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Initial Strategic  Environmental Assessment Report  of the Canada-Central America Four Free Trade  Negotiations (El Salvador,  Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua)

Executive Summary
1. Introduction
2. Methodology
3. Background
4. Initial Environmental Assessment Findings
4.1 Expected Economic Impact
4.2 Likely Environmental Impact and Significance of Expected Economic Changes
5. Enhancement and Mitigation Options
6. Conclusion

Statistical Appendix

Executive Summary

On November 21, 2001, the Minister for International Trade announced Canada’s participation in negotiations towards a free trade agreement with El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In keeping with the Framework for Conducting Environmental Assessments of Trade Negotiations, an environmental assessment (EA) of the Canada–Central America Four (Canada–CA-4) free trade negotiations is being conducted to assist Canada’s negotiators in addressing potential environmental issues affecting Canada pertaining to the free trade agreement (FTA).

In absolute terms, economic relations between Canada and the CA-4 are modest. In 2002 merchandise imports and exports accounted for approximately 0.11% and 0.05% of Canada’s total trade, respectively. Canada’s services exports to the region are estimated at $57 million, and imports at $20 million. Canadian investment in the CA-4 countries stands at approximately $209 million. CA-4 investments in Canada are negligible. Despite these small figures, however, growth has occurred over the last decade as the CA-4 countries stabilize and enact economic reforms.  The FTA would create conditions for even further increases benefiting, in particular, small and medium-sized Canadian firms.

Canada’s relationship with the CA-4 has been built upon a strong commitment to supporting development and aid programs. It is anticipated that the Canada–CA-4 trade negotiations will continue to build upon Canada’s work in developing and supporting social and environmental initiatives through strengthened economic and political cooperation.

While a number of products indicate a potential for export growth flowing from FTA, likely environmental impacts for Canada were not deemed to be significant due to the relatively small size of trade flows between Canada and the CA-4. Currently, trade in services and investment is modest and is not likely to increase in a significant manner, in absolute terms, as a result of the FTA. No significant environmental impact is expected from potential increases in services trade or in investment.

1. Introduction

On November 21, 2001, the Minister for International Trade announced the launch of free trade negotiations with El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua with the intent of establishing the Canada–Central America Four (Canada–CA-4) Free Trade Agreement. Parallel side agreements on labour and the environment are also being negotiated. These side agreements are intended to help
ensure that trade liberalisation is not achieved at the expense of good labour or environmental practices.

Guided by the 1999 Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, and the Framework for Environmental Assessment of Trade Negotiations (the Framework), released by the Government of Canada in February 2001, an environmental assessment (EA) is being conducted to support the negotiations of the trade agreement.

The Framework outlines the process used to assess potential environmental impacts on Canada of proposed trade agreements. Findings of the EA are used to inform the negotiations, so environmental considerations are integrated into the policy development stages. This process also helps to address public concerns regarding the consideration of environmental factors during the negotiation of trade agreements.

The EA process consists of three main phases: the Initial EA phase, the Draft EA phase, and the Final EA phase. The initial EA phase is carried out for all negotiations, and identifies the main environmental issues expected to arise as a result of the negotiations. The Draft EA phase elaborates on the initial EA report by providing a more thorough examination and assessment of environmental impacts of the trade negotiations. The final EA report details the outcome of the negotiations as related to the EA process. Any new information related to the EA process and trade negotiations is provided in the final EA report, as well as mitigation and enhancement options. In the event that the Initial EA report does not identify likely or significant environmental impacts, the full EA process is not required. In such a circumstance, the findings would be documented and publicized in the Initial EA report and the public would be invited to provide comments. No further action would be pursued unless new information became available that warranted such action.

The EA process is intended to look at the "likeliness" and "significance" of domestic impacts of trade liberalization on both (1) the natural environment, and (2) on policy-making as a result of changes in trade rules. Therefore, any areas under negotiation that touch on how policy instruments are developed at the domestic level will be kept under analysis.

This report documents the findings of the Initial EA phase to the Canada–CA-4 negotiations. It consists of a cursory application of the analytical methodology designed in the Framework and acts as a screening process to identify the main environmental issues expected to arise as a result of the expected outcome of this free trade initiative.

The Government of Canada welcomes comments on this Initial EA. Feedback on the analysis of the economic relevance of new negotiations and the initial assessment of the likelihood and significance of resultant environmental impacts is welcome, as well as comments on opportunities to mitigate any negative environmental impacts, and to enhance any positive effects, as may already be identified at this stage. Comments on this document can be sent to: mailto:consultations@international.gc.ca.

2. Methodology

The Initial EA follows the process outlined in the Framework. Since the final outcome of the agreement is unknown, the assessment is a ‘forecasting’ or ‘anticipatory’ exercise, conducted with limited empirical data. Such an analysis allows for the early clarification of national goals and priorities with respect to trade and environmental interests, and for the early identification of any mitigation and enhancement options that can be incorporated into the negotiations.

The steps of this study are:

  1. Identification of likely economic effects for Canada that will result from the trade agreement;
  2. Identification and assessment of the significance of likely environmental effects (both positive and negative) within Canada; and
  3. Identification of enhancement/mitigation options for any positive/negative environmental impacts to inform the negotiations.

This strategic environmental assessment and is intended to inform the decision-making process as the agreement is being negotiated. Consequently, there is a fair degree of uncertainty associated with identifying likely economic and environmental impacts. The Canada-CA-4 FTA negotiations are expected to be completed in 2003.  No date of entry into force has yet been set. Some of the FTA’s provisions may be phased-in over a 5 to 10 year period. The latest data available at the time of drafting (2000-2002) is used as a baseline for the economic analysis.

3. Background

Throughout the past century the CA-4 countries have witnessed a number of social, political, economic and environmental challenges that have constrained the region’s development. Civil unrest has plagued all four countries during this period and has resulted in a lack of long-term political stability.

Earthquakes, hurricanes and mudslides have also affected Central America, further exacerbating existing development challenges. Hurricane Mitch in 1998 was particularly devastating to all four countries resulting in widespread infrastructure and ecological damage. Extensive rains followed Hurricane Mitch that in combination with denuded land from commercial clear cutting throughout the region resulted in a series of mudslides throughout Honduras and Nicaragua raising the death toll to an estimated 10,000 throughout the region.

As a result of such civil and environmental turbulence, all four countries have relied heavily on foreign aid. Through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)1 Canada has sponsored projects to improve water and sanitation quality, agricultural and forest management practices, as well as to reduce poverty and to foster human rights and democratic reforms. In total, Canada contributes roughly $63 million annually to the CA-4 through development programs and financial aid. The aid distribution breakdown for the CA-4 is 12% for El Salvador, 13% for Guatemala, 49% for Honduras and 26% for Nicaragua.

An agreement with the CA4 will seek to eliminate tariffs on key Canadian exports and otherwise secure preferential access for Canadian businesses to the CA4 markets. It will also include substantive provisions in the areas of services and investment. Additionally, negotiators will work at increasing co-operation with the CA4 to make trade procedures more efficient. Parallel cooperation agreements to address labour and environmental issues are also being pursued.

With respect to trade, Canada’s relationship with the CA-4 has traditionally been small in absolute terms. Throughout the past seven years, however, Canada has been expanding its trade in the region. From 1995 to 2002, Canada’s two-way trade with the CA-4 countries almost doubled from $291 to $560 million. In this period, Canadian exports to these countries doubled, while imports grew by 89%.

Nonetheless, trade with CA-4 countries still constitutes a very small percentage of Canada’s total trade (see Table 1). This is perhaps best recognized when one considers that Canada’s total annual trade with the CA-4 is equivalent to roughly one-third of one day in trade between Canada and the United States.

Table 1

For 2002

Canadian Imports

Canadian Exports

El Salvador

0.02%

0.01%

Guatemala

0.04%

0.03%

Honduras

0.04%

0.004%

Nicaragua

0.01%

0.003%

Total

0.11%

0.05%

Source: Statistics Canada, World Trade Atlas

Canada’s main export items to the CA-4 include wheat, telecommunications equipment, newsprint and other paper products, potash, processed foods, meat, fats and oils, fruits and vegetables and plastics. Imports from the CA-4 have traditionally consisted of fruits and vegetables, clothing, sugar, electronic components, tobacco and coffee. The following tables will outline Canada’s top 5 imports and exports in 2002 with each of the four countries.

Table 2: Canada - El Salvador
 

Imports

% of Imports

Exports

% of Exports

1

Knit Apparel

65.8%

Paper, Paperboard

23.9%

2

Spices, Coffee, Teas

17.7%

Cereals

22.4%

3

Electrical Machinery

5.4%

Machinery

14.4%

4

Woven Apparel

4.7%

Milling, Malt, Starch

9.4%

5

Misc. Textile Articles

2%

Plastic

7.1%

 

Total for top 5

95.6%

Total for top 5

77.2%

 

Table 3: Canada - Guatemala
 

Imports

% of Imports

Exports

% of Exports

1

Spices, Coffee and Tea

26.9%

Cereals

48.8%

2

Edible Fruit and Nuts

23.6%

Paper, Paperboard

14.8%

3

Sugars

21.6%

Fertilizers

7.6%

4

Knit Apparel

10.2%

Preserved Food

4.6%

5

Vegetables

5%

Plastic

3.6%

 

Total for top 5

87.3%

Total for top 5

79.4%

Table 4: Canada - Honduras
 

Imports

% of Imports

Exports

% of Exports

1

Knit Apparel

47.3%

Paper, Paperboard

38.6%

2

Edible Fruits and Nuts

20.4%

Machinery

17.7%

3

Woven Apparel

9.4%

Fertilizers

14.6%

4

Sugars

8.3%

Automotive Products

7.5%

5

Spices, Coffee and Tea

3.4%

Preserved Food

5.3%

 

Total for top 5

88.8%

Total for top 5

83.7%


Table 5: Canada - Nicaragua
 

Imports

% of Imports

Exports

% of Exports

1

Precious Stones, Metals

58%

Machinery

25.8%

2

Misc. Grain, Seeds, Nuts

14.3%

Plastic

18.9%

3

Woven Apparel

12.5%

Pharmaceuticals

11.8%

4

Spices, Coffee and Tea

10.5%

Paper and Paperboard

11.4%

5

Fish and Seafood

1.6%

Milling, Malt, Starch

9.5%

 

Total for top 5

96.9%

Total for top 5

77.4%

Source: Statistics Canada, World Trade Atlas

Canada’s trade in services with the CA-4 countries is also relatively small. In 2002, Canada exported
$49 million worth of services to these countries, and imported $28 million. The three primary service sectors Canada currently exports to Central America consist of professional, telecommunications and financial services. The CA-4 countries’ largest service export to Canada is tourism.

While trade in services is not subject to a tariff charge per se, non-tariff or regulatory barriers still exist and their removal or reduction is one of the objectives of the FTA.  Some of these restrictions involve citizenship or residency requirements, CA-4 ownership or management controls or rights to access requirements with local business (e.g. use of existing telecommunications infrastructure).

In 2000, Canadian direct foreign investment in the region was approximately $209 million while direct investment of the CA-4 into Canada is virtually nonexistent. In March 1998, Canada signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Trade and Investment with Central America to enhance our economic relations with the region. The inclusion of substantive investment rules in the FTA would provide more certainty and predictability as well as better protection for Canadian investors.

It is therefore expected that the Canada-CA-4 FTA will enhance the trade and economic ties between Canada and the CA-4. Additionally, these negotiations will also build upon Canada’s development role with the CA-4 and strengthen the four countries’ economy through a safer and more stable business climate and healthier environment. This, in part, contributes to the larger goals of the Summit of the Americas process, including the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), that seeks to encourage
civil stability and democratic principles throughout the Americas to which Canada, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua have all actively committed.

4. Initial Environmental Assessment Findings

4.1 Expected Economic Impact

The purpose of this stage is to identify the potential trade liberalization activity resulting from the trade agreement to be negotiated. This stage will first identify what the potential agreement would entail and the overall economic relevance of the agreement to Canada. This will help to determine the scope of analysis required for the environmental assessment and to prioritize the issues to be assessed.

Three distinct areas of trade between Canada and the CA-4 countries have the potential to be affected:
merchandise trade, investment, and trade in services. These areas will each be investigated in turn.

Merchandise Trade

The majority of Canada’s business transactions with the CA-4 are in traded goods.  Close to 80% of Canada’s exports to the CA-4 consist of cereals and malt, paper and paperboard, fertilizers, fats and oils, plastic, machinery, dairy products and vegetables.

With regard to trade in goods, a way to predict where there might be a change in economic activity as a result of the free trade agreement is to examine the current tariffs between the trading partners. Most of the top import and export items currently exchanged between Canada and the CA-4 are subject to low tariffs (less than 5%)2. Recognizing that the bulk of Canada’s primary import and export items already flow between Canada and the CA-4 with low tariff interference, it is doubtful that any negotiated agreement will have a significant economic impact or alter the relative order of the top trade products (see Tables 2 – 5).  Therefore, these sectors will likely only experience a marginal increase in economic activity in Canada resulting from the proposed trade agreement.

Attention should also be directed to products, among Canada’s exports interests, that are subject to high tariffs when entering a CA-4 country. Should tariffs on such products be eliminated, an increase in exports of those products might occur, resulting in a change of domestic production. However, due to market size and economic conditions, these are likely to result in only marginal increases in Canada’s manufacturing output.

Industrial Products: Canada’s export interests for industrial products continue to be wood products and furniture, fine paper, auto parts, environmental equipment, pharmaceuticals, plastic products and certain building materials such as structural steel and prefabricated structures. As the objective of free trade negotiations is to eliminate tariffs on virtually all trade, a number of products with medium to high tariff rates may be subject to changes in economic activity. This preliminary analysis did not identify any CA-4 industrial import product that would produce a change in economic activity that might have domestic environmental implications for Canada.

The following products of export interest to Canada may be affected by changes in economic activity. These changes could have minimal domestic environmental implications for Canada:

  • Higher value-added plastic products (5 – 20% tariffs and identified export interests among Canadian firms)
  • Higher value-added paper products (15% tariff and an identified area of export interest among Canadian industrial products).
  • Structural Steel (15% tariff and an identified area of interest among Canadian industrial products).
  • Auto Parts (Certain auto parts 15 – 30% tariff and an identified area of interest among Canadian industrial products).
  • Furniture (15% tariff and an identified area of interest among Canadian industrial products).
  • Fish and Fish products (10 – 20% tariffs and an identified area of export interest)

Agricultural Products: Canada imports and exports a number of agricultural products from/to the CA-
4.  Several of the CA-4 countries have in place medium to high tariffs (10-30%) on a number of agricultural products, including vegetables, meats, poultry, alcohol and some dairy products, that may result in changes in economic activity as a result of the free trade agreement.

The following product categories were identified to have significantly high tariff rates in the CA-4 that, if lowered might lead to an increase in exports and a subsequent change in economic activity in
Canada. Nevertheless, due to the very small size of the CA-4 markets, any change is likely to be marginal.

  • Meat products
  • Poultry
  • Selected dairy products (milk, yogurt, cheese)
  • Some fruits and vegetables
  • Alcoholic beverages

Non-tariff barriers, such as non-automatic import licensing, quantitative restrictions or other duties and charges, also impede trade between countries. Unfortunately, such limitations are not easily identifiable.  The effects of a particular barrier may differ from country to country and product to product, making assessment difficult to quantify.

Trade in Services:

The three primary service sectors of export interest to Canada in Central America are professional, telecommunications and financial services. We are also hoping to expand Canada’s environmental service export opportunities to the CA-4, particularly in water and waste management. Canada’s objective in the FTA is the removal of the existing barriers to its trade in services to the CA-4 market. It is, however, unlikely that Canadian exports of services to the CA-4 countries will significantly increase in the short to medium term as a result of the FTA.

Investment:

As with services, Canada’s investment in the CA-4 is not large, with total investment amounting to only $209 million. Investment from the CA-4 into Canada is virtually nonexistent.

Canada's goals in this negotiation are to establish a clearly defined set of rules for investments and procedures for dispute resolution. These goals are designed to provide Canadian investors with a more predictable and secure environment for their investments. Based on the existing low volume of investment between Canada and the CA-4 countries, the FTA is not expected to generate a significant increase in direct investment to Canada.

Other areas:

Canada is seeking provisions on competition policy, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, technical barriers to trade, antidumping measures, institutional arrangements and dispute settlement to provide a transparent and predictable set of principles.

Since Canada will not be taking on any commitments that would require changes to its domestic policy, it is expected that provisions in the FTA in these areas will not have any economic impact on Canada. Canada is seeking enhanced market access and transparency in government procurement. While trade is likely to increase in specific product and service areas of interest to Canadian suppliers, the increased trade is expected to be limited. Since the expected economic effects of liberalized government procurement under an agreement are minimal, significant impacts, if any at all, on Canada are not likely.

4.2 Likely Environmental Impact  and Significance of Expected Economic Changes

Now that the economic effects of the trade agreement have been identified, the likely environmental impacts of such changes will be approximated and assessed as to their significance. Significance is determined by such factors as frequency, duration, scope and magnitude of the impact as well as the sectors that will be affected and the environmental significance of those sectors among other criteria.

For the purpose of strategic EAs, “environment” refers to the components of the Earth, including land, water, air, including all layers of the atmosphere, all organic and inorganic matter and living organisms and the interacting natural systems that include components of the foregoing. Please note that this section is intended to highlight only the anticipated additional environmental impacts to Canada as a result of the Canada-CA4 free trade agreement.

As mentioned in the previous section, Canada’s total trade flow with the CA-4 countries (both exports and imports) amount to 0.07% of total Canadian trade. Even if trade flows were to increase substantially, in relative terms, the absolute economic impacts would be small and thus any environmental impact would be minimal in an overall context.

Merchandise trade:

Higher value-added paper products: The relative economic impact on Canada’s forest sector is anticipated to be minimal and any environmental impact is further minimized through Canada’s forest management practices that are based not on product demand, but on provincial and territorial regulations that ensure sustainable forest management practices. For example, the allowable annual cut is based on an assessment of how much can be harvested on a sustainable basis. Harvest limits will not be increased to accommodate additional exports resulting from further trade liberalization.

Structural Steel and Furniture: The manufacturing of steel has environmental consequences through the burning of coal and the use of heavy metals throughout the smelting process.  Therefore, if there were to be a significant increase in the export of steel products, there would likely be an increase in production resulting in greater environmental costs.

The steel industry has also responded to environmental concerns and is now more proactive in addressing the environmental problems associated with its production processes.  It is not likely that the magnitude of increased exports (if any) of Canadian steel to the CA-4 would be large enough to result in significant environmental impacts. The volume and type of actual products that make up our current exports, and are likely to make up increases in exports, are such that environmental impact is considered unlikely. The market is for fabricated steel products (filing cabinets, desks, etc.) and these are likely to result in fabrication increases but not in increased smelting operations as the volumes are very low compared to total smelting output.

Auto Parts and Plastics: Due to the wide range of products within both of these industry categorizations, the environmental implications associated with the manufacturing of various products will differ. Virtually all of Canadian production of cars/vehicles and parts is for the North American market. A reduction of tariffs under the Canada-CA4 FTA is unlikely to stimulate substantial new vehicle assembly in Canada for export markets in Central America. Primarily, Mexican, Brazilian and Asian manufacturers supply these markets. Canada’s export market is geared towards part and equipment and any increase in exports to the CA4 will be so small as to have a marginal impact on the environment.

For higher value-added plastic products, environmental implications would also be marginal as volumes are such that no additional production facilities would be built specifically for these markets.

No significant environmental implications, either positive or negative, can be identified as directly arising from the potential increase in the merchandise free trade relationship that could be generated by the Canada -CA-4 FTA.  Therefore, no assessment of the significance of potential environmental impacts is considered necessary.

Trade in Services:

The expected economic change within Canada with respect to trade in services is not significant and therefore, no environmental impact can be expected. Any potential growth in services exports will take place in the medium to long term.

Any environmental impacts in Canada from an increased presence in the CA-4 countries’ services market are highly unlikely. No assessment of potential impacts is considered necessary.

Investment:

No significant increase in investment flows from the CA-4 countries into Canada can be expected to result from these negotiations. Any potential increase would be small and would have no impact on any Canadian industries where the increase could take place. Therefore, no environmental impact would result from the investment provisions of the FTA.

It is not expected that the very low level of CA-4 FDI in Canada will increase significantly as a result of the FTA. Any potential increase in investment flows from the CA-4 countries to Canada would not significantly affect any industry in Canada. Effects on the environment resulting from increased

investment generated by the Canada-CA-4 FTA would be, at the most, marginal and no assessment of the significance of the potential environmental impacts is considered necessary.

Other areas:

Canada will not be taking on any commitments in the areas of competition policy, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, technical barriers to trade, antidumping measures, institutional arrangements and dispute settlement that would require changes to its domestic policy. It is expected that these provisions in the FTA will not have any economic or environmental impact on Canada.

Since Canada will not be taking on any procedural or regulatory commitments in the area of government procurement that are different from current federal government practice, it is expected that negotiations on government procurement with the CA-4 will not have any economic or environmental impacts.

5.  Enhancement and Mitigation Options

Previous sections of this analysis have assessed likely and significant environmental impacts on Canada of a Canada-CA-4 Free Trade Agreement. This stage of the Framework is intended to identify the policy options or actions to address negative impacts and to enhance positive impacts. However, since there are no likely and significant environmental impacts identified as an outcome of these negotiations, analysis of enhancement and mitigation options is not required.

With respect to forest management, Canada has become a global leader in forest conservation, protection and sustainable use.  With consumption of wood and paper growing, world demand should be met from countries like Canada with renewable and well-managed forests. Therefore, while it is possible that there could be an increase in the export of value-added paper products (or in any other paper or wood product) from Canada, the comparatively small volume of paper exports to CA-4 countries in relation to Canada's total exports of paper products, combined with the pulp and paper industry's improved environmental stewardship, means there will not be a significant environmental impact from the proposed trade agreement.

All companies operating on public lands are required by law to seek the views of forest users, including Aboriginal peoples, local communities, and environmental organizations in order to incorporate elements such as recreational, social, wildlife and economic values into forest management planning. All harvested areas are required by law to be promptly regenerated.

6. Conclusion

Merchandise trade flows with the CA4 countries accounts for less than 0.1% of Canada’s total trade. As well, trade between Canada and the four countries primarily consists of 4 to 6 primary products that are traded relatively ‘barrier’ free between countries. This report concludes that, while there may be some increase in the trade of higher value-added paper products and structural steel, significant environmental impact on Canada is not expected as these increased exports will be easily produced in existing production runs with marginal increases in inputs used and with marginal changes to the environmental impact of those existing operating production facilities.

An investment chapter is likely to facilitate Canadian investment in the CA-4 by creating certainty and reducing the risk for investors, but it is unlikely to significantly increase investment in Canada. Similarly, trade in services is currently modest and is not likely to increase in a significant manner, in absolute terms, as a result of the FTA. Therefore, it is unlikely that there will be any significant environmental impact in Canada as a result of the chapters on services or investment.

Provisions in other areas, such as competition policy, technical barriers to trade, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, antidumping measures, institutional arrangements, government procurement and dispute settlement will not likely have a direct effect of increasing trade. The negotiations are intended to facilitate trade by creating a consistent set of rules for all Parties. The inclusion of such chapters is unlikely to have a significant environmental impact on Canada.

Undertaking environmental assessments is an effective way to address potential problems and to protect the environment by improving overall policy coherence at the national level and by assisting decision-makers in understanding environmental implications of trade policy. This environmental assessment shows that there are no likely and significant environmental impacts on Canada that can be anticipated from the Canada-CA-4 free trade negotiations. This initial EA phase is carried out for all negotiations; however, as indicated in the introduction to this document, further application of the EA Framework may not be required if environmental impacts are identified as unlikely or insignificant. This circumstance is true of the findings for this report. In accordance with the EA Framework, a Final EA is not anticipated unless new information becomes available that would warrant consideration.

Statistical Appendix

Trade Balance with the Central America Four Countries

 1992199319941995199619971998199920002001
Exports to El Salvador11,146.0520,743.6318,508.5122,710.6711,416.7721,566.5633,565.0413,753.5622,633.9422,795.67
Imports from El Salvador12,536.7517,376.1040,076.5943,660.7827,764.4844,613.3433,045.4536,484.69152,603.5844,811.49
Balance-1,390.693,367.53-21,568.08-20,950.11-16,347.72-23,046.78519.59-22,731.13-129,969.64-22,015.82
 
Exports to Guatemala23,178.8746,558.1536,971.3641,812.5967,408.1582,547.54139,481.61166,915.20122,607.78119,154.42
Imports from Guatemala42,875.1346,821.7972,733.7493,382.22103,242.35133,468.42156,706.59121,937.24168,958.12147,614.09
Balance-19,696.27-263.64-35,762.38-51,569.63-35,834.20-50,920.88-17,224.9844,977.96-46,350.34-28,459.67
 
Exports to Nicaragua10,070.0011,803.519,232.079,267.8616,710.4110,932.2612,442.4011,537.6213,549.5412,228.75
Imports from Nicaragua31,986.2816,944.849,012.7410,543.029,727.649,816.1822,221.3224,443.4559,326.0843,633.25
Balance-21,916.29-5,141.33219.33-1,275.156,982.771,116.08-9,778.92-12,905.83-45,776.54-31,404.50
 
Exports to Honduras23,678.2715,990.2914,667.1120,220.1516,489.3416,581.8118,765.7819,504.8315,379.0914,969.52
Imports from Honduras22,003.3718,224.6039,522.3149,698.6251,388.1554,394.6978,688.3568,437.8865,354.41125,256.30
Balance1,674.90-2,234.31-24,855.20-29,478.48-34,898.81-37,812.88-59,922.57-48,933.05-49,975.32-110,286.78
 
Exports to CA-468,073.1995,095.5879,379.0694,011.27112,024.67131,628.16204,254.83211,711.21174,170.35169,148.37
Imports from CA-4109,401.5499,367.33161,345.39197,284.64192,122.62242,292.62290,661.71251,303.26446,242.20361,315.13
Balance-41,328.35-4,271.75-81,966.33-103,273.37-80,097.95-110,664.46-86,406.88-39,592.06-272,071.85-192,166.76

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Exports to El-Salvador
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

31161 - Animal Slaughtering and Processing

0.00

2.83

1.48

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1,424.52

2,257.41

6,145.62

32212 - Paper Mills

5,762.32

7,549.20

9,824.52

11,341.10

4,220.23

3,108.51

2,837.81

1,416.78

2,279.72

3,187.57

11114 - Wheat Farming

0.00

6,887.70

2,118.08

2,046.48

0.00

4,796.77

7,327.51

961.35

512.77

1,899.63

21239 - Other Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying

797.30

1,440.07

787.07

871.31

2,087.02

574.43

4,098.62

814.07

3,921.67

1,501.65

32213 - Paperboard Mills

240.29

19.02

1,205.12

36.65

0.00

1,847.80

2,449.87

799.91

1,086.12

1,471.81

31151 - Dairy Product (except Frozen) Manufacturing

470.97

134.68

126.11

90.10

125.11

179.70

319.67

344.48

471.45

1,238.21

32111 - Sawmills and Wood Preservation

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

36.75

330.10

300.81

492.21

634.67

32611 - Unsupported Plastic Film, Sheet and Bag
Manufacturing

16.71

53.23

121.88

840.65

975.02

1,056.21

1,166.04

1,661.48

1,008.34

564.77

11133 - Non-Citrus Fruit and Tree Nut Farming

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

89.04

15.55

530.83

32521 - Resin and Synthetic Rubber Manufacturing

260.50

193.55

431.03

363.49

24.46

381.16

282.73

116.81

181.31

379.01

32222 - Paper Bag and Coated and Treated Paper Manufacturing

0.00

45.20

52.20

46.59

7.43

241.06

58.63

125.31

137.95

366.96

31321 - Broad-Woven Fabric Mills

61.01

53.54

700.24

223.85

180.59

644.40

325.76

106.08

229.20

312.92

11115 - Corn Farming

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

284.51

33639 - Other Motor Vehicle Parts Manufacturing

95.15

145.00

239.22

161.19

388.94

267.74

288.23

463.95

190.69

269.92

33451 - Navigational, Measuring, Medical and Control Instruments Manufacturing

609.90

263.93

29.12

3.55

0.00

29.40

0.00

48.28

1,196.67

235.09

31141 - Frozen Food Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

24.36

132.55

573.11

1,277.95

1,701.70

1,761.02

404.90

207.92

31323 - Nonwoven Fabric Mills

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

202.93

33721 - Office Furniture (including Fixtures) Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

22.46

169.84

10.01

178.36

103.91

346.63

197.57

33421 - Telephone Apparatus Manufacturing

37.76

119.60

53.29

11.41

218.50

101.98

1,267.17

384.33

917.09

194.33

33995 - Sign Manufacturing

1.26

0.00

1.75

80.78

5.04

1.19

0.00

0.96

209.99

159.04

32211 - Pulp Mills

891.01

182.15

293.09

483.11

94.40

159.70

124.80

0.00

0.00

131.37

33331 - Commercial and Service Industry Machinery Manufacturing

0.00

8.07

6.07

0.00

155.70

311.02

181.84

45.52

164.92

128.57

31122 - Starch and Vegetable Fat and Oil Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

125.88

33399 - All Other General-Purpose Machinery Manufacturing

7.93

0.87

195.48

214.04

16.89

0.00

1,043.01

15.00

29.30

118.26

32541 - Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing

342.32

403.97

110.94

56.80

69.33

49.80

20.35

348.73

349.15

113.84

SUB-TOTAL

9,594.43

17,502.60

16,321.02

17,026.10

9,311.59

15,075.56

24,002.20

11,332.35

16,403.02

20,602.89

OTHERS

1,551.62

3,241.03

2,187.49

5,684.57

2,105.17

6,491.00

9,562.84

2,421.21

6,230.92

2,192.79

TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)

11,146.05

20,743.63

18,508.51

22,710.67

11,416.77

21,566.56

33,565.04

13,753.56

22,633.94

22,795.67

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Exports to Nicaragua
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 1992199319941995199619971998199920002001
32611 - Unsupported Plastic Film, Sheet and Bag Manufacturing11.260.000.3341.171,109.10975.151,205.642,778.342,252.643,232.28
31161 - Animal Slaughtering and Processing323.740.000.0018.960.000.002.80728.401,518.351,912.48
31151 - Dairy Product (except Frozen) Manufacturing1,481.810.00363.204.06358.360.00123.85176.160.001,533.29
11113 - Dry Pea and Bean Farming306.74376.47544.960.000.00103.6852.31607.43256.591,390.46
32212 - Paper Mills670.651,072.491,202.371,005.911,172.711,231.531,377.002,525.823,865.36941.81
11114 - Wheat Farming0.000.000.000.000.000.001,165.200.00620.48872.85
32521 - Resin and Synthetic Rubber Manufacturing1,230.75813.901,354.841,566.362,011.711,088.53142.090.000.00230.61
21232 - Sand, Gravel, Clay, and Ceramic and Refractory Minerals Mining and Quarrying0.000.000.0019.8061.8178.06116.70162.19245.56222.11
32419 - Other Petroleum and Coal Products Manufacturing0.000.000.0020.410.000.0047.51247.83294.36162.86
33221 - Cutlery and Hand Tool Manufacturing0.0023.1128.0962.3684.8198.22175.43236.25220.08150.71
32532 - Pesticide and Other Agricultural Chemical Manufacturing0.0065.12181.55316.3520.210.000.00115.13151.17143.47
11121 - Vegetable and Melon Farming0.008.420.0047.5240.6591.0892.16256.54142.63136.30
32311 - Printing0.0015.190.00401.354.530.0091.08431.140.14135.01
32599 - All Other Chemical Product Manufacturing0.0026.250.0054.9424.300.000.000.000.0090.69
33422 - Radio and Television Broadcasting and Wireless Communications Equipment Manufacturing6.66241.817.383.6918.610.000.004.25145.5185.01
33421 - Telephone Apparatus Manufacturing1.481.260.000.0035.24147.5078.1478.4454.3581.36
32591 - Printing Ink Manufacturing0.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.000.0072.93
N/A0.000.003.0718.8828.640.000.0067.0743.3970.45
32411 - Petroleum Refineries0.006,664.430.008.750.000.0020.36106.21126.1569.80
33451 - Navigational, Measuring, Medical and Control Instruments Manufacturing18.880.006.6416.1242.30482.500.00117.990.0040.95
31111 - Animal Food Manufacturing27.090.0028.03542.150.00653.00550.15520.1828.7540.59
31134 - Non-Chocolate Confectionery Manufacturing0.931.402.870.740.000.000.000.0093.0539.03
31121 - Flour Milling and Malt Manufacturing908.01285.37536.7931.38913.64380.92670.96172.6754.9030.58
33312 - Construction Machinery Manufacturing0.000.004.00541.52409.601,516.69440.7890.340.0029.00
32619 - Other Plastic Product Manufacturing36.5115.048.68208.3417.3415.7524.580.0051.6728.37
SUB-TOTAL5,024.509,610.244,272.814,930.796,353.546,862.596,376.729,422.3610,165.1411,742.96
OTHERS5,045.502,193.274,959.264,337.0810,356.874,069.676,065.682,115.263,384.40485.79
TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)10,070.0011,803.519,232.079,267.8616,710.4110,932.2612,442.4011,537.6213,549.5412,228.75

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Exports to Guatemala
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 1992199319941995199619971998199920002001
11114 - Wheat Farming6,167.760.004,472.894,761.3728,364.7639,992.1479,015.8277,465.7260,792.7866,363.07
21239 - Other Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying605.743,457.073,219.982,093.024,316.445,274.758,118.2210,152.288,828.5810,480.55
32212 - Paper Mills7,086.1210,354.469,938.4116,174.939,068.6611,194.9114,576.178,943.099,302.407,148.51
11113 - Dry Pea and Bean Farming0.0079.02208.950.0033.35114.87147.83154.69543.503,468.33
31161 - Animal Slaughtering and Processing0.00132.8435.650.0041.000.000.002,955.40634.953,228.41
31121 - Flour Milling and Malt Manufacturing0.000.001,007.401.12605.34777.783,553.073,822.264,283.733,115.32
32213 - Paperboard Mills87.980.00838.36383.90160.40977.041,998.701,095.801,855.342,888.47
32521 - Resin and Synthetic Rubber Manufacturing1,105.252,612.561,818.861,206.041,447.452,469.511,154.972,878.792,167.992,248.38
33422 - Radio and Television Broadcasting and Wireless Communications Equipment Manufacturing15.20370.4715.661,472.2210.7141.302,155.12312.171,137.522,144.43
33421 - Telephone Apparatus Manufacturing245.9215,439.68547.641,529.501,182.021,534.624,585.5029,223.6111,932.361,841.26
31111 - Animal Food Manufacturing20.1335.4338.57407.61630.64726.94540.452,040.701,169.081,710.51
31141 - Frozen Food Manufacturing0.00658.051,604.092,127.103,166.723,829.304,526.755,633.661,583.841,518.46
31151 - Dairy Product (except Frozen) Manufacturing1,246.18472.73204.76567.96365.60479.90269.91108.7995.64948.66
32532 - Pesticide and Other Agricultural Chemical Manufacturing24.6211.670.000.000.000.00380.861,132.8381.05930.51
32599 - All Other Chemical Product Manufacturing1.004.1987.870.8310.4011.98617.82101.25170.54893.04
33721 - Office Furniture (including Fixtures) Manufacturing24.6945.09166.29313.32310.55687.611,105.792,847.231,779.56818.63
33331 - Commercial and Service Industry Machinery Manufacturing26.42125.1595.9582.89810.9179.13333.05401.9220.41632.99
32619 - Other Plastic Product Manufacturing52.668.10116.13295.42207.04210.73118.93121.9922.73567.60
33712 - Household and Institutional Furniture Manufacturing38.8324.9414.9534.7960.6055.47102.35247.05165.68562.54
32612 - Plastic Pipe, Pipe Fitting and Unsupported Profile Shape Manufacturing0.000.0055.93192.20173.12182.86126.76362.29348.02462.32
33599 - All Other Electrical Equipment and Component Manufacturing0.0016.501.272.24176.86500.68189.00328.48110.29414.00
11112 - Oilseed (except Soybean) Farming0.0028.3852.3772.0786.80163.99103.19165.31419.88369.62
32311 - Printing0.005.871,764.35163.741,199.61441.0183.333,757.24388.10361.32
33272 - Turned Product and Screw, Nut and Bolt Manufacturing275.72346.01260.67419.13199.37160.96462.09142.20291.67320.37
33441 - Semiconductor and Other Electronic Component Manufacturing29.221,694.7955.4174.19129.56166.37475.993,234.101,276.18299.47
SUB-TOTAL17,053.4335,923.0126,622.4132,375.5952,757.8870,073.83124,741.67157,628.83109,401.77113,736.76
OTHERS6,125.4310,635.1410,348.959,437.0014,650.2712,473.7114,739.949,286.3713,206.015,417.66
TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)23,178.8746,558.1536,971.3641,812.5967,408.1582,547.54139,481.61166,915.20122,607.78119,154.42

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Exports to Honduras
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

32212 - Paper Mills

2,243.77

4,506.78

5,532.04

6,413.33

4,668.12

5,316.44

6,335.49

7,988.77

3,020.67

2,684.21

33322 - Rubber and Plastics Industry Machinery
Manufacturing

6.02

0.00

123.07

0.00

0.00

211.92

0.00

0.00

0.00

1,793.63

21239 - Other Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying

907.20

104.69

0.00

908.00

2,218.98

2,419.03

0.00

22.42

2,117.05

1,696.27

31161 - Animal Slaughtering and Processing

0.00

0.00

51.22

0.00

0.00

92.16

214.99

860.72

1,386.98

1,235.79

32213 - Paperboard Mills

0.00

131.41

353.44

253.62

115.25

941.72

1,380.85

530.59

484.19

1,056.44

31151 - Dairy Product (except Frozen) Manufacturing

0.00

36.00

0.00

629.92

365.80

45.79

781.41

371.92

52.47

692.11

31141 - Frozen Food Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

101.94

307.22

655.25

880.42

1,321.06

1,274.47

486.28

669.03

33421 - Telephone Apparatus Manufacturing

13.60

59.43

104.16

159.63

102.95

75.37

391.17

223.78

346.84

406.67

31142 - Fruit and Vegetable Canning, Pickling and Drying

1.89

2.28

20.39

27.63

27.21

4.45

15.50

127.04

64.83

357.51

31321 - Broad-Woven Fabric Mills

192.75

73.34

283.96

393.17

109.62

183.31

720.64

241.20

151.06

296.28

33992 - Sporting and Athletic Goods Manufacturing

0.00

13.35

10.00

5.02

13.09

3.78

3.89

196.29

82.24

282.29

31324 - Knit Fabric Mills

32.30

0.00

30.23

0.00

36.23

9.16

324.96

0.00

0.00

269.66

11121 - Vegetable and Melon Farming

0.00

10.00

0.00

4.28

10.79

0.00

33.31

151.46

67.64

262.45

33391 - Pump and Compressor Manufacturing

3.82

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

22.66

35.96

99.12

166.45

249.11

33211 - Forging and Stamping

5.36

0.00

0.00

1.69

0.00

17.16

992.00

488.03

374.29

175.92

32519 - Other Basic Organic Chemical Manufacturing

75.87

136.64

56.51

196.69

68.68

147.30

115.09

105.73

66.80

171.60

11133 - Non-Citrus Fruit and Tree Nut Farming

0.00

0.00

0.00

17.10

18.80

0.00

56.24

204.84

314.48

170.64

32621 - Tire Manufacturing

0.00

85.43

76.98

0.00

0.00

0.00

51.09

447.84

82.34

130.95

11113 - Dry Pea and Bean Farming

173.80

0.00

245.41

0.00

143.17

16.85

46.23

250.24

112.37

126.63

33999 - All Other Miscellaneous Manufacturing

43.04

32.90

33.83

33.43

31.35

17.88

105.96

2.47

11.61

113.95

33329 - Other Industrial Machinery Manufacturing

8.06

212.85

266.85

262.47

26.92

20.49

375.81

270.15

35.68

110.38

32712 - Clay Building Material and Refractory Manufacturing

0.00

71.10

33.15

137.60

0.00

0.00

0.00

75.81

234.95

104.51

33272 - Turned Product and Screw, Nut and Bolt
Manufacturing

49.66

54.53

17.78

40.04

0.00

58.19

77.94

24.59

22.64

96.90

33251 - Hardware Manufacturing

9.43

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

21.94

14.67

0.00

85.80

32541 - Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing

117.43

297.85

67.06

282.00

75.50

241.53

141.82

89.07

43.25

79.50

SUB-TOTAL

3,883.97

5,828.57

7,408.01

10,072.82

8,687.71

10,725.59

13,543.34

14,061.21

9,725.10

13,318.22

OTHERS

19,794.30

10,161.73

7,259.10

10,147.33

7,801.63

5,856.22

5,222.44

5,443.62

5,653.99

1,651.31

TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)

23,678.27

15,990.29

14,667.11

20,220.15

16,489.34

16,581.81

18,765.78

19,504.83

15,379.09

14,969.52

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Imports from El Salvador
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

11133 - Non-Citrus Fruit and Tree Nut Farming

2,243.77

4,506.78

5,532.04

6,413.33

4,668.12

5,316.44

6,335.49

7,988.77

3,020.67

2,684.21

31522 - Men's and Boys' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

6.02

0.00

123.07

0.00

0.00

211.92

0.00

0.00

0.00

1,793.63

31523 - Women's and Girls' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

907.20

104.69

0.00

908.00

2,218.98

2,419.03

0.00

22.42

2,117.05

1,696.27

31519 - Other Clothing Knitting Mills

0.00

0.00

51.22

0.00

0.00

92.16

214.99

860.72

1,386.98

1,235.79

33441 - Semiconductor and Other Electronic Component Manufacturing

0.00

131.41

353.44

253.62

115.25

941.72

1,380.85

530.59

484.19

1,056.44

33992 - Sporting and Athletic Goods Manufacturing

0.00

36.00

0.00

629.92

365.80

45.79

781.41

371.92

52.47

692.11

31412 - Curtain and Linen Mills

0.00

0.00

101.94

307.22

655.25

880.42

1,321.06

1,274.47

486.28

669.03

31529 - Other Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

13.60

59.43

104.16

159.63

102.95

75.37

391.17

223.78

346.84

406.67

33599 - All Other Electrical Equipment and Component Manufacturing

1.89

2.28

20.39

27.63

27.21

4.45

15.50

127.04

64.83

357.51

31192 - Coffee and Tea Manufacturing

192.75

73.34

283.96

393.17

109.62

183.31

720.64

241.20

151.06

296.28

11121 - Vegetable and Melon Farming

0.00

13.35

10.00

5.02

13.09

3.78

3.89

196.29

82.24

282.29

11112 - Oilseed (except Soybean) Farming

32.30

0.00

30.23

0.00

36.23

9.16

324.96

0.00

0.00

269.66

31141 - Frozen Food Manufacturing

0.00

10.00

0.00

4.28

10.79

0.00

33.31

151.46

67.64

262.45

32222 - Paper Bag and Coated and Treated Paper Manufacturing

3.82

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

22.66

35.96

99.12

166.45

249.11

31699 - Other Leather and Allied Product Manufacturing

5.36

0.00

0.00

1.69

0.00

17.16

992.00

488.03

374.29

175.92

11299 - All Other Animal Production

75.87

136.64

56.51

196.69

68.68

147.30

115.09

105.73

66.80

171.60

32541 - Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

17.10

18.80

0.00

56.24

204.84

314.48

170.64

31621 - Footwear Manufacturing

0.00

85.43

76.98

0.00

0.00

0.00

51.09

447.84

82.34

130.95

31171 - Seafood Product Preparation and Packaging

173.80

0.00

245.41

0.00

143.17

16.85

46.23

250.24

112.37

126.63

33221 - Cutlery and Hand Tool Manufacturing

43.04

32.90

33.83

33.43

31.35

17.88

105.96

2.47

11.61

113.95

31321 - Broad-Woven Fabric Mills

8.06

212.85

266.85

262.47

26.92

20.49

375.81

270.15

35.68

110.38

11142 - Nursery and Floriculture Production

0.00

71.10

33.15

137.60

0.00

0.00

0.00

75.81

234.95

104.51

32199 - All Other Wood Product Manufacturing

49.66

54.53

17.78

40.04

0.00

58.19

77.94

24.59

22.64

96.90

31181 - Bread and Bakery Product Manufacturing

9.43

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

21.94

14.67

0.00

85.80

32619 - Other Plastic Product Manufacturing

117.43

297.85

67.06

282.00

75.50

241.53

141.82

89.07

43.25

79.50

SUB-TOTAL

3,883.97

5,828.57

7,408.01

10,072.82

8,687.71

10,725.59

13,543.34

14,061.21

9,725.10

13,318.22

OTHERS

19,794.30

10,161.73

7,259.10

10,147.33

7,801.63

5,856.22

5,222.44

5,443.62

5,653.99

1,651.31

TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)

23,678.27

15,990.29

14,667.11

20,220.15

16,489.34

16,581.81

18,765.78

19,504.83

15,379.09

14,969.52

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Imports from Nicaragua
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

21222 - Gold and Silver Ore Mining

16,110.90

14,838.64

7,571.87

7,924.78

2,401.79

0.00

0.00

0.00

31,530.92

28,038.94

11511 - Support Activities for Crop Production

0.00

0.00

0.00

343.59

706.03

796.19

1,007.59

19.98

1,988.64

5,144.47

11133 - Non-Citrus Fruit and Tree Nut Farming

69.55

399.28

899.60

398.67

1,224.67

3,724.55

12,146.29

14,467.30

9,998.82

3,940.83

31522 - Men's and Boys' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

235.92

1,560.80

2,205.24

4,739.63

5,212.53

4,072.03

2,963.77

31171 - Seafood Product Preparation and Packaging

467.68

1,017.74

237.57

518.55

1,756.92

348.95

825.57

1,192.63

1,469.31

1,243.72

31523 - Women's and Girls' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

427.15

872.76

1,406.02

1,605.13

1,585.41

2,590.42

1,214.09

31192 - Coffee and Tea Manufacturing

4.68

0.00

63.17

65.69

148.00

103.11

942.15

552.12

72.23

526.94

32111 - Sawmills and Wood Preservation

0.00

0.00

0.00

5.82

0.00

26.89

0.00

54.63

0.00

110.53

31222 - Tobacco Product Manufacturing

0.00

0.38

0.47

18.34

115.21

283.52

152.92

460.67

95.26

93.17

32711 - Pottery, Ceramics and Plumbing Fixture Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

2.36

1.44

0.00

9.27

8.74

416.05

1,576.22

89.79

31529 - Other Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.01

27.29

1.58

0.38

75.32

32541 - Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing

0.00

104.58

124.79

109.79

246.38

76.94

128.38

70.49

0.00

58.60

11121 - Vegetable and Melon Farming

0.00

0.00

29.62

105.98

98.84

321.29

114.55

234.28

6.00

41.11

11199 - All Other Crop Farming

0.00

0.00

10.20

155.20

141.59

185.60

0.93

5.43

2.42

22.37

33712 - Household and Institutional Furniture
Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

10.25

0.12

0.00

1.97

0.00

4.36

29.43

20.30

31499 - All Other Textile Product Mills

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.24

5.95

19.99

10.74

33.90

12.50

31131 - Sugar Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

5,318.82

10.82

31491 - Textile Bag and Canvas Mills

0.00

0.00

0.32

0.67

0.00

0.00

1.07

0.00

0.04

4.58

33361 - Engine, Turbine and Power Transmission Equipment Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.37

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

16.98

3.92

33631 - Motor Vehicle Gasoline Engine and Engine Parts Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

1.04

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

3.29

33999 - All Other Miscellaneous Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.11

4.20

3.15

33411 - Computer and Peripheral Equipment
Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

9.07

0.00

1.18

2.90

33992 - Sporting and Athletic Goods Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

2.88

0.00

0.00

2.90

31519 - Other Clothing Knitting Mills

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.42

0.00

1.63

0.30

0.25

0.29

1.01

33721 - Office Furniture (including Fixtures) Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

3.96

1.00

SUB-TOTAL

16,652.80

16,360.62

8,951.61

10,312.12

9,275.25

9,497.13

21,732.48

24,288.53

58,811.46

43,630.00

OTHERS

15,333.48

584.22

61.13

230.90

452.39

319.05

488.84

154.92

514.62

3.25

TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)

31,986.28

16,944.84

9,012.74

10,543.02

9,727.64

9,816.18

22,221.32

24,443.45

59,326.08

43,633.25

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Imports from Guatemala
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

11133 - Non-Citrus Fruit and Tree Nut Farming

25,587.16

27,087.05

44,930.75

63,858.91

51,075.29

68,873.39

70,403.08

61,385.51

69,999.99

61,335.45

31131 - Sugar Manufacturing

838.04

0.00

10.42

0.00

21,261.28

33,163.79

51,714.66

24,103.37

61,624.67

38,283.02

11121 - Vegetable and Melon Farming

3,909.28

5,171.61

7,145.90

6,331.46

5,953.11

5,514.14

8,653.41

13,052.51

14,257.41

15,740.41

31523 - Women's and Girls' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

2,262.82

2,655.79

4,474.04

4,421.90

4,017.47

5,013.02

4,306.72

4,431.73

3,882.47

8,859.68

31529 - Other Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

54.95

1.72

22.75

25.15

64.67

131.33

79.18

1,227.69

1,334.15

4,468.19

31522 - Men's and Boys' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

3,496.69

1,094.47

2,350.97

4,380.34

4,889.39

5,540.69

7,018.26

3,413.46

3,138.13

3,862.41

33999 – All Other Miscellaneous Manufacturing

28.33

30.36

354.29

321.89

417.96

605.26

851.33

958.43

1,667.73

2,451.75

11142 - Nursery and Floriculture Production

478.42

420.41

1,306.88

1,420.02

1,223.11

1,932.40

2,574.71

2,177.91

2,025.47

2,372.60

11112 - Oilseed (except Soybean) Farming

1,980.65

2,934.12

3,345.44

5,312.80

6,996.30

4,842.69

5,138.80

4,485.94

3,156.16

1,886.01

11199 – All Other Crop Farming

257.37

288.84

686.02

711.12

562.62

625.78

699.33

999.14

952.75

1,495.87

32561 - Soap and Cleaning Compound Manufacturing

2,092.19

2,568.67

3,059.68

1,955.81

2,847.26

1,837.71

1,288.06

960.13

1,483.67

1,177.97

31519 - Other Clothing Knitting Mills

0.00

0.00

11.37

205.74

48.84

47.61

381.57

779.13

804.90

1,169.94

33911 - Medical Equipment and Supplies
Manufacturing

3.51

70.96

76.54

92.96

205.27

698.30

792.02

1,064.22

759.81

552.86

31192 - Coffee and Tea Manufacturing

46.74

1,983.06

369.55

196.94

838.31

1,930.45

608.43

199.32

392.40

535.17

32711 - Pottery, Ceramics and Plumbing Fixture Manufacturing

8.85

694.23

1,370.78

58.22

92.83

8.86

6.18

17.69

242.23

512.96

31599 - Clothing Accessories and Other Clothing Manufacturing

145.31

210.67

225.03

223.53

172.29

186.83

436.46

328.05

451.72

371.88

31141 - Frozen Food Manufacturing

397.66

501.82

702.92

434.63

286.05

311.62

361.71

121.65

527.24

334.04

31194 - Seasoning and Dressing Manufacturing

9.11

0.31

8.74

114.40

5.14

16.12

4.44

157.59

147.00

303.96

32191 - Millwork

0.00

0.00

2.96

0.00

0.00

2.03

2.60

152.51

234.00

285.88

31412 - Curtain and Linen Mills

43.31

66.10

41.24

23.15

6.74

1.73

2.73

26.26

169.67

142.05

31322 - Narrow Fabric Mills and Schiffli Machine Embroidery

3.16

118.77

56.22

207.37

29.47

0.13

0.90

30.35

190.66

136.07

32721 - Glass and Glass Product Manufacturing

1.65

0.00

3.95

70.67

37.24

32.85

76.02

36.92

155.26

108.21

33351 - Metalworking Machinery Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.02

0.00

100.00

11511 - Support Activities for Crop Production

129.22

99.12

255.72

8.05

20.94

36.37

23.25

87.85

32.01

99.27

33992 - Sporting and Athletic Goods Manufacturing

27.59

34.39

391.56

403.85

145.19

130.83

154.26

221.15

108.29

90.15

SUB-TOTAL

41,802.00

46,032.46

71,203.70

90,778.90

101,196.77

131,483.92

155,578.11

120,418.52

167,737.79

146,675.78

OTHERS

1,073.14

789.32

1,530.04

2,603.32

2,045.58

1,984.50

1,128.48

1,518.73

1,220.34

938.31

TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)

42,875.13

46,821.79

72,733.74

93,382.22

103,242.35

133,468.42

156,706.59

121,937.24

168,958.12

147,614.09

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Canadian Total Imports from Honduras
Top 25 Industries (5-digit NAICS codes)
Canadian Dollars (Thousands)

 

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

31522 - Men's and Boys' Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

345.06

1,324.64

2,851.42

4,854.95

9,942.92

12,993.07

24,288.01

26,713.60

24,216.58

31,840.23

11133 - Non-Citrus Fruit and Tree Nut Farming

8,336.88

8,567.87

22,169.77

27,187.61

20,335.91

15,523.99

23,315.05

7,941.73

11,071.49

22,611.82

21222 - Gold and Silver Ore Mining

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

8,808.06

1,644.69

16,246.58

31131 - Sugar Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

15,813.53

31523 - Women's and Girls' Cut and Sew Clothing
Manufacturing

800.69

1,079.77

1,519.09

3,526.65

4,807.07

6,016.35

7,764.88

8,311.56

7,653.41

13,761.65

11121 - Vegetable and Melon Farming

3,985.36

4,513.30

5,692.46

5,596.06

4,913.24

4,835.19

6,315.23

2,970.62

2,887.31

6,128.89

31519 - Other Clothing Knitting Mills

385.28

162.00

162.54

96.32

24.92

260.36

1,251.82

1,858.10

1,533.75

3,971.37

31529 - Other Cut and Sew Clothing Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

898.21

1,241.75

3,268.34

2,578.88

2,282.46

1,987.67

3,333.00

21223 - Copper, Nickel, Lead and Zinc Ore Mining

6,392.99

611.01

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

3,922.78

2,793.02

33639 - Other Motor Vehicle Parts Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

835.61

16.26

2,931.10

4,706.85

5,171.37

2,494.09

4,224.06

1,885.45

33992 - Sporting and Athletic Goods Manufacturing

308.88

8.40

542.97

372.37

464.22

608.89

676.26

764.22

924.52

753.23

32191 - Millwork

0.00

0.00

29.68

12.71

0.00

0.11

1.11

1.17

126.85

730.47

33712 - Household and Institutional Furniture Manufacturing

50.26

93.35

14.70

50.87

84.26

370.02

491.49

562.27

664.39

657.06

11411 - Fishing

0.00

0.00

0.70

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

157.55

471.60

614.47

31491 - Textile Bag and Canvas Mills

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

1.23

0.00

0.14

32.95

0.39

607.60

31222 - Tobacco Product Manufacturing

92.76

82.83

171.32

290.17

740.11

1,130.66

1,241.27

1,225.98

502.81

562.19

31221 - Tobacco Stemming and Redrying

208.49

223.09

147.83

65.40

266.45

790.39

479.38

160.53

58.82

453.82

31171 - Seafood Product Preparation and Packaging

682.25

907.86

564.65

1,174.27

1,862.22

2,351.68

1,824.10

926.19

588.08

406.13

33531 - Electrical Equipment Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

250.26

1,276.16

915.50

905.43

380.41

31311 - Fibre, Yarn and Thread Mills

0.00

0.00

0.00

34.23

0.00

1.80

0.00

0.00

81.22

194.72

31141 - Frozen Food Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

26.54

154.04

60.39

0.00

0.00

79.32

122.77

166.90

32519 - Other Basic Organic Chemical Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

4.60

102.76

163.38

32199 - All Other Wood Product Manufacturing

138.68

227.63

3,629.04

3,916.69

170.08

91.87

120.27

96.98

189.48

127.47

33341 - Ventilation, Heating, Air-Conditioning and Commercial
Refrigeration Equipment Manufacturing

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.04

126.48

32541 - Pharmaceutical and Medicine Manufacturing

48.40

166.20

275.56

332.88

170.91

148.28

142.28

0.74

0.09

71.04

SUB-TOTAL

21,775.97

17,967.92

38,633.85

48,579.68

48,016.76

53,348.09

76,937.68

66,308.21

63,880.99

124,400.92

OTHERS

227.41

256.68

888.46

1,118.94

3,371.39

1,046.60

1,750.67

2,129.67

1,473.42

855.39

TOTAL (ALL INDUSTRIES)

22,003.37

18,224.60

39,522.31

49,698.62

51,388.15

54,394.69

78,688.35

68,437.88

65,354.41

125,256.30

Source: Industry Canada (strategis.gc.ca) with data from Statistics Canada

Services Transactions
(million $)

 

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

El Salvador

Receipts

11

8

6

6

9

10

10

10

Travel

8

5

3

4

4

3

4

4

Commercial Services

 

 

1

1

3

4

3

4

Transportation and Government Services

2

2

1

1

2

4

3

3

Payments

1

2

4

4

3

8

5

6

Travel

1

1

3

3

2

7

4

5

Commercial Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transportation Services

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

1

Balance with El Salvador

10

6

2

2

6

2

5

4

Guatemala

Receipts

8

10

11

16

13

24

21

20

Travel

3

4

4

4

4

7

8

7

Commercial Services

2

3

3

8

6

12

9

8

Transportation Services

3

3

3

3

3

5

5

5

Payments

5

8

8

13

8

11

21

7

Travel

3

5

4

7

4

5

16

4

Commercial Services

 

1

1

3

 

2

1

1

Transportation Services

2

2

3

3

3

4

5

3

Balance with Guatemala

3

2

3

3

5

13

0

13

Nicaragua

Receipts

7

7

9

14

10

9

8

11

Travel

2

2

3

3

3

3

4

4

Commercial Services

1

1

3

7

3

2

2

6

Transportation Services

3

4

4

3

4

3

2

2

Payments

1

1

8

11

8

7

3

2

Travel

 

1

6

10

7

5

1

 

Commercial Services

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

2

Transportation Services

 

 

1

1

1

1

 

 

Balance with Nicaragua

6

6

1

3

2

2

5

9

Honduras

Receipts

9

9

7

11

16

12

14

16

Travel

2

2

2

4

5

3

3

3

Commercial Services

2

3

2

5

9

7

9

11

Transportation Services

5

4

3

2

2

2

2

2

Payments

2

2

5

5

9

8

8

5

Travel

2

1

4

4

8

4

5

3

Commercial Services

 

1

 

 

1

3

1

1

Transportation Services

 

 

 

 

1

1

1

1

Balance with Honduras

7

7

2

6

7

4

6

11

Central America Four

Receipts

35

34

33

47

48

55

53

57

Travel

15

13

12

15

16

16

19

18

Commercial Services

5

7

9

21

21

25

23

29

Transportation Services

13

13

11

9

11

14

12

12

Payments

9

13

25

33

28

34

37

20

Travel

6

8

17

24

21

21

26

12

Commercial Services

0

2

1

3

1

6

3

4

Transportation Services

2

2

4

4

5

7

7

5

Balance with CA4

26

21

8

14

20

21

16

37


1 For further details on the nature of Canada’s development assistance programs throughout the CA-4 countries please visit the Canadian International Development Agency’s website at: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca/CIDAWEB/webcountry.nsf/americas_e.html
2 For the purpose of this report those tariff rates set at 5% or below are considered low, those at 10% are considered medium, while those at 15% or above are considered high.