exercise, undertaken during the Streamlined CFO Attestation process through Treasury Board (TB), was appropriately costed using the TB-approved costing model.

Audits Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: General information and objectives about the program are posted on the START website, and applicants may submit their project proposals at any time of the year.

Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Grants and Contributions in Aid of Academic Relations (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Description: These grants and contributions expand international education programs to more effectively and efficiently advance departmental priorities, which include contributing to Canada's competitiveness in the education sector and promoting democracy, the rule of law and human rights.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda-The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 23: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Grants5.13.95.52.31.63.9
Total Contributions15.47.61.66.26.1-4.5
Total Program20.511.57.18.57.7-0.5

Comments on Variances: Variance in planned and actual spending in 2013-14 was related to the identification of additional funding from elsewhere in the department, which was provided to support approved but unfunded Academic Relations activities. Most of the funding was provided as grants, but the majority of activities were more applicable to the characteristics of contributions, which explain the conversion of some grants to contributions.

Audits Completed or Planned: No audit was completed in 2013-14. Discussion is under way regarding the timing of a possible audit.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: No evaluation was completed in 2013-14. Discussion is under way regarding the timing of a possible evaluation.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Under the Emerging Leaders in the Americas Program (ELAP), the department hosted 34 graduate students from nine countries in Latin America and the Caribbean for the annual Democracy Study Tour. During the week, students were exposed to Canadian models of democratic governance, the role of the civil society, freedom of the press, corporate social responsibility, and more activities, including meetings with Canadian elected officials, senior Government of Canada representatives, as well as with representatives of their own countries in Canada.

The High Commission of Canada in Trinidad and Tobago hosted the Canada-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Forum on March 5, 2014. Three students from the CARICOM who were in Canada under a DFATD scholarship presented their graduate research on Canada-CARICOM relations and the opportunities for closer ties, in the context of the upcoming Canada-CARICOM trade agreement.

The department invited representatives of 22 post-secondary institutions from 14 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean to undertake a tour of Western Canada and to attend the Canadian Bureau for International Education Annual Conference to meet their Canadian counterparts to discuss potential partnerships, including research collaboration and academic mobility.

In October 2013, Mexico hosted the third edition of the Conference of the Americas on International Education (CAIE) in Monterrey. CAIE is an initiative that the department launched in Calgary in 2010. Over 800 participants from 30 countries attended the CAIE in 2013, which represents 200 more participants than the CAIE Secretariat expected. Approximately 60 Canadian representatives of provincial and federal government departments, post-secondary institutions and sectoral associations and/or organizations attended the CAIE in 2013.

International Atomic Energy Agency

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Atomic Energy Agency ( IAEA ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: December 19, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the IAEA is a legally binding obligation of the membership. Payment is made to ensure that membership is in good standing and to maintain influence and credibility in a key international body, the aims of which Canada supports. The IAEA is the world's centre of cooperation in the nuclear field and it works to further the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technology, in particular by verifying that states adhere to their commitments to use nuclear energy only for peaceful purposes. Canada has significant interests at the IAEA, based on the importance of the Agency's role in advancing the goals of nuclear non-proliferation, safety and security, Canada’s advanced and extensive nuclear-energy and radioisotope production industries, and its important uranium sector. This assessed contribution does not include the assessed voluntary contribution to the IAEA Technical Cooperation Program.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 24: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions13.713.414.314.514.5-0.2
Total Program13.713.414.314.514.5-0.2

Comments on Variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. There are also regular currency fluctuations.

Audits Completed or Planned: The IAEA’s Office of Internal Oversight Services provides functions such as internal auditing, program monitoring, program evaluation, inspections, consulting and investigations. The IAEA also appoints an external auditor to audit the IAEA’s accounts. The current external auditor is the Comptroller and Auditor General of India. Canada's representatives to the IAEA will have access to any audit and financial reports produced by the various oversight bodies and presented to the IAEA Board of Governors or at the General Conference. DFATD officials may review these reports and advocate Canadian issues, as required.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: The results of this year’s audit will be made available at the upcoming IAEA General Conference in September 2014.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

International Criminal Court

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Criminal Court ( ICC ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: April 1, 2005

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The ICC is an assessed-contribution transfer payment. Canada's annual assessed contribution to the ICC is a legally binding obligation of membership.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Canada has provided support to the ICC in the following ways:

Table 25: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions6.86.87.19.29.2-2.1
Total Program6.86.87.19.29.2-2.1

Comments on Variances: N/A

Audits Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Canada is an active participant in the annual ASP, on the Bureau of the ASP, and on the Committee on Budget and Finance. The Embassy of Canada to the Netherlands is regularly in direct contact with Court officials and, together with the Consulate General of Canada in New York, participates in working groups dealing with governance and financial issues affecting the Court. Recently, Canada hosted the Registrar of the ICC, who explained the ReVision Project and its anticipated cost savings. Canada, together with the five other largest contributors to the ICC’s budget, is pressing for further budget efficiencies.

International Labour Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Labour Organization ( ILO ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The ILO was founded in 1919, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the ILO, a UN specialized agency, is a legally binding obligation of the membership. The purpose of the membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to international labour and social policy issues in order to provide Canada with a voice in the international community.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 26: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions12.511.812.613.413.4-0.8
Total Program12.511.812.613.413.4-0.8

Comments on Variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits Completed or Planned: The ILO has an External Auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

International Organisation of La Francophonie

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Organisation of La Francophonie ( OIF ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: March 9, 1972

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's statutory contribution to the OIF is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to La Francophonie internationale and to provide it with a voice in the international community.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 27: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions13.414.012.314.414.4-2.1
Total Program13.414.012.314.414.4-2.1

Comments on Variances: The planned spending for 2013-14 represents the amount anticipated to be paid to the OIF in 2013 (the OIF’s fiscal year is the calendar year). The actual spending amount represents the payments made in 2013-14, which consist of the second half of the statutory payment for 2013 and the first half of the statutory payment for 2014. Another factor explaining the increase between planned and actual spending is the difference in the exchange rate, as it changed in the time between when the planned amount were calculated and the payment were actually made.

Audits Completed or Planned: The OIF has an external auditor. No audits have been conducted or planned by DFATD. Within the OIF, Canada’s role is to chair the Working Group on Financial Control Reforms. The goal of this group is to strengthen the internal audit function, in the context of modernizing the organization’s management.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: As part of its multilateral review exercise, the OIF was examined in 2013-14. The last evaluation prior to this exercise was in 2005-06.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

International Science and Technology Partnership Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Science and Technology Partnership Program (ISTPP) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: October 3, 2005

End Date: March 31, 2015

Description: TThe ISTPP is a “seed fund” that helps foster strategic international partnerships to accelerate the commercialization of research and development (R & D), leading to new market opportunities for Canadian businesses, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: International Services for Canadians — Canadians are satisfied with commercial and consular services.

Results Achieved:

R & D Capacity Building

Table 28: Program - International Commerce ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions2.02.06.46.45.11.3
Total Program2.02.06.46.45.11.3

Comments on Variances: Delays in the implementation of the program delayed the R & D projects, thus impacting project disbursement in 2013-14.

Audits Completed or Planned: An audit was completed in 2013-14.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: An evaluation was started in 2013-14 and will be completed by August 2014.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Evaluation scope includes feedback from recipients, recipients’ country partners, ultimate recipients and ultimate recipients’ country partners.

Investment Cooperation Program

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Investment Cooperation Program ( INC ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 4, 2010

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The INC assists private-sector firms registered in Canada with the cost of exploring investment opportunities in developing countries in order to reduce poverty and create sustainable employment and economic growth. The program does not finance the actual investment; rather, it provides support for activities surrounding an investment. Specifically, the program contributes up to 75 percent of the cost of studying an investment's viability, demonstrating and adapting appropriate technologies and undertaking activities aimed at making investments more sustainable, including public investments. The program is part of Canada's official development assistance for developing countries.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

The following are intermediate expected results to be achieved by INC-supported projects:

Table 29: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions3.85.320.09.71.518.5
Total Program3.85.320.09.71.518.5

Comments on Variances: The INC has been suspended since May 2012, and no new applications have been processed since that time. The only funding approved prior to the suspension of the program was for multi-year projects. This accounts for the variance between planned and actual spending.

Audits Completed or Planned: No internal audit of the program was conducted in 2013-14. The department conducted 15 recipient audits of the program in 2013-14.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: An evaluation of the program was completed in September 2012. It found that firms were making some progress toward the achievement of expected results. Approximately 31 percent of the surveyed firms that received viability funding had made investments equal to $8.3 million. In addition, 54 percent of the companies receiving viability funding indicated that they still planned to invest within the next year or two. Only two of the firms surveyed decided not to invest - one because of a regulatory issue within the developing country and the other due to a decision to focus their efforts on the U.S. market. The companies that already had existing investments used INC support to enhance those investments in areas such as improving the skills of their employees, establishing more reliable supply chains and developing methods to better engage with community groups.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A; applications for the program are not being accepted at this time.

North Atlantic Treaty Organization Civil Administration

Name of Transfer Payment Program: North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Civil Administration (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1989

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to NATO is a legally binding obligation of membership, based on the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty. Canada's contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding the administrative budget of NATO, an international organization vital to Canadian defence and security interests. NATO was designed to promote the stability of the North Atlantic area and to safeguard the freedom and security of its people by political and military means, based on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and international law. NATO's civil budget, structured along "output-based" lines in response to objectives set annually by the North Atlantic Council, covers the activities of NATO's secretary general, headquarters and international staff. The NATO civil administration supports the process of consensus building and decision making among alliance members and manages NATO's relations with its partners. NATO's civil budget also supports the work of various NATO agencies with specialized responsibilities. An effective and efficient NATO civil administration assists alliance members in promoting security and stability in the North Atlantic area and in responding effectively to current security challenges, particularly in Afghanistan and in the face of current and emerging threats in the Euro-Atlantic area. NATO accounts are subject to annual audit by the International Board of Auditors (IBAN) for NATO.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 30: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions23.924.430.132.632.6-2.5
Total Program23.924.430_132.632.6-2.5

Comments on Variances: Exchange rate fluctuations have had a significant impact on the actual spending versus the planned spending. A few other variables explain the variance in actual spending, namely: Canada's cost share of the NATO Civil Budget increased from 5.9358 percent in 2013 to 6.0905 percent in 2014, and pensions slightly increased in 2014. Additionally, NATO members did not reach consensus on the need to use the 2013 lapse credits to fund 2014 one-time requirements. As surpluses from previous years had been returned to nations, nations took the decision to “recall” an amount equivalent to previous years’ lapsed credits as part of 2014 first call in order to cover those one-time requirements incurred this year.

Audits Completed or Planned: The following elements are funded in whole or in part by the NATO Civil Budget and will be audited for 2013. Audits will be completed in 2014-15:

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development ( OECD ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: March 20, 1975

End Date: Ongoing

Description: To pay the assessed contribution required of Canada for its participation as a member of the OECD. The contribution pays for the OECD Secretariat (professionals and support staff who provide high-quality research and analysis) and maintenance of its headquarters, located in Paris.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 31: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions11.511.911.011.011.00.0
Total Program11.511.911.011.011.00.0

Comments on Variances: Planned spending is based on the previous year’s assessed contribution, increased by a small amount to reflect the inflation in France (the OECD is based in Paris), and is calculated in euros. Therefore, variances also occurred due to exchange rate fluctuations. Canada’s share of the budget changes annually, as it is based on a formula that takes into account a country’s three-year average Gross Domestic Product and population statistics.

Audits Completed or Planned: Audits are performed annually by both internal and external auditors, and OECD Members review the reports through both the Audit Committee and the Budget Committee. For more information, visit the OECD website.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe ( OSCE) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1993

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OSCE is an obligation arising from its commitments as one of the organization's 56 participating states. Canada's contribution furthers its foreign policy goals by funding programs implemented by the OSCE's institutions and field operations in priority foreign policy areas for Canada related to fundamental freedoms, fragile states, democratization and post-conflict development. It also contributes to effective global governance and international security and stability. The OSCE is a regional forum with a comprehensive and cooperative approach to security.

Canada's contribution to the organization's unified budget covers the costs associated with the implementation of the OSCE's work programs and activities in three areas of security and cooperation: 1) political and military; 2) economic and environmental; and 3) human rights and democratization. This integrated approach allows the OSCE to make a significant contribution to furthering European and Eurasian security and transatlantic cooperation through non-coercive measures. Canada's contribution also supports a stronger Canadian partnership in developing and implementing Canada's international security policy through the involvement of members of Parliament in the work of the OSCE Parliamentary Assembly, the deployment of Canadians to election observation missions, and the contribution of Canadian experts to the organization. The OSCE unified budget, based on a programmatic approach, is approved by the OSCE Permanent Council on a yearly basis.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 32: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions10.810.210.211.911.9-1.7
Total Program10.810.210.211.911.9-1.7

Comments on Variances: The OSCE budget is assessed in euros and per calendar year. Fluctuations in the exchange rate contributed to the variance between the planned spending and the actual spending. Unused funds are returned to Canada.

Audits Completed or Planned: OSCE’s accounts are subject to an annual report by external auditors, as well as an internal oversight annual report, both of which are made available to participating states. An independent Audit Committee also provides additional assessment by overseeing the work of both internal and external auditors. The OSCE financial statements for the 2013 calendar year, as reviewed by the External Auditor, will be available online in the coming months.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Organization of American States

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Organization of American States ( OAS) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: May 31, 1990

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Payment of Canada's annual assessed contribution to the OAS is a charter obligation of membership.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 33: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions17.59.69.610.410.4-0.8
Total Program17.59.69.610.410.4-0.8

Comments on Variances: The variance is due to currency fluctuations, as the amounts quoted above are expressed in Canadian dollars and payments are made in U.S. dollars.

Audits Completed or Planned: The OAS Board of External Auditors is an external audit committee charged with examining the accounts of the General Secretariat. The Board submits an annual report to the General Assembly.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Payments in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations' Property in Canada

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Payments in Lieu of Taxes on Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations' Property in Canada (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 18, 1979

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The Diplomatic, Consular and International Organizations' Property Grants Order (P.C.1979-59, January 18, 1979), the Municipal Grants Act, and successor orders and Acts form the statutory basis of this program. The related Memorandum of Understanding between the former Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada and Public Works and Government Services Canada, National Capital Region, establishes responsibilities and procedures governing the provision of services related to the payment of grants in lieu of real property and frontage or area taxes with respect to diplomatic and consular property. These procedures are designed to ensure fiscal and operational accountability while promoting efficient program delivery.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved: Canada's international commitments were met, as measured by: 1) the timely and accurate administration of payments to taxing authorities in Canada with respect to exempt properties owned by foreign states and; 2) the maintaining and expansion of the most favorable property tax exemption opportunities for Canadian missions abroad.

Table 34: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Grants13.412.813.513.513.00.5
Total Program13.412.813.513.513.00.5

Comments on Variances: The variance between the planned and actual spending is due to lower than anticipated municipal realty taxes. Changes in the volume and entitlement of grants are other factors in the year-end variance.

Audits Completed or Planned: N/A

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Projects and Development Activities Resulting from Francophonie Summits

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Projects and Development Activities Resulting from Francophonie Summits (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: March 9, 1979

End Date: Ongoing

Description: This program provides funding to cooperation programs and activities undertaken by the International Organisation of La Francophonie (OIF). It also provides financial support to the Government of New Brunswick to foster its participation in summits, ministerial conferences and other related La Francophonie activities. This program promotes Canadian interests and is consistent with Canada's political and economic objectives for La Francophonie.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

Table 35: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions8.37.68.08.78.7-0.7
Total Program8.37.68.08.78.7-0.7

Comments on Variances: The amount of planned spending in 2013-14 reflects the amount assigned to this fund in the 2013-14 budget. The increase of $0.7 million in the actual amount spent in 2013-14 is explained by: 1) an increase to the annual contribution made to the Government of New Brunswick (of $0.3 million since 2012-13); and 2) the use of 2013-14 funds to complete the payment to the OIF for the preceding year (2012-13), since the reimbursement of the 5-percent holdback from the IAE, representing $0.4 million, had not been claimed and could not be used in 2012-13.

Audits Completed or Planned: No audits have been conducted or are planned by DFATD. Within the OIF, Canada is president of the Working Group on Financial Control Reforms, whose goal is to strengthen the internal audit function, in the context of modernizing the organization’s management. The OIF has an external auditor.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: As part of its multilateral review exercise, the OIF was examined in 2013-14. The last evaluation prior to this exercise was in 2005-06.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

United Nations Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Organization ( UN ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The UN was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's assessed contribution to the regular budget of the United Nations (UN) is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Canada's foreign policy goals related to international peace, security and development and provide it with a voice in the international community. Assessed contributions are used to finance the organization's programs toward attainment of the UN's objectives, as set out in its Charter. For further information, please visit the United Nations website.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

For details on results achieved, please refer to section A/68/1 of the Report of the UN Secretary-General on the work of the Organization.

Table 36: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions83.582.290.989.589.51.4
Total Program 83.582.290.989.589.51.4

Comments on Variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are a factor.

Audits Completed or Planned: The United Nations Board of Auditors (UNBOA) was established in 1946. For more than 65 years, the heads of the Supreme Audit Institutions from the UN member states have provided independent, professional and quality audit services. The current UNBOA members are the Comptroller and Auditor General of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Comptroller and Auditor General of India, and the Controller and Auditor General of the United Republic of Tanzania. For more information, please consult the UNBOA reports, which are available on the UN website.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization ( UNESCO ) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: UNESCO was founded in 1945, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to UNESCO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to culture, science and education and provide it with a voice in the international community.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

The organization's program and budget, which sets out the strategic objectives and expected outcomes for the organization's work, are approved every two years by the UNESCO General Conference. For more details, please visit UNESCO website.

Table 37: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions11.710.311.411.611.5-0.1
Total Program11.710.311.411.611.5-0.1

Comments on Variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits Completed or Planned: UNESCO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

United Nations Peacekeeping Operations

Name of Transfer Payment Program: United Nations Peacekeeping Operations (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The UN was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: In accordance with the provisions of Article 17 of the Charter of the United Nations, every UN member state is legally obligated to pay its respective share toward peace operations. Thus, Canada's assessed contribution to UN peacekeeping operations is a legally binding obligation of membership.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

For more details, visit the UN Peacekeeping Operations.

Table 38: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions227.4197.0219.1215.3213.65.5
Total Program227.4197.0219.1215.3213.65.5

Comments on Variances: Assessed budgets for UN peacekeeping operations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits Completed or Planned: The UN Board of Auditors reviewed the operations and audited the accounts of UN peacekeeping operations for the financial period July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, through visits to UN Headquarters and to 16 active field missions, as well as via an examination of the accounts of 29 completed missions and four special-purpose accounts.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

World Health Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Health Organization (WHO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: The WHO was established in 1945, and Canada has been a member since its inception.

End Date: Ongoing

Description: Canada's annual assessed contribution to the WHO is a legally binding obligation of membership. The purpose of membership is to further the Government of Canada's foreign policy goals related to health and provide it with a voice in the international community.

Recipient is not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved:

The program and budget of the organization, which sets out the strategic objectives and expected outcomes for the organization's work, is approved every two years by the World Health Assembly. For additional details on results and plans, please visit the WHO Program Budget 2012-13: Performance Assessment and the WHO Program Budget 2014-15.

Table 39: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions15.214.815.415.115.10.3
Total Program15.214.815.415.115.10.3

Comments on Variances: Assessed budgets of international organizations are negotiated outcomes, and Canada is legally bound by the final outcome of these negotiations. Currency fluctuations are also a factor.

Audits Completed or Planned: The WHO has an external auditor and provides regular audited financial statements.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

World Trade Organization

Name of Transfer Payment Program: World Trade Organization ( WTO) (program funding approved by vote in Parliament)

Start Date: January 1, 1995

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The purpose of this program is to pay the assessed contribution for Canada's membership in the WTO. Canada's membership in the WTO helps to ensure that an international rules-based framework is maintained.

The WTO provides the only multilateral forum for negotiating market access and other trade rules. It also provides the best forum for monitoring the implementation of obligations and commitments under various trade agreements, reviewing members' trade policies and practices, and discussing trade-related issues that inhibit the free, fair and predictable flow of trade. The WTO is the only organization offering a state-to-state dispute settlement system whereby trade disputes are settled based on commonly agreed-on rules, rather than on political or economic power. Through these agreements, 160 WTO members operate a non-discriminatory trading system that spells out their rights and obligations. Each country receives guarantees that its exports will be treated fairly and consistently in other countries' markets. Each promises to do the same for imports into its own market.

Recipients are not required to repay funds obtained under this transfer payment program.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda—The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Results Achieved: As a trade-dependent country, Canada has been actively involved in all areas of the current round of WTO negotiations, known as the Doha Development Agenda.

The WTO annual report provides a comprehensive overview of WTO activities over the past year and includes information on the organization's budget and staffing.

Table 40: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions6.35.95.96.36.3-0.4
Total Program6.35.95.96.36.3-0.4

Comments on Variances: Canada’s contribution to the WTO budget is based on its share of world trade and it is calculated in Swiss francs. Planned spending was based on the best information available at the time. The actual spending represents the precise amount of the contribution that was calculated in late 2013 and converted into Canadian dollars at the time payment was made. The variance can be accounted for by the fluctuation of the exchange rate between the period when the estimate is prepared and the payment is disbursed.

Audits Completed or Planned: As a member of the WTO, Canada also has access to all audits, evaluations and performance reviews completed by or on behalf of the WTO.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: N/A

Engagement of applicants and recipients: N/A

Ex-Canadian International Development Agency

International Development Assistance

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Development Assistance

Start Date: 2001-2002

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The objective of this transfer payment program is to reduce poverty for those living in countries where DFATD engages in international development.

This objective is in line with the intent of the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act, which states that expenditures reported to Parliament as Official Development Assistance (ODA) must contribute to poverty reduction, take into account the perspectives of the poor and be consistent with international human rights standards. Furthermore, ODA may be provided for the purposes of alleviating the effects of a natural or man-made disaster or other emergency occurring outside Canada. DFATD is the lead department responsible for Canada's ODA. The majority of the department's activities are consistent with the Act. However, this program does not preclude activities falling outside the scope of the Act given stated limitations.

Strategic Outcome: International Development and Humanitarian Assistance — Reduction in poverty for those living in countries where DFATD engages in international development.

Results Achieved: In 2013-14, DFATD maintained international development programs as a priority. The international assistance program funding was directed towards many bilateral, multilateral and global engagement development programs. The program focused on program activity in 20 countries and has stayed mostly on track in meeting targets for 2015. In alignment with DFATD development priorities, programming focused on securing the future of children, increasing food security, increasing health care resources and stimulating sustainable economic growth.

Table 41: International Development Assistance ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
 ABCDEC - E
Program ActivityFragile countries and crisis-affected communities
Grants655.4498.0597.7869.4765.2-167_5
Contributions109.990.177.688.988.8-11.2
Total Program765.3588.1675.3958.3854.0-178.7
Program ActivityLow-income countries
Grants275.7304.7493.1236.9236.8256.3
Contributions471.6395.0387.8419.0418.7-30.9
Total Program747.3699.7880.9655.9655.5225.4
Program ActivityMiddle-income countries
Grants111.8112.1169.8131.4131.338.5
Contributions162.2145.2150.4174.6174.5-24.1
Total Program274.0257.3320.2306.0305.814.4
Program ActivityGlobal Engagement and Strategic Policy
Grants919.9818.3684.1778.1777.6-93.5
Contributions305.7239.93.94.54.5-0.6
Total Program1,225.61,058.2688.0782.6782.1-94.1
Program ActivityGlobal Engagement and Strategic Policy
Grants18.629.230.18.38.321.8
Contributions247.8227.9224.8221.6221.43.4
Total Program266.4257.1254.9229.9229.725.2
Total3,278.62,860.42,819.32,932.72,827.1-7_8

Comments on Variances be prograzm activity:

International Financial Institutions (IFIs)

Name of Transfer Payment Program: International Financial Institutions (IFIs), as per the International Development (Financial Institutions) Assistance Act.

Start Date: N/A

End Date: Ongoing

Description: One of DFATD’s main funding instruments for the IFIs is the issuance and encashment of promissory notes, which are funds that are given to the organization without any capital stock or subscriptions given in return. This funding enables the IFIs to finance their concessional funding windows for assistance to developing countries. Advances are made through the issuance of non-interest bearing, non-negotiable notes payable to the institutions, which become a statutory cash requirement upon encashment by the institution.

Strategic Outcome: International Development and Humanitarian Assistance — Reduction in poverty for those living in countries in which Canada engages in international development.

Results Achieved: Progress in global food security, health, education, and employment rates in developing countries. Through its contributions to international financial institutions, Canada and other donors have supported the following achievements in 2013-14:

Table 42: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions285.6247.9246.0244.5244.51.5
Total Program285.6247.9246.0244.5244.51.5

Comments on Variances: The variance ($1.5 million) between planned spending ($246 million) and actual spending ($244.5 million) is due to the following: 1) the payment to the Caribbean Development Bank’s Special Development Fund was originally planned at $17.585 million. A payment reduction of 5 percent ($0.88 million) was applied following a Ministerial Decision; and 2) the total initial planned amount was $245.351 million and rounded up to $246 million in the Main Estimates (variance of $0.65 million).

Audits Completed or Planned: The IFIs share their audited financial statements on a yearly basis as part of their Annual Reports.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: An evaluation was conducted on the African Development Bank in July 2013, and the results published in A Review of African Development Bank (AfDB) Program Evaluation Reporting. An evaluation on the Inter-American Development is currently under way and is expected to be completed by December 2014.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Canada plays an active role as a member of the boards of governors of the IFIs. Through its executive directors, it joins with other member countries to provide policy guidance and approve programs, policies and projects.

Advance Market Commitment for Pneumococcal Vaccine

Name of Transfer Payment Program: Advance Market Commitment (AMC) for Pneumococcal Vaccine.

Start Date: 2007

End Date: Ongoing

Description: The goal of the AMC for pneumococcal vaccine is to reduce the disease burden and mortality from pneumococcal disease in developing countries through a financial commitment by donors to purchase a vaccine to be developed against strains of pneumococcal disease prevalent in developing countries.

The total Canadian commitment to the AMC is US$200 million, as per the Budget and Economic Statement Implementation Act (2007). The payments for this project will be funded from a statutory vote from the Consolidated Revenue Fund, on an annual demand basis, under the authority of Section 144 of the Act.

Strategic Outcome: International Development and Humanitarian Assistance — Reduction in poverty for those living in countries in which Canada engages in international development.

Results Achieved: Since 2011, with Canadian and international support, the GAVI Alliance’s on AMC has been successful in immunizing millions of children against pneumonia in 40 developing countries. Between March 2013 and April 2014, 16 AMC-eligible countries introduced the pneumococcal vaccine, and a total of 58 million doses were produced and delivered.

Table 43: Program - Global Engagement and Strategic Policy ($ millions)
 Actual
spending
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
2013-14
Variance
Total Contributions22.924.40.017.017.0-17.0
Total Program22.924.40.017.017.0-17.0

Comments on Variances: AMC funds are provided under Bill C-48. The AMC is based on the pay-on-results principle, for which the value of the payment is only known and requested by the World Bank in July of each year. When the request is received, the value of payment is included in the Supplementary Estimates to obtain the authorities and then recorded in the Public Accounts of Canada. This explains the variance of $17 million between planned and actual spending.

The 2008 IAE-approved funding, which had an ongoing commitment of $17 million per year, cumulatively, was notionally allocated from the IAE for the AMC. This is a statutory payment coming directly from the Consolidated Revenue Fund and not from DFATD’s reference levels.

Audits Completed or Planned: Results from an audit performed in 2013 will be available in August 2014.

Evaluations Completed or Planned: The last evaluation was conducted in 2012, with results available in 2013. The next evaluation is planned at the beginning of 2015.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Canada works with a variety of partners to improve the lives of poor and vulnerable people in developing countries and produce timely and effective results. Canada's development partners include the following:

For more information, please consult Partners in Development.

Horizontal Initiatives

Global Peace and Security Fund

Name of Horizontal Initiative: Global Peace and Security Fund ( GPSF )

Name of Lead Department(s): Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada

Lead Department Program Activity: International Policy Advice and Integration / Diplomacy and Advocacy

Start Date: Operationalized on September 18, 2006

End Date: March 31, 2014

Total Federal Funding Allocation (from start date to end date): $1.13 billion

Description: : Sourced from the Peace and Security Pool of the International Assistance Envelope, the GPSF funds the operations of the Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START) and is used to conduct international assistance programming in fragile and conflict-affected states such as Afghanistan, Haiti and Sudan. START and the GPSF were originally created to fill a policy, institutional and funding gap between the former CIDA's humanitarian and long-term development assistance and military and training assistance from the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces (DND). START has played an effective role, establishing itself as a platform to facilitate whole-of-government engagement as well as policy development, where appropriate. . In recent years, other government departments, such as Public Safety Canada (PS), the RCMP, Correctional Service Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency and the Department of Justice Canada actively participated in stabilization and reconstruction initiatives as well as crisis response activities on behalf of START.

The GPSF programming provides timely, focused, effective and accountable international assistance in response to critical peace and security challenges that implicate Canadian interests and reflect Canadian foreign policy priorities. The GPSF programming also funds the deployment of public service experts, which enables DFATD to work closely with federal departments and agencies to provide beneficiary states and civilian components of multilateral peace operations with critical expertise in the areas of security and justice system reform.

Shared Outcome(s): The ultimate shared outcome is peace, security, and the safety and well-being of those living in priority fragile or conflict-affected states, through effective stabilization and reconstruction programming. Specific expected results are:

Governance Structure(s): The GPSF is managed by START. To ensure policy coherence and avoid duplication, various interdepartmental and intradepartmental committees are called upon as required to inform and guide emerging priority-setting exercises and implement Cabinet-mandated priorities in the whole-of-government context. START is located in the International Security Branch of DFATD, which is responsible for START's financial, human and physical resources.

Performance Highlights:

In response to the catastrophic impacts from Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines in November 2013, Canada mounted a rapid and multifaceted whole-of-government response, drawing upon every tool in its toolkit, including the deployment of experts from the Canadian Armed Forces Disaster Assistance Response Team, the Public Health Agency of Canada, the RCMP and DFATD. The 21st Annual Report to the Prime Minister on the Public Service of Canada highlighted Canada’s response to Typhoon Haiyan as a notable achievement. DND’s training support complemented START’s infrastructure support to the Peacekeeping Training Centre thereby increasing Canada’s capacity to respond to stabilization interventions in fragile states. The Canadian Police Arrangement, co-managed by PS, the RCMP and START, enabled the deployment of approximately 109 Canadian police officers to multilateral peace operations, including Afghanistan, Haiti and the West Bank, to improve the capacity, efficiency and effectiveness of national police services in these affected states, and the monthly reporting of these officers contributed to improved Canadian capacity to respond to global crises and reconstruction efforts.

Table 44: Global Peace and Security Fund
Federal PartnersFederal Partner Program ActivityNames of Programs for Federal PartnersTotal allocation (from start date to end date)($ millions)2013-14
($ millions)
Planned SpendingActual SpendingExpected ResultsResults Achieved
DFATDInternational Policy Advice and Integration
Diplomacy and Advocacy
International Policy Advice and Integration
Diplomacy and Advocacy
1,134.900.076.8Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations.

Strengthened institutions and civil society in affected states.

Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations.

Strengthened international frameworks for addressing crisis situations.
START led the whole-of-government conflict analysis that informed Canada's response to various crises, including those in Ukraine, Mali, the Sahel, the Central African Republic and South Sudan.

START, through CCC, provided rapid access to equipment, supplies and infrastructure needed for relief and/or reconstruction efforts in, for example, Haiti and Tanzania.

START demonstrated leadership in its ability to rapidly coordinate whole-of-government responses to natural disasters in the Philippines (typhoon).

START facilitated timely Canadian humanitarian contributions across key crises, including Mali and Ukraine, in line with Canadian interests and values.

START deployed 13 DFATD personnel to the IADB in Washington D.C.; to support the Global Dialogue on Iran, to Justice Rapid Response in Geneva; to the UN in New York in support of peacekeeping efforts in Africa; and to support the Government of the Philippines in response to Typhoon Haiyan in November 2013.

START advanced Canada’s leadership in global efforts to promote the role of women in international peace and security and end sexual violence in conflict by co-sponsoring and launching with G-8 members and other like-minded countries the G-8 Declaration, the UN Declaration, and UN Security Council resolution 2106 on preventing and responding to sexual violence. At the 2013 G-8 Foreign Ministers' Meeting, ministers endorsed a declaration and pledged a collective $35 million to prevent and respond to sexual violence (including a $5-million Canadian contribution). In 2013-14, DFATD’s GPSF has rolled out $2.7M of that allocation in various countries of focus.
DND and the Canadian ForcesN/AGlobal Peace and Operations Program 0.00.1Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations_

Strengthened institutions in affected states_
DND training specialists helped improve the quality of training provided by instructors at the Peacekeeping Training Centre (PTC) of the Tanzanian People’s Defence Force. DND training specialists conducted a 2-week “train-the-trainer” program based on needs identified by DND through the Military Training and Cooperation Program in early 2012. This was followed by a 2-week technical assistance visit in early 2014 to advise on planning, management and operation of the training centre.

DND’s training support complemented START’s infrastructure support to the PTC thereby increasing Canada’s capacity to respond to stabilization interventions in fragile states.
Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)Federal and International OperationsInternational Police Peacekeeping Program

Canadian Police Arrangement

Global Peace and Security Fund
 0.09.2Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations.

Strengthened international responses to specific crisis situations.

Strengthened institutions in affected states.
The Canadian Police Arrangement, co-managed by PS, the RCMP and START, enabled the deployment of approximately 109 Canadian police officers to multilateral peace operations, including Afghanistan, Haiti and the West Bank. It improved the capacity, efficiency and effectiveness of national police services in these affected states, and the monthly reporting contributed to improved Canadian capacity to respond to global crises and reconstruction efforts.

Through START’s Civilian Deployment Platform, the RCMP deployed 5 police officers to Chair the Independent Commission on Policing in the Philippines, to provide options to support opposition groups in Syria and to Haiti to assist the Haitian National Police with its forensic and fingerprint analysis.
Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC)

N/A

Delivery of International Assistance under the CCC/DFAIT Memorandum of Understanding 0.01.3Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations.The CCC’s efficient procurement of goods and services enabled START to provide rapid access to equipment, supplies and infrastructure needed for relief and/or reconstruction efforts in, for example, Haiti and Tanzania_
Correctional Service of Canada (CSC)Correctional InterventionsStabilization and reconstruction in Haiti 0.00.1Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations_

Strengthened institutions in affected states_
Through START’s Civilian Deployment Platform, CSC deployed a senior correctional officer to support the Office of Citizen Protection in Haiti. This deployment increased the skills and knowledge of Haitian correctional staff and management personnel on international detention standards and human rights and the quality of detention conditions for vulnerable populations in Haiti.
Department of Justice (DoJ)/Public ProsecutionsN/AStabilization and reconstruction 0.00.3Strengthened Canadian capacity to respond to crisis situations.

Strengthened institutions in affected states.
Through START’s Civilian Deployment Platform, DoJ deployed a Canadian prosecutor to the Office of the European Union's Special Prosecutor to examine allegations of organ trafficking committed by the people of Kosovo and Albanians, war crimes, and other serious crimes occurring in the aftermath of the 1999 war in Kosovo. This deployment increased the capacity of the EU Special Prosecutor’s office to investigate and prosecute offenders and to assist in bringing justice to the victims of such crimes.
Total1,134.900.0-87.8  

Comments on variances: :

The GPSF was scheduled to sunset on March 31, 2013. As such, there has been no planned spending until new programming authorities and funding were secured. The GPSF acquired authorities and funding for $60 million in Grants and Contribution in the 2013-14 Supplementary Estimates “B” after the RPP had already been published. Therefore, this variance is only accurate when compared to the 2013-14 RPP planned spending. The actual planned spending exercise was undertaken during the Streamlined CFO Attestation through Treasury Board and was appropriately costed using the TB-approved costing model.

Contact information:

Tamara Guttman
Director General
Stabilization and Reconstruction Task Force (START)
125 Sussex Ave, Ottawa ON
K10A 0G2
Phone: 343-203-2825
Email: tamara.guttman@international.gc.ca

Internal Audits and Evaluations

Internal Audits Table

Table 45: Internal Audits
Name of internal auditInternal audit typeStatusCompletion date
Ex-CIDA’s internal audits
Audit of Country Program Burkina FasoPerformance AuditCompletedMay 24, 2013
Audit of Governance of Information ManagementCompliance and Performance AuditCompletedMay 17, 2013
Audit of Contract ManagementAssurance Financial ManagementCompletedJuly 8, 2013
Audit of Compliance Work Force Adjustment DirectiveCompliance AuditCompletedMarch 3, 2014
Audit of Country Program UkrainePerformance AuditPlanning Phase Completed Delayed

 

Audit of Country Program MaliPerformance AuditIn progressJanuary 2015
Audit of OvertimeAssurance Financial ManagementCompletedSeptember 17, 2013
Audit of Management Control Framework for Country ProgramsAssurance ManagementCancelled after Preliminary Survey

 

Audit of Partnership with Canadians Branch — Call for Proposal ProcessAssurance OperationsCancelled after Preliminary Survey

 

Audit of Integrated Risk ManagementAssurance ManagementCancelled

 

Audit of External CommunicationsAssurance OperationsCancelled

 

Audit of the Specified Procedures on the Departmental Financial StatementsAssurance Financial ManagementIn progressAugust 29, 2014
Ex-DFAIT’s Internal Audits
Audit of Diplomatic Mail ServicesAssurance OperationsCompletedApril 24, 2013
Audit of Moscow APEC Summit OvertimeAssurance Management of HRCompletedMay 8, 2013
Audit of Copenhagen MissionAssurance Financial ManagementCompletedJanuary 30, 2013
Mission SecurityAssurance OperationsCompletedOctober 9, 2013
Cash and Handling ControlsAssurance Financial ManagementCompletedJuly 16, 2013
Audit of International Science Technology Partnerships ProgramAssurance OperationsCompletedMay 8, 2013
Audit of Note 3 to the 2012-2013 Financial StatementsAssurance Financial ManagementCompletedJuly 22, 2013
Audit of Specific Procedures on the 2012-2013 Financial StatementsAssurance Financial ManagementCompletedJuly 30, 2013
Audit of International Platform Service Delivery to Canada’s Network Abroad (Previously named: Audit of Common Services Delivery)Financial Management and Monitoring ControlsIn progressJuly 2014
Audit of Management of Leave and Overtime for Canada-Based StaffAssurance Management of HRIn progressJuly 2014
Audit of Management of Locally Engaged Staff (LES) CompensationAssurance AuditIn progressJuly 2014
Audit of Emergency ManagementAssurance OperationsDelayed

 

Evaluations Table

Table 46: Evaluations
Name of evaluationProgramStatusCompletion date
3 Joint evaluation with the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, who has provided a donor-neutral version of the Review of UNICEF’s Development Effectiveness report.
Ex-CIDA’s Evaluations
Mali Country Program Evaluation 2006-2007 – 2010-2011 - Synthesis ReportLow-income CountriesCompletedFebruary 3, 2014
Partnership with Canadians Governance Program Evaluation Canadian engagement for DevelopmentCompletedFebruary 6, 2014
A Review of Program Evaluation Reporting - African Development Bank 2007-2012 Global Engagement and Strategic PolicyCompletedOctober 16,2013
Development Effectiveness Review of the United Nations Children's FundFootnote 3Global Engagement and Strategic PolicyPending approvalFall 2014
Bolivia Country Program EvaluationMiddle-income CountriesPending approvalFall 2014
Haïti Country Program EvaluationFragile Countries and Crisis-affected CommunitiesPending approvalFall 2014
Pakistan Country Program EvaluationLow-income CountriesPending approvalFall 2015
Development effectiveness review of Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)Global Engagement and Strategic PolicyPending approvalFall 2014
Development effectiveness review of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)Global Engagement and Strategic PolicyPending approvalFall 2014
Summative Evaluation of Canada’s Afghanistan Development ProgramFragile Countries and Crisis-affected CommunitiesIn progressWinter 2015
West-Bank and Gaza Country Program EvaluationFragile Countries and Crisis-affected CommunitiesIn progressWinter 2015
Mozambique/Tanzania Countries Program EvaluationLow-income CountriesIn progressWinter 2015
Ethiopia/Ghana Country Program EvaluationLow-income CountriesIn progressWinter 2015
Indonesia Country Program EvaluationLow-income CountriesIn progressWinter 2015
Meta-evaluation of Branch-led EvaluationsOrganization-wideIn progress2014-15
Partners for Development Program EvaluationCanadian Engagement for Development-wideIn progressFall 2015
Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Formative EvaluationOrganization-wideIn progressFall 2015
Ex-DFAIT’s Evaluations
Global Partnership ProgramsDiplomacy and AdvocacyCompletedJanuary 2013
State of Performance Measurement at DFATDN/ACompletedJune 24, 2013
Global Security Reporting ProgramGovernance, Strategic Direction & Common Service DeliveryCompletedFebruary 20, 2014
Regional Service CentresGovernance, Strategic Direction & Common Service DeliveryPending approvalJune 20, 2014
Corporate Social ResponsibilityInternational CommercePending approvalExpected Approval October 2014
Canada Foreign Service InstituteGovernance, Strategic Direction & Common Service DeliveryPending approvalExpected Approval October 2014
UN Small GrantsDiplomacy and AdvocacyPending approvalExpected Approval October 2014
International Science and Technology Partnerships ProgramInternational CommerceIn progressExpected Approval October 2014
Global Commerce Support ProgramInternational CommerceIn progressExpected Approval October 2014

To read the full reports, visit Evaluation Reports.

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees: • Not applicable

Response to the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

Office of the Auditor General (OAG):

1) Spring 2013 Report of the Auditor General of Canada: Chapter 4 - Official Development Assistance through Multilateral Organizations

This audit relates to the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act (2008) and resulting Official Development Assistance (ODA). ODA contributes to poverty reduction in developing countries, maintaining international human rights standards. While the ODA involves more than a dozen federal departments, the audit focused largely on the federal organizations that account for more than 90 percent of the government’s ODA spending. Key areas of focus were the extents to which departments’ funding of multilateral organizations reflect government international assistance priorities and compliance with the Official Development Assistance Accountability Act. To read the full report and the department’s response, please consult Chapter 4—Official Development Assistance through Multilateral Organizations.

2) Fall 2013 Report of the Auditor General of Canada: Chapter 1 - Follow-up Audit on Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting

Under the audited departmental financial statements initiative, large departments began work in 2005 to ensure effective internal controls over financial reporting. OAG audits, undertaken in 2006 and 2011, determined progress in this area to be unsatisfactory. In this follow-up audit, progress was examined in seven previously audited departments, as well as the effectiveness of the Treasury Board Secretariat and the Office of the Comptroller General in their respective roles of reviewing and monitoring departmental progress. To read the full report and the department’s response, please consult Chapter 1- Follow-up Audit on Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting.

Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development:

1) 2013 Fall Report of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development: Chapter 9 – Environmental Petitions

The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development administers the environmental petitions process on behalf of the Auditor General. In addition to a monitoring and reporting role, the Commissioner posts petitions and responses on the Internet and carries out outreach activities. The purpose of this report was to inform Parliament and Canadians about the number, nature and status of petitions and responses received between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013, as required by section 23 of the Auditor General Act. The report noted that the former DFAIT had received one complaint and had addressed it within the required time period. To read the report and the department’s response, please consult Chapter 9 – Environmental Petitions.

External audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

Not applicable

Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenue

Sources of Respendable Revenue

Table 47: Sources of Respendable Revenue
Program2011-12
Actual
($ millions)
2012-13
Actual
($ millions)
2013-14 ($ millions)
Main
Estimates
Planned
Revenue
Total
Authorities
Actual
Diplomacy and Advocacy
International youth exchange10.010.414.014.014.03.5
International Commerce
Trade fairs and missions0.00.03.13.13.10.0
Consular Services and Emergency Management
Specialized consular service fees3.53.24.34.34.33.0
Governance, Strategic Direction and Common Service Delivery
Real property services abroad (co-location)21.323.524.024.025.031.1
Real property services abroad0.52.34.94.94.940.6
Training services by CFSI6.03.38.08.08.01.2
International telecommunication services5.10.81.11.11.10.7
Total Respendable Revenue46.443.559.459.460.480.1

Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue

Table 48: Sources of Non-Respendable Revenue
Program2011-12
Actual
($ millions)
2012-13
Actual
($ millions)
2013-14
($ millions)
Planned
Revenue
Actual
International Policy Advice and Integration
Refund of previous years’ expenditures0.80.00.00.3
Diplomacy and Advocacy
Refund of previous years’ expenditures4.80.00.01.9
International Commerce
Import and export permit fees2.52.62.42.8
Contributions repaid under the Program for Export Market Development0.00.00.02.6
Refund of previous years’ expenditures1.10.00.01.2
Consular Services and Emergency Management
Consular Services and emergency Management97.5104.794.7100.8
Fragile Countries and Crisis-affected Communities
Refund of previous years’ expenditures1.42.20.01.3
Low-income Countries
Refund of previous years’ expenditures2.83.30.02.7
Return on investments0.41.00.00.6
Middle-income Countries
Refund of previous years’ expenditures1.81.90.04.2
Return on investments2.32.32.32.3
Miscellaneous0.20.00.00.0
Global Engagement and Strategic Policy
Gains for revaluation at year-end of International Financial Institution liabilities20.114.90.075.7
Refund of previous years’ expenditures2.00.20.00.1
Return on investments0.01.11.51_6
Canadian Engagement
Refund of previous years’ expenditures-0.50.00.00.7
Miscellaneous0.10.20.30.0
Governance, Strategic Direction & Common Service Delivery
Employee rent shares19.218.825.417.0
Services provided to the passport office4.34.34.44.3
Refund of previous years’ expenditures11.40.00.05.9
Sales of real property55.211.420.0572.3
Government of Canada Benefits
Refund of previous years’ expenditures0.00.00.00.2
Internal Services
Refund of previous years’ expenditures0.30.20.00.4
Total Non-Respendable Revenue227.7169.0151.0799.2

Up-Front Multi-Year Funding

Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

Name of Recipient: Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

Start Date: January 30, 2003

End Date: Ongoing

Total Funding: $30 million

Description: The CIGI supports world-leading research in the area of global governance, particularly in the areas of global economy, global security and politics, and most recently international law. It furthers Canada's interests in a stable and well-governed global system by bringing together academics, policy analysts and researchers from around the world to discuss and carry out research on current topics and trends. In 2003, the Government of Canada contributed $30 million, which was matched by the CIGI and private donors, to establish an endowment fund. The Centre continues to be funded by the proceeds of this endowment and other draw-down sources of revenue from the Government of Ontario and private donors.

Strategic Outcome: Canada's International Agenda — The international agenda is shaped to Canada's benefit and advantage in accordance with Canadian interests and values.

Summary of Results Achieved by the recipient:

Table 49: Program - Diplomacy and Advocacy ($ millions)
2011-12
Actual
spending
2012-13
Actual
spending
2013-14
Planned
spending
2013-14
Total
authorities
2013-14
Actual
spending
Variance
0.00.00.00.00.00.0

Comments on Variance(s): N/A

Significant Evaluation findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plans: An independent evaluation of the CIGI was conducted in 2013 covering the five-year period from 2008 to 2013, in accordance with the requirements of the 2003 Federal Funding Agreement. The evaluation results showed that the CIGI is progressing toward its planned long-term outcomes and is managing its research budget carefully, producing a reasonable set of outputs and outcomes, and that the CIGI has strengthened its presence in Canada and elsewhere. In 2013, the Government of Ontario contributed $30 million, which was matched by the CIGI, to establish the International Law Research Program as a ten-year, integrated and multi-disciplinary research and teaching program to develop world-class intellectual strength and position Canada to play a dynamic role in shaping global rules—especially in the areas of intellectual property law, economic and investment law, and environmental law and treaties. The next CIGI strategic plan (2015-2020) will be completed in late 2014.

Significant Audit findings by the recipient during the reporting year and future plans: CIGI publishes an annual report of its activities that includes financial statements. To read the 2013 report, please visit CIGI’s website.

Link to recipient's website: http://www.cigionline.org/

User Fees Tables

Access to Information

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

User Fee: Access to Information Act (ATIA) fees

Fee Type: Other Products and Services (O)

Fee-setting Authority: ATIA section 11 and section 7 of the Access to Information Regulations

Year Last Modified: 1992

Performance Standards: Response provided within 30 days following receipt of request; the response time may be extended pursuant to section 9 of the Access to Information Act. A notice of extension is sent to the requester within 30 days after receipt of request. For more information, please consult the Access to Information Act.

Performance Results: The department was able to respond within 30 days or less in 63.2 percent of completed cases.

Table 50: Access to Information - User Fees
2013-14 ($ thousands)Planning years ($ thousands)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
10.08.15,036.02014-1510.05,876.0
2015-1610.05,876.0
2016-1710.05,876.0

*Note: The following provides the totals of actual revenues and full costs (not rounded) incurred by DFATD, DFAIT and CIDA in 2013-14:

Other Information: Estimated full cost is based on projected staffing of up to 63 full-time employees. Due to staffing shortages within the ATIP community, the strike by foreign service officers, as well as the DFAIT and CIDA amalgamation, DFATD’s performance for ATIP requests for fiscal year 2013-14 has trended down.

International Experience Canada

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

User Fee: Any national of a foreign state who applies to enter Canada under the International Experience Canada (IEC) shall, if the application is approved, pay a participation fee of $150.

Fee Type: Regulatory—Program Participation Fee (PPF)

Fee-setting Authority: Order JUS-609929 amending the Order-in-Council P.C. 2000-1723 of November 30, 2000, made pursuant to paragraph 19(1)(b) of the Financial Administration Act

Year Last Modified:October 3, 2007

Performance Standards: All routine IEC applications that are received at Canadian missions in participating countries are processed within eight weeks.

Performance Results: 94.4% of complete routine applications were processed within eight weeks from January 1st to August 31, 2013.

Table 51: International Experience Canada - User Fees
2013-14 ($ thousand)Planning years ($ thousand)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
4,0003,4553,9882014-15NANA
2015-16NANA
2016-17NANA

Other Information: As of August 31, 2013, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) is responsible for the IEC program.

External Fees: (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)

External fee: Any national of a foreign state who applies to enter Canada under the International Experience Canada program shall, if the application is approved, pay a fee of $150.

Service standard: Routine IEC applications that are received at Canadian missions in participating countries are processed within eight weeks.

Performance results: Between January 1 and August 31, 2013, 94.4% of routine applications were processed within eight weeks.

Stakeholder consultation: Ipsos Reid conducted interviews concerning the implementation of fees with 25 stakeholders, including non-governmental organizations, staff at DFAITD headquarters and missions abroad, CIC, and foreign government stakeholders. Overall stakeholder reaction to user fees was positive.

Other Information: Service standards will be reviewed in 2015-16 to reflect the new online application and processing system that will be implemented starting in 2016.

Export/Import Permit Fees

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

User Fee: Fees for the issuance of export and import certificates and permits

Fee Type: Other products and services (O)

Fee-setting Authority: Export and Import Permits Act and Export and Import Permits and Certificates Fees Order

Year Last Modified: May 19, 1995

Performance Standards: Deliver non-strategic, non-routed import and export permits within 15 minutes of the time of application; process within four business hours permit applications that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers or that have been flagged for an officer's review by the applicant when no additional information or documentation is required; process within three business days permit applications for BC Logs that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers; process within five business days permit applications for firearms that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers.

Performance Results: 94-percent success rate on the processing of over 431,000 applications, including the issuance of 325,000 export/import permits, surpassing the service standard of 90 percent in 2013-14.

Table 52: Export/Import Permit Fees
2013-14 ($ thousands)Planning years ($ thousands)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
2,4002,8326,8152014-152,4006,900
2015-162,4006,900
2016-172,4006,900

Other Information: N/A

External Fees: (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)

External fee: Fees for the issuance of export and import certificates and permits

Service standard: Deliver non-strategic, non-routed import and export permits within 15 minutes of the time of application; process within four business hours permit applications that are automatically redirected (routed) to departmental officers or that have been flagged for an officer's review by the applicant when no additional information or documentation is required.

Performance results: 94% success rate on the processing of over 431,000 applications (325,000 export/import permits issued).

Stakeholder consultation: The department's consultative bodies provide ongoing input on behalf of stakeholders with respect to certain trade controls, as well as regular outreach and specific consultations with associations and companies with respect to export controls for strategic goods.

Other Information: N/A

Consular Services

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

User Fee: Consular Service Fee

Fee Type: Other products and services (O)

Fee-setting Authority: Consular Service Fee Regulations pursuant to the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Act

Year Last Modified: The Consular Service Fee was introduced on November 8, 1995, and has not been modified.

Performance Standards: Consular Services performance standards are grouped under the following service standards categories:

  1. Protection and Assistance
  2. Contact with Prisoners
  3. Passports and Citizenship
  4. Information-Canada/Third Countries
  5. Information-Local
  6. Legal and Notary

For more information, please consult the Service standards website.

Consular services are provided to Canadians 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at more than 260 points of service around the world. Outside regular business hours, calls are forwarded to the Emergency Watch and Response Centre in Ottawa. Emergency situations are dealt with immediately.

Every effort is made to obtain solutions for specific problems and to provide the required service. However, the department's ability to do so and its success are conditioned, in many instances, by the laws and regulations of other countries as well as the quality and level of cooperation offered by persons and organizations outside the Government of Canada.

Performance Results: Of the 3,447 Canadians who completed a Client Feedback Form in 2013-14, 96 percent reported that they were satisfied or very satisfied with the services received. The department also reports on performance against passport, citizenship and arrest/detention service standards. This information for 2013-14 is noted below.

Canada’s missions abroad are asked to make regular contact with long-term Canadian detainees. The frequency of contact reflects local conditions: once every three months (e.g. in much of Latin America, Africa and Asia), once every six months (e.g. in much of Western Europe) or once every 12 months (e.g. in the United States, where over 70 percent of these detainees are located). As of March 31, 2014, missions met this standard 95 percent of the time. Missions are asked to report on their ability to accept, review and forward citizenship applications to Canada within the 10-day service standard. During 2013-14, they did so successfully with 93 percent of the applications. Missions are monitored for their ability to meet the 15-day service standard for passport issuance. They met this standard 98 percent of the time.

Table 53: Consular Service Fee
2013-14 ($ thousand)Planning years ($ thousand)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
107,380100,802124,8402014-15103,493126,711
2015-16106,576128,610
2016-17108,260130,537

Other Information: N/A

External Fees: (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)

External fee: Consular Services Fee

Service standard: Consular services are based on written service standards (established in 1995), which detail the services to be provided, along with qualitative and quantitative standards to be used by employees. The service standards are available at Service Standards (http://travel.gc.ca/about/assistance/consular/standards) as well as at all missions abroad, where they are either in public view or can be provided by employees.

Consular services are provided to Canadians 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at more than 260 points of service around the world. Outside regular business hours, calls are forwarded to the Emergency Operations Centre in Ottawa. Emergency situations are dealt with immediately.

Performance results: See above performance results.

Stakeholder consultation: The consular service standards were developed following consultations with Canadians at some 80 missions abroad and with selected clients in Canada. Surveys were also conducted at the international airports in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.

Other Information: N/A

Specialized Consular Services

User Fees and Regulatory Charges (User Fees Act)

User Fee: Specialized Consular Services Fee

Fee Type: Other products and services (O)

Fee-setting Authority: Consular Fee (Specialized Services) Regulations, pursuant to paragraph 19 (1)(a) of the Financial Administration Act

Date Last Modified: June 3, 2010

Performance Standards: Specialized Consular Services performance standards are grouped under the following service standards categories:

Protection and Assistance

Legal and Notary

For the complete list of service standards, please consult Consular Services: Service Standards.

Performance Results: 92 percent of 147 clients reported overall satisfaction with the legal and notary services they received.

Table 54: Specialized Consular Services Fee
2013-14 ($ thousand)Planning Years ($ thousand)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
3,6873,0374,0442014-153,4524,104
2015-163,4524,166
2016-173,4524,228

Other Information: N/A

External Fees: (Policy on Service Standards for External Fees)

External fee: Specialized Consular Services Fee

Service standard: These standards are available at Service Standards Consular services: Service Standards and at all Canadian missions abroad. Clients are invited to comment if they did not receive the level of service they expected or if they wish to make suggestions.

Performance results: Feedback from 147 clients indicates an overall satisfaction rate of 92% with legal and notary services received.

Stakeholder consultation: The consular service standards were developed following consultations with Canadians at some 80 missions around the world as well as with selected clients in Canada. Surveys were also conducted at the international airports in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.

User Fee Reporting Totals

Table 55: User Fee Reporting Totals
2013-14 ($ thousands)Planning years ($ thousands)
Forecast revenueActual revenueFull costFiscal yearForecast revenueEstimated full cost
Subtotal Regulatory
(International Experience Canada
4,0003,4553,9882014-15NANA
2015-16NANA
2016-17NANA
Subtotal Other Products and Services
(Access to Information and Privacy; Import/Export; Consular and Specialized Consular Services)
113,477106,679.1140,7352014-15109,355143,591
2015-16112,438145,552
2016-17114,122147,541
Total117,477110,134.1144,7232014-15109,355143,591
2015-16112,438145,552
2015-16114,122147,541
Date Modified: