Departmental Plan 2018-19

ISSN 2371-7688

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Table of Contents

Ministers’ Message

The Honourable Chrystia Freeland
The Honourable Chrystia Freeland
Minister of Foreign Affairs
The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau
The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau
Minister of International Development and La Francophonie
The Honourable François-Philippe Champagne
The Honourable François-Philippe Champagne
Minister of International Trade

The Government of Canada is committed to working within the rules-based international order to promote peace and prosperity in the world. Our 2018-19 Departmental Plan provides a broad overview of how we intend to do this.

One of our signature priorities for 2018 is to use our G7 presidency to advance Canada’s domestic and international priorities. This includes investing in growth that works for everyone; preparing for the jobs of the future; advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment; working together on climate change, the oceans and clean energy; and building a more peaceful and secure world.

Canada will continue its active contributions to finding peaceful and durable diplomatic solutions to crises in Venezuela, Myanmar and Ukraine, as well as on the Korean Peninsula. We will also increase our support for least-developed and fragile states. Half of the world’s poorest citizens live in sub-Saharan Africa. For that reason, we will ensure that by the 2021-22 fiscal year, no less than 50 percent of our bilateral international development assistance is directed to sub-Saharan African countries. These dynamic international engagements will also support our ongoing campaign for a seat on the United Nations Security Council for the 2021-22 term.

This year, we will work to further strengthen our relationship with our closest continental neighbour and global ally, the United States. It is vital that our partnership continues on matters of trade, energy and environment policy, border management, continental defence and international security.

We will seek to intensify and diversify Canadian trade worldwide while emphasizing respect for labour, gender, Indigenous rights and environmental protections. Our international engagements will continue to reflect our commitment to a rules-based global trading system that enjoys broad public support and whose benefits extend to all.

This year our department will also implement several new efforts launched in 2017, including Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security; the Elsie Initiative on Women in Peace Operations; the Vancouver Principles on Peacekeeping and the Prevention of the Recruitment and Use of Child Soldiers; and the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise.

Canada has adopted the Feminist International Assistance Policy, which seeks to eradicate poverty and build a more peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world. This policy recognizes that promoting gender equality and empowering women and girls is the most effective approach to achieving the 2030 Agenda.

As we seek to make advancements in these and other areas, we will also work to ensure that we are meeting the needs of Canadians, in the quality of our consular services, in the assistance they receive when travelling, working or living abroad and in the way their interests are pursued on the global stage.

In these times of growing uncertainty in the world, Canada will continue to support and seek to improve the rules-based international order, which commits countries to meeting the highest of standards. We will do this wherever and however we can, in a manner that explicitly embraces the connection between security, free and fair trade, development and human rights.

Plans at a glance

In 2018-19, Global Affairs Canada will continue to deliver results on the Government of Canada’s commitments to preserve and nurture Canadian prosperity and security, including through consular services to Canadians, and to contribute to a more just, inclusive, and sustainable world. Efforts will focus on the four following priorities:

Priority 1: Strengthening the rules-based international order

The Government of Canada is committed to playing an active role in the preservation and strengthening of an international order based on rules.

In 2018-19, Global Affairs Canada will demonstrate strategic leadership and engage constructively with multilateral, international and bilateral partners to influence others in driving positive action on global issues such as strengthening global peace operations, advancing inclusive and progressive international trade arrangements, reducing poverty, advancing gender equality, combatting climate change, and mitigating cyber threats, while targeting and mainstreaming gender equality through everything it does.

Canada holds the G7 Presidency in 2018 and will host the G7 Leaders’ Summit in the Charlevoix region in Quebec in June 2018. The G7 Leaders’ Summit brings together the leaders of the G7 and the presidents of the European Council and Commission annually to discuss pressing global issues. The department will also continue to advance Canada’s interests in key international forums and campaign for a seat on the United Nations Security Council for 2021-22.

Priority 2: Advancing Canada’s feminist foreign policy

The Government of Canada is committed to promoting gender equality, human rights, inclusion and respect for diversity and inclusive governance, both in Canada and internationally.

As part of its comprehensive feminist foreign policy, Global Affairs Canada will continue to implement its new Feminist International Assistance Policy, launched in 2017. This Policy outlines how Canada will refocus its international assistance on helping the poorest and most vulnerable people and build a more peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world. Implementation is focused on six action areas that recognize that promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls is the most effective approach to eradicating poverty and achieving the Sustainable Development goals by 2030.

Priority 3: Pursuing a progressive trade agenda

The Government of Canada is committed to pursuing a progressive trade agenda to support all segments of society in taking advantage of the economic opportunities flowing from trade and investment.

Global Affairs Canada will contribute to inclusive prosperity through increased and diversified international trade and foreign direct investment. The department will also pursue progressive approaches with trading partners in important areas such as transparency, labour rights, the environment, small and medium-sized enterprises, gender, and Indigenous peoples.

Priority 4: Maintaining constructive relations with the United States

The Government of Canada is committed to maintaining constructive relations with Canada’s key ally, partner and neighbour to the south.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to engage the U.S. federal, state and local governments, private sector and civil society organizations on key areas such as trade, security, energy and the environment.

Global Affairs Canada will collaborate with other government departments, in a whole-of-government approach to Canada-U.S. relations, to minimize trade frictions; enhance border facilitation and security; cooperate on energy infrastructure and security; advance environmental action, wherever possible; and join efforts to address global issues and continental security threats.

Innovation and experimentation

Global Affairs Canada is committed to pursuing innovative approaches to addressing complex global challenges and delivering strong value for Canadians. As a department with a history of policy and program entrepreneurship, Global Affairs Canada intends to experiment with new approaches in targeted areas and take smart risks to deliver better results on its international agenda. The department will refine and further formalize and institutionalize its commitment to experimentation in the year ahead.

For more information on Global Affairs Canada’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibilities

Core Responsibility 1: International Advocacy and Diplomacy

Description

Global Affairs Canada promotes Canada’s interests and values through policy development, diplomacy, advocacy, and effective engagement.

Planning highlights

Through effective international advocacy and diplomacy, Global Affairs Canada represents Canada to the world in support of the values that Canadians hold dear, including human rights, democratic and inclusive governance, growth that works for everyone, respect for diversity, gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, peace and security and environmental sustainability.

Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.

Global Affairs Canada will leverage its expansive global network of missions to maintain and strengthen traditional and new partnerships around the world both in multilateral and bilateral forums. Through these relationships and in collaboration with partner departments and agencies, the department will advance Canada’s values and interests, particularly gender equality, and will promote a rules-based international order.

Maintaining constructive relations with the United States remains one of the Minister of Foreign Affairs’ top priorities, as set out in her mandate letter from the Prime Minister. No relationship has a larger impact on Canada’s interests than that with its neighbour to the south. Canada will continue to work with all levels of government domestically and in the United States to uphold this unique relationship, built on shared geography, similar values, security and defence cooperation, and deep economic ties. Global Affairs Canada will carry out targeted advocacy initiatives with a focus on free trade; border facilitation and security; cooperation on energy infrastructure and security; and advancing climate change action, particularly at the sub-national level.

The department will also strengthen collaboration with long-standing partners in Europe through targeted diplomacy and advocacy initiatives that support foreign affairs, trade and security objectives, including through advancing the Canada-European Union Strategic Partnership Agreement, implementation of the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement and a number of Canada-United Kingdom initiatives. Global Affairs Canada will work with the Department of National Defence and others in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe to ensure Canada continues to contribute to Euro-Atlantic security and the maintenance of the international rules-based order. In addition, Global Affairs Canada will promote Canada’s circumpolar interests at the Arctic Council and other relevant bodies, in cooperation with territorial, provincial and northern Indigenous partners.

Arctic Policy Framework

The department will work with Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs to co-develop with territorial, provincial and Indigenous partners a new Arctic Policy Framework as announced by the ministers of Foreign Affairs and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs in November 2017.

Global Affairs Canada will advance comprehensive engagement with China, strengthen engagement with India, renew engagement with Pakistan, and reinforce Canada’s role in key Asian multilateral forums—including the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)—and Canada’s interest in joining the East Asia Summit and ASEAN Defence Ministers’ Meeting Plus. The department will continue to work with its partners in Canada and abroad to identify and address security threats from and within Asia—including in North Korea and the South China Sea—and support peace and reconciliation efforts. Global Affairs Canada will continue to work with Myanmar, Bangladesh and other partners for a resolution to the ongoing Rohingya crisis.

Global Affairs Canada will continue implementation of the whole-of-government strategy for Canada’s diplomatic, development and security/stabilization engagement in Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Lebanon, including working with the Department of National Defence to maintain Canada’s role as a leading member of the Global Coalition against Daesh. The department will also continue to employ other strategic initiatives such as reengagement with Iran to advance Canada’s political, economic and security interests in the region, while continuing to hold Iran to account for human rights violations and to implement a robust sanctions regime.

Working with partners in Latin America and the Caribbean, Global Affairs Canada will champion rights and inclusive governance, advance democracy and human rights, and challenge corruption and impunity. The department will promote prosperity, resilience and sustainable growth that works for everyone. In addition, Canada will support reconstruction and longer-term climate resilience in the Caribbean. Global Affairs Canada will also support efforts to bring about a negotiated peaceful solution to the political, economic and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, including by working with the Lima Group and other international partners to exert pressure on the Venezuelan government to restore democracy and protect human rights. Canada will seek to strengthen the hemisphere’s multilateral system, including through participation in the 2018 Summit of the Americas in Peru and through ongoing engagement with the Organization of American States, the Central American Integration System, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), the Pacific AllianceFootnote 1, MercosurFootnote 2, and the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States.

In Africa, Canada will pursue its political, development, security, and economic interests, by promoting human rights and regional stability and security through bilateral and multilateral engagement, including with the African Union Commission and African Union Partners’ Group, Regional Economic Communities, La Francophonie, the Commonwealth, Sahel envoys, the United Nations (UN), and multilateral banks. Canada will continue to leverage engagement in these areas as key factors/enabling conditions in reducing poverty, establishing political stability, and advancing democracy, ensuring that each nation achieves its economic potential on the continent, which includes fragile and conflict-affected states.

Canada's leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.

Canada will continue to apply its feminist foreign policy, ensuring that gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls are integrated and targeted across all of Global Affairs Canada’s policy positions. Canada will continue to promote inclusion and respect for diversity through bilateral and multilateral engagements, including at the UN, the United Nations Human Rights Council, the International Contact Group on Freedom of Religion or Belief, and various regional groupings. Canada will also remain a champion for human rights, and through targeted advocacy and outreach, Global Affairs Canada will address human rights abuses and violations internationally, including through sanctions regulations, with particular emphasis on women and girls, persons with disabilities, Indigenous peoples and LGBTI persons, as well as members of faith and belief communities. Canada will continue to support international efforts to protect civilians in zones of armed conflict, including through implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 2286 (2016), Strongly Condemning Attacks against Medical Facilities, Personnel in Conflict Situations.

Canada will continue to advance its international peace and security interests related to stabilization, as well as countering terrorism, crime and radicalization to violence through multilateral frameworks and leadership in international institutions, including: active participation in the Global Coalition against Daesh; co-chairing the Working Group on Capacity-Building in the West Africa Region, in support of the Global Counterterrorism Forum; shaping the negotiations for a follow-up mechanism to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its three Protocols; working with like-minded nations to shape negotiations for an additional Protocol to the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime (Budapest Convention); and working multilaterally and bilaterally with partners to further shared agendas on counterterrorism, transnational crime and combatting cyber threats.

The department will also continue to deliver on the government’s commitment to make Canada a leader in international efforts to combat climate change, as set out in the Prime Minister’s mandate letter to the Minister of Foreign Affairs. For example, Canada will continue to push for ambitious global climate change action as the host of the 2018 G7 Summit and has identified climate change, oceans and clean energy as one of five key themes for its presidency.

Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.

Canada is committed to strengthening multilateralism and the rules-based international order. It will pursue constructive leadership and engagement to support organizational innovation and reforms to improve accountability, transparency, effectiveness and results in international institutions. This includes the UN system broadly, its peace and security architecture and peacekeeping missions specifically, as well as international financial institutions, the Commonwealth, and La Francophonie. Through both multilateral and bilateral channels, Canada will continue to insist on universal respect for, and compliance with, international humanitarian and human rights law. Canada will also contribute to the prevention of and effective response to global crises—including by strengthening global conflict management and peacebuilding capabilities—and the effectiveness of international and Canadian sanctions regimes.

UN reform

Canada will continue to promote the UN Secretary-General’s ambitious UN reform agenda aimed at building a more integrated approach to development, peace and security.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to provide strategic legal advice to the Government of Canada, supported by research and analysis to enable Canada’s compliance with international law. The department will also push for international legal instruments to reflect Canadian positions, with a focus on cybercrime, biodiversity, oceans and the environment. Global Affairs Canada will prepare Canada’s submission on the outer limits of its continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean, which would protect its sovereign rights over the shelf’s natural resources and jurisdiction over other activities such as marine scientific research.

Global Affairs Canada will also promote the use of merit-based appointments and elections to international organizations and more representation by qualified women, including advocating for qualified Canadian candidates in leadership positions, in accordance with the Minister of Foreign Affairs’ mandate letter.

Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.

Canada will demonstrate its leadership on global issues through its G7 Presidency in 2018, which includes welcoming global leaders to the June G7 Summit in the Charlevoix region in Quebec. Throughout its G7 Presidency, Canada will advance both its domestic and international priorities, framed by five key themes: investing in growth that works for everyone; preparing for jobs of the future; advancing gender equality and women’s empowerment supported through the establishment of a Gender Equality Advisory Council for Canada’s G7 Presidency; working together on climate change, oceans and clean energy; and building a more peaceful and secure world. Canada will also host a number of ministerial, Sherpa, senior officials and working group meetings, all in support of the priority themes that have been selected by Canada to advance during the G7 Presidency.

In order to further strengthen Canada’s voice on global issues and allow it to better contribute to decision-making processes at the UN, Canada is pursuing a seat on the UN Security Council for 2021-22.

Table 1: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2014-15 Actual results2015-16 Actual results2016-17 Actual results
Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.Percentage of advocacy campaigns which met their stated objectives.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of diplomatic activities which met their stated objectives.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of international commitments through which Canada works with partners to address strategic peace and security challenges.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canada’s leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.Number of influencers reached through Canadian-hosted events, including events on women’s empowerment and rights and gender equality.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of Canadian-led decisions introduced through international and regional organizations that are accepted.100%March 31, 2019100%100%100%
Number of Canadians in leadership positions in international institutions.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.Percentage of organizations of which Canada is a member, which receive a positive performance rating on any independent evaluation.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Degree to which Canadian positions on international legal issues are reflected in the outcome of discussions and negotiations, such as agreements, arrangements and resolutions.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Degree to which actions that are led or supported by Canada support strengthened adherence to international law.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.Ranking of Canada’s global presence as reflected by our participation in the global economy, our military presence and our people-to-people ties.5thMarch 31, 20198th9th8th
Ranking of Canada’s reputation abroad as reported in global opinion polls.1stMarch 31, 20191st2nd1st
Percentage of Canadians who are satisfied with Canada’s international engagement.Obtain Baseline InformationFootnote 3Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Table 2: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19 Main Estimates2018-19 Planned spending2019-20 Planned spending2020-21 Planned spending
951,392,177951,392,177876,662,005877,091,447
Table 3: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19 Planned full-time equivalents2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents2020-21 Planned full-time equivalents
2,4422,2552,254

Core Responsibility 2: Trade and Investment

Description

Global Affairs Canada supports increased and more diverse trade and investment to raise the standard of living for all Canadians and to enable Canadian businesses to grow internationally and to create economic opportunities.

Planning highlights

Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.

Canada is a global leader in championing the rules-based international trading system and its institutions. To ensure Canada’s economic interests in relation to the global trading system are advanced, the department will continue to engage actively with key partners in various forums, including the G7, the G20, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and the World Trade Organization.

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) supports millions of jobs in Canada, the United States and Mexico. The renegotiation of NAFTA offers an opportunity to modernize and improve the agreement. Canada will strengthen trilateral cooperation with the United States and Mexico and effectively manage the renegotiation to ensure Canada’s interests are well protected. This is one of the top priorities outlined in the Prime Minister’s mandate letter to the Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Gender-related barriers to trade

As part of Canada’s progressive trade agenda, Canada is working to better understand the gender-related effects of trade and seeking, through its trade agreements, to reduce barriers to the participation of women in international trade.

Global Affairs Canada will conduct activities toward the signature and ratification of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership and the modernization of the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement. The department will continue efforts to advance the implementation and promotion of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement and the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement, as well as position Canada to best address the implications and opportunities presented by Brexit.

In addition to strengthening trade and investment with traditional partners, Canada will continue to expand and diversify trade and investment with emerging markets and new partners. The department will continue free trade agreement negotiations with the Pacific AllianceFootnote 4 and MercosurFootnote 5 and exploratory discussions with China and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

The department will also continue to advance Canada’s progressive trade agenda. Global Affairs Canada will work to ensure that the benefits and opportunities that flow from an open and inclusive rules-based trading system are widely shared. This includes ensuring that negotiations are informed by ongoing dialogue with a broad range of Canadians, including those who have traditionally been underrepresented, such as women, youth, and Indigenous peoples, among others. It also seeks to ensure that more Canadians benefit from increased trade and investment by including progressive elements in trade agreements. This includes new or enhanced provisions in important areas such as transparency, labour rights, the environment, small and medium-sized enterprises, gender, and Indigenous peoples.

Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.

Global Affairs Canada supports Canadian exporters and innovators internationally. The department’s Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) helps to position its clients to pursue global opportunities, including those arising from trade agreements, with a special focus on small and medium-sized enterprises owned by women, youth, and Indigenous peoples, among others. This emphasis includes supporting women-led trade missions. Over 15,000 exporters use the TCS services and know-how on an annual basis.

Trade Commissioner Service transformation

The TCS transformation is a strategic review of the Trade Commissioner Service that seeks to enhance services to clients with a particular focus on high-growth firms, as well as improving the way TCS works with partners such as Export Development Canada and provincial trade agencies, in delivering seamless services to Canadian companies conducting international business.

The Global Markets Support Program, a harmonized contribution program with an annual budget of $18 million (CanExport, Global Opportunities for Associations, Going Global Innovation, and Invest Canada – Community Initiatives) will continue to support the international business development activities of Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises and Canadian innovators, and help communities attract, retain and expand foreign direct investment.

The department will continue to promote Canadian firms as world leaders in clean technologies through the new International Business Development Strategy for Clean Technology. Global Affairs Canada collaborates with provincial and territorial governments, Sustainable Development Technology CanadaFootnote i and the whole-of-government Clean Growth HubFootnote ii to support the Canadian clean technology industry, which is comprised predominantly of small and medium-sized enterprises, with an emphasis on scaling-up these cutting-edge firms in preparation for the global market and positioning Canadian companies to capitalize on clean growth opportunities. The department will also support Export Development Canada in offering project financing to assist clean technology businesses for international growth.

The TCS will work in collaboration with the Department of Canadian Heritage to deliver a new export strategy in support of the internationalization of Canada’s creative industries, including the audiovisual, music, book, art and digital media sectors. The TCS will also promote e-commerce as a channel for Canadians firms to reach new customers, as part of an integrated international business growth strategy and develop partnerships to ensure that Canadian companies are prepared for the evolving digital landscape in mainstream commercial transactions.

Progressive trade succeeds when it works for everyone. Building on Canada’s existing expertise and leadership in corporate social responsibility, Global Affairs Canada will strengthen its capacity through the creation of an independent Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise, mandated to investigate allegations of human rights abuses linked to Canadian corporate activity abroad. It will also create a multi-stakeholder Advisory Board to advise the government and the Ombudsperson on responsible business conduct abroad. The department’s promotion of corporate social responsibility contributes to the long-term success of Canadian companies active abroad and to broad-based economic and social benefits to lower-income countries.

Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.

Making Canada a top destination for global investment remains a core priority of the government. Global Affairs Canada will continue to maximize international opportunities for Canadians with a progressive trade and investment strategy aligned to the Prime Minister’s mandate letter commitment to the Minister of International Trade. In support of this strategy, the government committed $218 million over five years in 2017 and has launched Invest in Canada to make investing in Canada simpler and more attractive. The department’s TCS will work seamlessly with Invest in Canada to attract foreign direct investments and reinforce a positive profile of Canada’s openness to international commerce.

Table 4: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2014-15 Actual results2015-16 Actual results2016-17 Actual results
Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.Degree to which Canada opens markets and advances trade policy innovations through negotiations, agreements and discussions.4
(on a 1-5 scale)
March 31, 2019Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Degree to which Canada works to resolve or mitigate market access barriers, disputes or other strategic policy issues.4
(on a 1-5 scale)
March 31, 2019Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of applications for permits and certificates related to trade controls processed in accordance with service standards.90%Footnote 6March 31, 201994%97%97.5%
Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.Percentage of clients indicating satisfaction with the quality of services delivered by the Trade Commissioner Service.85%Footnote 7March 31, 201984.6%85%89.5%
Number of active business clients of the Trade Commissioner Service.16,000March 31, 201914,15714,46514,509
Number of concluded commercial agreements facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.1,000March 31, 20199349631,008
Number of international research and innovation partnerships facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.150Footnote 8March 31, 2019218203260
Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.Number of new foreign investments and expansions of existing foreign investments in Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.110March 31, 2019106109101
Number of investor visits to Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.100Footnote 9March 31, 2019150170153
Table 5: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19 Main Estimates2018-19 Planned spending2019-20 Planned spending2020-21 Planned spending
267,710,639267,710,639268,738,926256,861,895
Table 6: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19 Planned full-time equivalents2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents2020-21 Planned full-time equivalents
1,8671,8701,840

Core Responsibility 3: Development, Peace and Security Programming

Description

Global Affairs Canada programming contributes to reducing poverty, increasing opportunity for people around the world, alleviating suffering in humanitarian crises, and fostering peace and security, and in so doing, advances the Sustainable Development Goals.

Planning highlights

On June 9, 2017, Canada launched a new Feminist International Assistance Policy. Through this policy, Global Affairs Canada is transforming what it does and how it will do it. This policy outlines six interlinked areas of action for Canada’s international assistance efforts: gender equality and empowerment for women and girls; human dignity; growth that works for everyone; environment and climate action; inclusive governance; and peace and security. As a result of this new policy, the department will focus on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls in a manner that is both targeted and crosscutting in all action areas. As such, by 2021-22 no less than 95 percent of Canada’s bilateral international development assistance initiatives will target or integrate gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is a global action plan to eradicate poverty and foster equality, prosperity and peace around the world. Its 17 goals address the global community.

Sustainable Development Goal #5—achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls—is the entry point for Canada’s international assistance and will drive progress in other SDGs. Canada is committed to advancing the SDGs at home and in its work abroad.

Moreover, the policy commits Canada to direct no less than 50 percent of Canada’s annual bilateral international development assistance to sub-Saharan African countries by 2020-21.

Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.

The new Feminist International Assistance Policy positions Canada as a champion for women and girls everywhere.

Canada has committed $150 million in funding over five years to support local women’s rights organizations through its Women’s Voice and Leadership Program. Through this program, the department will support the activities of local, national and regional women’s organizations in the Global South, including, supporting their institutional capacity, and promoting network and alliance-building among them. Program initiatives will be designed to respond to the self-identified priorities and needs of local women’s organizations, which play a critical role in supporting and creating an enabling environment for the empowerment and rights of women and girls.

Global Affairs Canada continues to promote and advance the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls. Sexual and reproductive health and rights are not only a health issue but also a human rights and gender equality issue. In March 2017, the Prime Minister announced $650 million in funding to close gaps in sexual and reproductive health and rights, which includes comprehensive sexuality education, family planning, prevention of and response to sexual and gender-based violence, and reproductive health services, including safe and legal abortion, and post-abortion care. In July 2017, as part of the $650 million in funding, the Minister of International Development announced up to $241.5 million in funding for projects supporting sexual and reproductive health and rights, with a focus on humanitarian and conflict settings and meeting the needs of adolescents. The Minister simultaneously announced that Canada would join Family Planning 2020 and the Ouagadougou Partnership.

Canada will also help address sexual and gender-based violence by engaging with global initiatives, such as the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children and Girls Not Brides. Through initiatives like these, the department will work with other governments, UN organizations and civil society to address the unacceptably high rates of sexual and gender-based violence experienced by women and girls. This includes targeted activities to improve access to quality education and health services; supporting local organizations and girls’ clubs; working with traditional and religious groups and engaging men and boys to address the social norms and gender inequality that perpetuate sexual and gender-based violence.

Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security 2017-22Footnote iii outlines a whole-of-government approach and ensures activities in fragile and conflict-affected states align with broader commitments on gender equality, respect and full participation, inclusion in decision making and empowerment of women and girls. Conflict prevention, peacemaking and post-conflict reform present unique opportunities for transformative progress on gender equality and for building more inclusive, equal and stable societies.

Canada will continue to leverage its position in international institutions, such as the United Nations (UN), the Commonwealth, La Francophonie, and the G7, to be a voice for gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls. Global Affairs Canada will also bring attention to issues related to women and girls’ health and rights through its international engagement in movements, initiatives and funds such as the Every Woman Every Child; SheDecides; Family Planning 2020; Women Deliver; Scaling Up Nutrition; the Global Financing Facility in support of Every Woman Every Child; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; Gavi The Vaccine Alliance; Nutrition International; and the World Health Organization.

Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to work to strengthen partnerships that will promote and protect the human rights of the poorest, most marginalized and most vulnerable people. Global Affairs Canada will also continue to strengthen governance capacity of governments at all levels to establish inclusive and accountable institutions to ensure public services better respond to the needs of all people. Through the Addis Tax Initiative, the department will focus on increasing domestic resource mobilization and improving the transparency and fairness of tax systems.

Global Affairs Canada works to improve the health and well-being of the poorest and most vulnerable through initiatives focused on health and nutrition that have the greatest potential to reduce gender inequalities and that deliver transformative change for women and girls. The department will, advance the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls, which includes comprehensive sexuality education and family planning services; contraception, safe and legal abortion and post abortion care. The department will also support better nutrition, access to immunization, increased inclusive and equitable access to gender-sensitive health services, strengthened health and data systems, and efforts to combat HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, and eradicate Polio.

Education is a powerful empowerment tool for girls and boys. Global Affairs Canada will continue to build on Canada’s history as a leader in education and to collaborate on initiatives to support quality education and skills training programs that help break the cycle of poverty for girls and boys. One such initiative is the Global Partnership for Education for which, on January 25, 2018, the Prime Minister announced the Government of Canada will provide $180 million over three years (2018-20) for targeted support for girls’ education and to help strengthen education systems in developing and fragile countries.

Global Affairs Canada will also work to improve the economic well-being of the poorest and most vulnerable and reduce poverty, particularly among women and girls, to ensure that economic growth works for everyone. This will be done by working through bilateral channels as well as multilateral organizations, including the multilateral development banks and new partners, to create innovative solutions and opportunities to improve the economic well-being of those in need. To advance women’s economic empowerment, Canada supports the G20 Women Entrepreneurs Finance Initiative, which aims to achieve results for women-owned and women-led small and medium-sized enterprises in developing countries.

Environmental sustainability is critical to safeguarding development gains as environmental degradation and climate change threaten physical, social and economic well-being. To promote environmental sustainability, combat climate change and support agriculture, Global Affairs Canada will continue to support climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts to increase the resilience of communities and countries with bilateral and multilateral partners, including multilateral development banks and environment funding facilities. Canada will continue to deliver on its commitment to provide $2.65 billion in climate financing by 2020-21 to support the transition of developing countries to low-carbon, climate-resilient economies and societies.

Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.

Canada will continue to be a leader in gender-responsive humanitarian action to alleviate suffering of the most vulnerable of populations in the world. Global Affairs Canada will provide humanitarian assistance to populations affected by natural disasters and man-made conflicts in developing countries, fragile and conflict affected states. Their critical needs will be met through the delivery of appropriate, timely, well-coordinated, and gender-responsive humanitarian assistance provided on the basis of needs. The department will also provide assistance in early recovery, where appropriate, including for populations that are forcibly displaced.

Global Affairs Canada responds to crises by funding experienced humanitarian partners (UN agencies, the Red Cross Movement and non-governmental organizations) and by deploying relief supplies and technical experts. The department helps partners provide food, water, health care including comprehensive sexual and reproductive health, sanitation and shelter to crisis-affected populations, while seeking their protection, including from sexual and gender-based violence. All assistance is provided in line with the humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality, and independence. In the event of catastrophic natural disasters abroad, Global Affairs Canada coordinates the whole-of-government response based on the full humanitarian toolkit, which in addition to the above mechanisms can include deployment of military assets and personnel as a last resort.

Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.

Canada is committed to building a more peaceful and secure world. Global Affairs Canada will remain vigilant in addressing international peace and security challenges, including those stemming from instability, state fragility, international crime, terrorism, violent extremism, and illicit arms proliferation. Canada’s peace and security assistance, including Canada’s National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, contributes to a broader feminist foreign policy by taking an inclusive, gender-responsive approach. A key facet of Canada’s approach to fostering peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages is to provide support to partner states to build their local capacity to counter terrorism and crime. This capacity building includes strengthening the states’ investigative, legislative and judicial capacities and providing improvements to infrastructure, equipment and training to allow these states to better manage their own security.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to implement multiple approaches to addressing pressing security concerns, including through targeted stabilization programming in fragile and conflict-affected states and the deployment of Canadian civilian experts. The department will increase and align its police deployments in partnership with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Public Safety Canada, through the Canadian Police Arrangement, to contribute to Canada’s broader commitments on peace operations and to help support improved UN effectiveness.

The Elsie Initiative on Women in Peace Operations

The recently announced Elsie Initiative on Women in Peace Operations aims to pilot new approaches to increase the representation and effectiveness of women in UN peacekeeping operations, in uniformed military and policing roles.

Canada is advancing innovative approaches to addressing the challenges posed by child soldiers in peacekeeping contexts, increasing the participation of women in peace operations, and providing the specialized capacities and training that the UN needs to deliver on its mandate. In line with the Minister of Foreign Affairs’ mandate letter commitment from the Prime Minister to increase Canada’s support for UN peace operations, the department will implement the Elsie Initiative on Women in Peace Operations and the Vancouver Principles on Peacekeeping and the Prevention of the Recruitment and Use of Child Soldiers.

Canada will also develop and implement innovative new training programs designed to enhance the overall effectiveness of UN operations. This will include working closely with the Department of National Defence to establish a Canadian Training and Advisory Team to work with a partner nation before and during its deployments to peace operations, as well as to make contributions to UN centres, schools, and mobile training teams with a gender-responsive approach.

Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.

To deliver the most effective results with each dollar of international assistance, Global Affairs Canada will continue to engage with a diverse range of partners and promote new approaches, business models, policy practices, technologies, behavioural insights or ways of delivering products and services that benefit and empower the most vulnerable in developing countries, more specifically women and girls. This includes collaborating with entities like the International Development Innovation Alliance and the Development Assistance Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, where the department is working to increase attention to development innovation and its collective ability to measure the impact of its investments in this space, which support the advancement of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls.

One example of the department reaching out to new partners is the Small and Medium Organizations for Impact and Innovation initiative. Announced in May 2017, it dedicates $100 million over a five-year period to support Canadian small and medium organizations in international assistance in areas consistent with Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy. This initiative is a direct response to feedback received during the 2016 International Assistance Review consultations to provide Canadian organizations with more predictable and accessible opportunities to apply for funding.

Experimenting with innovative approaches

The Small and Medium Organizations (SMOs) Initiative includes a $16.5 million programming window on innovation, which will support SMOs to test new and innovative solutions to pressing development challenges. This will provide learning, data and evidence on development innovations for potential replication and scale-up.

Given that innovation will play a role in achieving Agenda 2030 for Sustainable Development, the department will continue to support innovative finance, climate-smart agriculture and innovative, evidence-based approaches in the area of health, and leverage best practices for scaling up and measuring impact while taking into account gender equality. In line with the focus of Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy on innovation, research and results which will support women and girls empowerment, Global Affairs Canada will engage with Canadian and international innovation actors and build on knowledge, good practice and tools to foster innovative policies, programs and partnerships.

Launched on September 27, 2017, Canada’s Policy for Civil Society Partnerships for International Assistance – A Feminist Approach (CSO Policy) reaffirms Canada’s commitment to working with a robust civil society sector to achieve its international assistance priorities. Aligned with Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy and under the framework of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the CSO Policy represents a positive shift in how Global Affairs Canada engages with the civil society sector. A joint advisory group with civil society organizations and Global Affairs Canada officials has been created to support the effective implementation of the CSO Policy and ensure the objectives outlined in the Policy are met.

The department also seeks the engagement of Canadians, including youth, as global citizens in international development, notably through International Development Week in February, a key platform for the provincial and regional councils for international cooperation and other Canadian partners to exchange knowledge. To facilitate the involvement of Canadians in development efforts, Global Affairs Canada operates the International Youth Internship Program, the International Aboriginal Youth Internships initiative, and the Volunteer Cooperation Program. Each of these programs provides opportunities for Canadians to contribute to sustainable development, gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls in developing countries.

Global Affairs Canada will, through the Canada-Asia Trade and Investment for Growth Regional Development Program, continue to adopt innovative financing approaches to delivering Feminist International Assistance Policy priorities.

Table 7: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2014-15 Actual results2015-16 Actual results2016-17 Actual results
Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.Number of people with access to new technology and practices that improve the environment and address climate change.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of targeted organizations that represent or advocate for the rights of women, children, marginalized groups or at-risk populations.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of entrepreneurs, medium and small size enterprises, and farmers connected to new market and trade opportunities.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of boys and girls that complete their primary and secondary education.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.Percentage of countries that show a decrease in the adolescent fertility rate (number of births/1000 women).Obtain baseline informationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of countries that demonstrate an increase or positive change in women’s access and control over property, financial services, inheritance, natural resources and technology.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.Number of beneficiaries that receive emergency food and nutrition assistance in relation to need and in consideration of international response.Footnote 11Not applicable81.1M
(in 2014)
79.1M
(in 2015)
83.1M
(in 2016)
Number of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDP) assisted and protected.Footnote 11Not applicableRefugees assisted: 10,794,497
IDPs protected/ assisted: 40,017,109
(in 2014)
Refugees assisted: 12,282,792
IDPs protected/ assisted: 48,906,889
(in 2015)
Refugees assisted: 12,903,863
IDPs protected/ assisted: 48,019,097
(in 2016)
Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.Percentage of international assistance that targets fragile and conflict-affected states.50%March 31, 201947.75%45.90%49.29%
Number of Canadian supported actions taken by countries and international organizations to prevent, detect and/or respond to crime, terrorism, and the proliferation of weapons and materials of mass destruction.Obtain Baseline InformationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of activities supported by Canada that demonstrated a positive impact on peace–related processes.Obtain Baseline InformationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.Diversity of partnerships employed in the delivery of international assistance, including with the private sector and foundations.Obtain Baseline InformationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of projects employing innovative approaches in the delivery of international assistance, including experimentation with new partnerships, technologies and/or business models.Obtain Baseline InformationFootnote 10Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Table 8: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018-19 Main Estimates2018-19 Planned spending2019-20 Planned spending2020-21 Planned spending
3,929,834,5933,929,834,5933,325,872,2813,224,360,020
Table 9: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018-19 Planned full-time equivalents2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents2020-21 Planned full-time equivalents
992990990

Core Responsibility 4: Help for Canadians Abroad

Description

Global Affairs Canada provides timely and appropriate consular services for Canadians abroad, contributing to their safety and security.

Planning highlights

As more and more Canadians explore remote corners of the world, work or volunteer abroad, participate in international student exchanges and retire in exotic and sunny locations, Global Affairs Canada remains committed to providing effective and efficient consular services to support Canadians across the globe. The department continues to improve and further modernize consular service delivery to reflect the evolving consular landscape and will take into account the recommendations from evaluations of the consular program, including the Independent Audit Report from the Office of the Auditor General of Canada, and the House of Commons Parliamentary Committee study on the provision of consular services to Canadians abroad.

Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.

Improving travel advice and advisories

Global Affairs Canada will use public opinion research and usability testing to learn more about Canadians’ attitudes and behaviours in respect of international travel in order to improve its travel advice and advisories.

Timely information is critical to ensuring that Canadians receive the best possible consular assistance, especially when they are faced with an unexpected situation abroad. During international crises, the department will provide proactive and timely updates via travel.gc.ca and disseminated through social media channels, including the Travel Smart app.Footnote iv

Global Affairs Canada will continue to provide high-quality, uninterrupted emergency consular assistance to Canadians faced with unexpected situations abroad through its 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre and through a highly trained and capable team of core responders.

Global Affairs Canada will also make improvements to its digital communications tools to ensure that Canadians have access to up-to-date information on travelling safely and responsibly abroad, including through regular updates of the department’s Travel Advice and Advisories available on travel.gc.ca. New online tools and applications, such as “Ask TravelFootnote v, will continue to be expanded to provide Canadians with better access to the information they need to make safe and smart travel decisions.

Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services.

Global Affairs Canada is committed to delivering service excellence to Canadians, which includes providing timely and appropriate government services, such as notarial, passport and citizenship services.

The department will also experiment with new approaches to service delivery for routine and transactional services. These small-scale projects will apply behavioural insights to measure the impact of minor changes to routine service delivery in order to focus resources on the highest priority cases involving Canadians abroad.

Table 10: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2014–15 Actual results2015–16 Actual results2016–17 Actual results
Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.Number of Canadians who use the department’s travel outreach products, including digital initiatives.Footnote 12Annual visits to travel.gc.ca:
5% increase
March 31, 201927.65% increase
(11,611,845 visits)
12.62% increase
(13,076,815 visits)
9.58% increase
(14,329,347 visits)
Total installations of Travel Smart App annually:
15% increase
N/AN/A53,402
Social media followers:
5% increase
89,500200,425295,053
Percentage of consular cases actioned within 24 hours of being reported to consular officials.Footnote 1390%March 31, 201995%93%95%
Number of Canadians who have been assisted through the 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre.Not applicable69,37261,60751,157
Timely response to international emergencies.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 14Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of Canadian clients who expressed satisfaction with the service(s) received.90%March 31, 201992%94%92%
Percentage of services that met the established service standards.Passports:  90% Citizenship:  85%March 31, 2019Passports: 95% Citizenship 95%Passports: 93% Citizenship 90%Passports: 91% Citizenship 86%
Table 11: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates2018–19 Planned spending2019–20 Planned spending2020–21 Planned spending
46,134,99246,134,99246,650,11446,644,895
Table 12: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents2020–21  Planned full-time equivalents
367367367

Core Responsibility 5: Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad

Description

Global Affairs Canada manages and delivers resources, infrastructure and services enabling Canada’s presence abroad, including at embassies, high commissions, and consulates.

Planning highlights

Canada requires a robust global network of missions, including embassies, high commissions, and consulates, in order to meet its departmental results of serving Canadians abroad, supporting Canadian businesses to reach global markets, promoting Canada’s interests and values internationally, and helping to improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable people across the world. To enable Global Affairs Canada and its 31 partner organizations located at missions (federal and provincial government departments, agencies and Crown corporations) to meet their international objectives, the department provides strategic governance, efficient and cost-effective common services and infrastructure.

Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.

Global Affairs Canada is transforming the way it manages its network of missions abroad through a number of modernization initiatives. The department will improve project management, service delivery, access to data and real property decision making. It will also continue to consolidate the administration of financial, human resources and contracting services at missions.

Greening government

The department will continue to strengthen the sustainability of its operations abroad through responsible environmental stewardship, climate resilience and security, showcasing sustainability commitments, and supporting its people and communities abroad.

Government of Canada employees at missions serve as Canada’s face and voice around the world and are critical to achieving departmental goals. To support these employees, Global Affairs Canada manages the terms and conditions of employment abroad for the entire Government of Canada. This includes the sound management of Foreign Service Directives payments for Canada-based staff abroad, as well as pension and insurance benefits and affiliation in local social security programs for locally engaged staff.

To better support Canada-based staff and their dependents, the department is enhancing the delivery of Foreign Service Directives payments through the development and enhancement of tools and processes. Global Affairs Canada will also continue its leadership role in Foreign Service Directives governance, including through the drafting of employer-side proposals and participation in the National Joint Council’s cyclical review.

Global Affairs Canada will work with its partners in the Public Service Commission and Treasury Board Secretariat to develop and implement an enhanced framework of rules governing the employment of locally engaged staff. The department is also working to modernize the locally engaged staff classification system.

Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.

Protecting Canada’s missions and people abroad

To ensure the government is fulfilling its duty of care obligations, Global Affairs Canada is receiving funding of $760 million over six years, starting in 2017–18, and $127 million per year, ongoing, to ensure that its network of people and missions abroad can do their work in safety and security.

The department treats the safety and security of mission staff, their dependents, and all mission visitors as a top priority. A duty of care exists no matter where in the world Canadian government employees are employed. This obligation is especially important in countries where personal security risks are an ongoing concern due to unpredictable political situations, hostile actions and/or civil unrest.

The volatile global security environment poses a risk to people, information and assets, as well as Canada’s ability to meet its international objectives. To address these risks, the department will implement additional protection measures using funding laid out in the Government of Canada’s 2017 Fall Economic Statement for its duty of care obligations. This funding will be used toward investments in emergency preparedness, security training, infrastructure, equipment, information technology, and intelligence gathering worldwide, with particular support for Government of Canada operations in Afghanistan. 

The department is also implementing a framework that will establish a structure for effective, efficient and integrated security risk management and will enable strategic priority setting and resource allocation, informed decision making and ultimately improve the security of employees, information and assets. The Framework incorporates and synthesizes existing corporate governance and security risk analysis functions and strengthens both elements by introducing a risk-based decision-making process for the allocation of security resources.

Table 13: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2014–15 Actual results2015–16 Actual results2016–17 Actual results
Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.Percentage of partner organizations, indicating the resources, infrastructure, and services provided abroad met their needs.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 15Not available New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of the replacement value of the department’s real property portfolio spent on repairs, maintenance, and recapitalization.2%March 31, 20191%1%1%
Percentage of Crown-owned properties abroad that were rated in good and fair condition based on the condition categories in the Directory of Federal Real Property.85%March 31, 201989.04%89.6%87.05%
Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.Number of security risk mitigation measures that address the priority risks identified in the Departmental Security Plan that are implemented.20151920
Table 14: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates2018–19 Planned spending2019–20 Planned spending2020–21 Planned spending
1,044,513,1271,044,513,1271,002,805,195986,425,740
Table 15: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents
4,3454,3454,345

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Footnote vi

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Table 16: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates2018–19 Planned spending2019–20 Planned spending2020–21 Planned spending
251,246,872251,246,872244,725,655242,817,661
Table 17: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents
1,5131,5181,517

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Text version
Departmental Spending Trend Graph ($ Millions)
 2015-162016-172017-182018-192019-202020-21
Statutory432.2413.8381.1378.1372.7372.1
Voted5,564.65,846.36,317.06,112.75,392.85,262.1
Total5,996.96,260.06,698.16,490.85,765.55,634.2

From 2017-18 to 2020-21, Global Affairs Canada’s spending profile varies from $6.7 billion in 2017-18 to $5.6 billion in 2020-21.

Significant items contributing to the decrease include the following:

Decreases are also attributable to operating and capital carry forward amounts ($101.7 million), which are included in 2017-18 but not future year figures.

These decreases are offset by an increase of $47.8 million for funding to support mission security abroad to mitigate risks to physical infrastructure, mission readiness, and securing of information.

Expenditures for 2015-16 and 2016-17 reflect the financial information previously reported in the Departmental Results Reports and the Public Accounts.

Table 18: Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services2015–16 Expenditures2016–17 Expenditures2017–18 Forecast spending2018–19 Main Estimates2018–19 Planned spending2019–20 Planned spending2020–21 Planned spending
International Advocacy and Diplomacy988,757,519936,258,0011,073,892,207951,392,177951,392,177876,662,005Footnote 16877,091,447
Trade and Investment176,881,076202,259,561245,993,164267,710,639267,710,639268,738,926256,861,895
Development, Peace and Security Programming3,575,456,1283,907,553,2994,042,284,2543,929,834,5933,929,834,5933,325,872,281Footnote 173,224,360,020
Help for Canadians Abroad48,404,46648,746,98261,451,10246,134,99246,134,99246,650,11446,644,895
Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad928,043,637931,402,8101,023,861,7041,044,513,1271,044,513,1271,002,805,195986,425,740
Subtotal5,717,542,8266,026,220,6536,447,482,4316,239,585,5286,239,585,5285,520,728,5215,391,383,997
Internal Services279,309,740233,804,154250,625,689251,246,872251,246,872244,725,655242,817,661
Total5,996,852,5666,260,024,8076,698,108,1206,490,832,4006,490,832,4005,765,454,1765,634,201,658

Planned human resources

Table 19: Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services2015–16 Actual2016–17 Actual2017–18 Forecast2018–19 Planned2019–20 Planned2020–21 Planned
International Advocacy and Diplomacy2,1902,2102,2572,4422,2552,254
Trade and Investment1,7781,7251,8231,8671,8701,840
Development, Peace and Security Programming9561,006982992990990
Help for Canadians Abroad334336367367367367
Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad4,2054,3764,2644,3454,3454,345
Subtotal9,4739,6549,69210,0139,8279,796
Internal Services1,4151,3491,4671,5131,5181,517
Total10,88811,00311,15911,52611,34511,313

Full-time equivalent(s) (FTE) for previous, current and future years have been realigned to the Core Responsibilities within Global Affairs Canada’s new Departmental Results Framework (effective 2018-19).
For the six-year period from 2015-16 to 2020-21, Global Affairs Canada’s total FTE is relatively constant.
The year-over-year variance in the number of FTE is attributable to the following:

Estimates by vote

For information on Global Affairs Canada’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2018–19 Main Estimates.Footnote vii

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future‑Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Global Affairs Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future‑Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future‑Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on Global Affairs Canada’s website.Footnote viii

Future‑Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information2017–18 Forecast results2018–19 Planned resultsDifference (2018–19 Planned results minus 2017–18 Forecast results)
Total expenses6,521,260,6716,344,871,314(176,389,357)
Total revenues40,857,70042,040,0931,182,393
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers6,480,402,9716,302,831,221(177,571,750)

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate ministers: Chrystia Freeland, Minister of Foreign Affairs; Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie; and François-Philippe Champagne, Minister of International Trade.

Institutional heads: Ian Shugart, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs; Timothy Sargent, Deputy Minister for International Trade; Diane Jacovella, Deputy Minister of International Development; Jonathan Fried, Coordinator, International Economic Relations; and, Peter Boehm, Deputy Minister for the G7 Summit and Personal Representative of the Prime Minister.

Ministerial portfolio: Global Affairs Canada and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service. The following federal entities operate at arm’s length and report to Parliament through the Global Affairs Canada’s ministers: the Canadian Commercial Corporation, Export Development Canada, the International Development Research Centre, and Invest in Canada.

Enabling instrument: Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act, S.C. 2013, c. 33, s. 174Footnote ix

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1909

Raison d’être, mandate and role

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Global Affairs Canada’s website.Footnote x

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on the Global Affairs Canada’s website.Footnote xi

Reporting framework

Global Affairs Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below:

Departmental Results FrameworkProgram Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: International Advocacy and DiplomacyDepartmental Result:
Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.
Indicator: Percentage of advocacy campaigns which met their stated objectives.International Policy Coordination
Trade, Investment and Internal Economic Policy
Indicator: Percentage of diplomatic activities which met their stated objectives.
Multilateral Policy
Indicator: Number of international commitments through which Canada works with partners to address strategic peace and security challenges.International Law
Diplomatic Services and Protocol
Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb Policy and Diplomacy 
Departmental Result:
Canada’s leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.
Indicator: Number of influencers reached through Canadian-hosted events, including events on women’s empowerment and rights and gender equality.Americas Policy and Diplomacy
Asia Pacific Policy and Diplomacy
Sub-Saharan Africa Policy and Diplomacy
Indicator: Percentage of Canadian-led decisions introduced through international and regional organizations that are accepted.Geographic Coordination Mission Support
Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women and Girls
Indicator: Number of Canadians in leadership positions in international institutions.Humanitarian Action
Human Development: Health and Education
Departmental Result:
Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.
Indicator: Percentage of organizations of which Canada is a member, which receive a positive performance rating on any independent evaluation.Growth that Works for Everyone
Environment and Climate Action 
Human Rights, Governance, Democracy and Inclusion
Indicator: Degree to which Canadian position on international legal issues are reflected in the outcome of discussions and negotiations, such as agreements and resolutions.
Peace and Security Policy
 
Indicator: Degree to which actions that are led or supported by Canada support strengthened adherence to international law.
Departmental Result:
Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.
Indicator: Ranking of Canada’s global presence as reflected by our participation in the global economy, our military presence and our people-to-people ties.
Indicator: Ranking of Canada’s reputation abroad as reported in global opinion polls.
Indicator: Percentage of Canadians who are satisfied with Canada’s international engagement.
Core Responsibility 2: Trade and InvestmentDepartmental Result:
Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.
Indicator: Degree to which Canada opens markets and advances trade policy innovations through negotiations, agreements and discussions.Trade Policy, Agreements Negotiations, and Disputes
Trade Controls
Indicator: Degree to which Canada works to resolve or mitigate market access barriers, disputes or other strategic policy issuesInternational Business Development
International Innovation and Investment
Indicator: Percentage of applications for permits and certificates related to trade controls processed in accordance with service standards.Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb Trade
Americas Trade
Asia Pacific Trade
Departmental Result:
Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.
Indicator: Percentage of clients indicating satisfaction with the quality of services delivered by the Trade Commissioner Service.Sub-Saharan Africa Trade  
Indicator: Number of active business clients of the Trade Commissioner Service. 
Indicator: Number of concluded commercial agreements facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Indicator: Number of international research and innovation partnerships facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Departmental Result:
Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.
Indicator: Number of new foreign investments and expansions of existing foreign investments in Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service. 
Indicator: Number of investor visits to Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Core Responsibility 3: Development, Peace and Security ProgrammingDepartmental Result:
Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.
Indicator: Number of people with access to new technology and practices that improve the environment and address climate change.International Assistance Operations
Humanitarian Assistance
Partnerships and Development Innovation
Indicator: Percentage of targeted organizations that represent or advocate for the rights of women, children, marginalized groups or at-risk populations.Multilateral International Assistance
Peace and Stabilization Operations
Anti-Crime and Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building
Indicator: Percentage of entrepreneurs, medium and small size enterprises, and farmers connected to new market and trade opportunities.WMD Threat Reduction
Canada Fund for Local Initiatives
Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb International Assistance
Indicator: Number of boys and girls that complete their primary and secondary education.Americas International Assistance
Asia Pacific International Assistance
Departmental Result:
Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.
Indicator: Percentage of countries that show a decrease in the adolescent fertility rate (number of births/1000 women).Sub-Saharan Africa International Assistance 
Grants and Contributions Policy and Operations
Indicator: Percentage of countries that demonstrate an increase or positive change in women’s access and control over poverty, financial services, inheritance, natural resources and technology. 
Departmental Result:
Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.
Indicator: Number of beneficiaries that receive emergency food and nutrition assistance in relation to need and in consideration of international response.
Indicator: Number of refugees and internally displaced persons assisted and protected.
Departmental Result:
Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.
Indicator: Percentage of international assistance that targets fragile and conflict-affected states.
Indicator: Number of Canadian supported actions taken by countries and international organizations to prevent, detect and/or respond to crime, terrorism, and the proliferation of weapons and materials of mass destruction.
Indicator: Number of activities supported by Canada that demonstrated a positive impact on peace-related processes.
Departmental Result:
Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.
Indicator:
Diversity of partnerships employed in the delivery of international assistance, including with the private sector and foundations.
Indicator: Number of projects employing innovative approaches in the delivery of international assistance, including experimentation with new partnerships, technologies and/or business models.
Core Responsibility 4: Help for Canadians abroadDepartmental Result:
Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.
Indicator: Number of Canadians who use the department’s travel outreach products, including digital initiatives.Consular Assistance and Administrative Services for Canadians Abroad
Emergency Preparedness and Response
Indicator: Percentage of consular cases actioned within 24 hours of being reported to consular officials. 
Indicator: Number of Canadians who have been assisted through the 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre.
Indicator: Timely response to international emergencies.
Departmental Result:
Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services.
Indicator: Percentage of Canadian clients who expressed satisfaction with the service(s) received.
Indicator: Percentage of services that met the established service standards.
Core Responsibility 5: Support for Canada’s Presence AbroadDepartmental Result:
Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure, and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.
Indicator: Percentage of partner organizations, indicating the resources, infrastructure, and services provided abroad met their needs.Platform Corporate Services
Foreign Service Directives
Client Relations and Mission Operations
Indicator: Percentage of the replacement value of the department’s real property portfolio spent on repairs, maintenance, and recapitalization.Locally Engaged Staff Services
Real Property Planning and Stewardship
Real Property Project Delivery, Professional and Technical Services
Indicator: Percentage of Crown-owned properties abroad that were rated in good and fair condition based on the condition categories in the Directory of Federal Real Property.
Mission Readiness and Security
Mission Network Information Management / Information Technology
Departmental Result:
Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.
Indicator: Number of security risk mitigation measures that address the priority risks identified in the Departmental Security Plan that are implemented. 
Internal Services Management & Oversight
Communications
Legal Services
Human Resources
Financial Management
Information Management
Information Technology
Real Property (Domestic)
Materiel Management
Acquisition Management
Concordance between the Departmental Results Framework and the Program Inventory, 2018–19, and the Program Alignment Architecture, 2017–18
Percentages in this table were based on the allocation of 2018-19 budget by Program Alignment Architecture stated in 2017-18 reference levels aligned with the relevant Programs in Global Affairs Canada’s 2018-19 Program Inventory.
2018–19 Core Responsibilities and Program Inventory2017–18 Sub-Program Alignment ArchitecturePercentage of Sub-Program Alignment Architecture program (dollars) corresponding to the program in the Program Inventory
Core Responsibility 1: International Advocacy and Diplomacy
1. International Policy Coordination
2. Trade, Investment and International Economic Policy
3. Multilateral Policy
4. International Law
5. Diplomatic Services and Protocol
6. Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb Policy & Diplomacy
7. Americas Policy & Diplomacy
8. Asia Pacific Policy & Diplomacy
9. Sub-Saharan Africa Policy & Diplomacy
10. Geographic Coordination and Mission Support
11. Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women and Girls
12. Humanitarian Action
13. Human Development: Health & Education
14. Growth that Works for Everyone
15. Environment, and Climate Action
16. Human Rights, Governance, Democracy & Inclusion
17. Peace and Security Policy
1.1.1 International Information and Analysis100%
1.1.2 International Policy Advice100%
1.2.1 Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy96%
1.2.2 Summitry and Multilateral Diplomacy and Advocacy100%
1.2.3 Assessed Contributions to International Organizations99%
Core Responsibility 2: Trade and Investment
18. Trade Policy, Agreements Negotiations, Agreements and Disputes1.2.3 Assessed Contributions to International Organizations1%
1.2.4 Trade Agreements, Negotiations, Dispute Settlement and Controls87%
19. Trade Controls1.2.4 Trade Agreements, Negotiations, Dispute Settlement and Controls13%
20. International Business Development2.1.1 International Business Development through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad47%
2.1.2 Foreign Direct Investment in Canada43%
21. International Innovation and Investment2.1.3 International Innovation, Science and Technology65%
22. Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb Trade
23. Americas Trade
24. Asia Pacific Trade
25. Sub-Saharan Africa Trade
2.1.1 International Business Development through Promotion of Exports and Trade in Canada and Abroad53%
2.1.2 Foreign Direct Investment in Canada57%
2.1.3 International Innovation, Science and Technology35%
Core Responsibility 3: Development, Peace and Security Programming
26. International Assistance Operations
28. Partnerships and Development Innovation
29. Multilateral International Assistance
3.1.2 Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law99%
3.2.1 Sustainable Economic Growth49%
3.2.2 Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health51%
3.2.3 Food Security44%
3.2.4 Multisector Assistance, Social Development, and Development Engagement54%
27. Humanitarian Assistance3.3.1 Humanitarian Programming
3.3.2 Partners for Humanitarian Assistance
100%
100%
30. Peace and Stabilization Operations3.1.1 International Security and Threat Reduction71%
31. Anti-Crime and Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building3.1.1 International Security and Threat Reduction6%
32. WMD Threat Reduction3.1.1 International Security and Threat Reduction23%
33. Canada Fund for Local Initiatives1.2.1 Bilateral and Regional Diplomacy and Advocacy4%
34. Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb International Assistance
35. Americas International Assistance
36. Asia Pacific International Assistance
37. Sub-Saharan Africa International Assistance
3.2.1 Sustainable Economic Growth51%
3.2.2 Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health49%
3.2.3 Food Security56%
3.2.4 Multisector Assistance, Social Development, and Development Engagement46%
38. Grants and Contributions Policy and Operations3.1.2 Advancing Democracy, Human Rights, Freedom, and the Rule of Law1%
3.2.1 Sustainable Economic Growth0%
3.2.2 Children and Youth, including Maternal, Newborn and Child Health0%
3.2.3 Food Security0%
3.2.4 Multisector Assistance, Social Development, and Development Engagement0%
Core Responsibility 4: Help for Canadians Abroad
39. Consular Assistance and Administrative Services for Canadians Abroad2.2.1 Consular Assistance for Canadians100%
40. Emergency Preparedness and Response2.2.2 Emergency Preparedness and Response100%
Core Responsibility 5: Support for Canada's Presence Abroad
41. Platform Corporate Services4.1.1 Management of Common Services5%
42. Foreign Service Directives4.2.1 Administration of Foreign Service Directives100%
43. Client Relations and Mission Operations4.1.1 Management of Common Services95%
44. Locally Engaged Staff Services4.1.5 Locally Engaged Staff Supporting Other Government Departments100%
4.2.2 Administration of Locally Engaged Staff Pension, Insurance and Social Security Programs100%
45. Real Property Planning and Stewardship4.1.2 Real Property55%
46. Real Property Project Delivery, Professional and Technical Services4.1.2 Real Property45%
47. Mission Readiness and Security4.1.3 Security100%
48. Mission Network Information Management / Information Technology4.1.4 Information Management / Information Technology100%
Internal ServicesInternal Services100%

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.Footnote xii

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Global Affairs Canada’s websiteFootnote xiii:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures.Footnote xiv This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Global Affairs Canada
Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
TTY: 1-800-394-3472 (toll-free from the U.S. and Canada only); 613-944-1310 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709
www.international.gc.ca

Enquiries Services
Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0G2
Email: enqserv@international.gc.ca
Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709

Other Portfolio Related Contacts

Canadian Commercial Corporation
350 Albert Street, 7th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 0S6
Tel.: 1-800-748-8191 (toll-free in Canada);
613-996-0034 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)                                                          
Fax: 613-995-2121
www.ccc.ca

Export Development Canada
150 Slater Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 1K3
Tel.: 1-800-229-0575 (toll-free North America);
613-598-2500 (local)
TTY: 1-866-574-0451
Fax: 613-598-3811
www.edc.ca

International Development Research Centre
150 Kent Street
Ottawa, ON K1P 0B2
Postal Address: P.O. Box 8500
Ottawa, ON K1G 3H9
Tel.: 613-236-6163
Fax: 613-238-7230
www.idrc.ca

International Joint Commission (Canadian Section)
234 Laurier Avenue West, 22nd Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 6K6
Tel.: 613-995-2984
Fax: 613-993-5583
www.ijc.org

Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission
459 Route 774
Welshpool, NB E5E 1A4
Tel.: 1-877-851-6663 (toll-free); 506-752-2922 (local)
Fax: 506-752-6000
www.fdr.net

Invest in Canada
www.investcanada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches to inform evidence-based decision making by learning what works and what does not.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences to consider multiple identity factors that intersect to make people who they are (such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability).
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (by Cabinet, a central agency, etc.) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)Footnote 18
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
public diplomacy (diplomatie publique)
The process to inform and influence “publics” so that international policy objectives can be better achieved. While the department’s focus is mostly on foreign publics, domestic audiences may also be included when they are important to achieving the department’s international goals. Traditional state-to-state diplomacy and public diplomacy are not mutually exclusive, and public diplomacy activities will often incorporate official state actors.
results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long‑term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Footnotes

Footnote i

Sustainable Development Technology Canada, https://www.sdtc.ca/en

Return to footnote i referrer

Footnote ii

Clean Growth Hub, http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/099.nsf/eng/home

Return to footnote ii referrer

Footnote iii

National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, http://international.gc.ca/world-monde/issues_development-enjeux_developpement/gender_equality-egalite_sexes/cnap_ip-pi_pnac-17-22.aspx?lang=eng

Return to footnote iii referrer

Footnote iv

Travel Smart app, https://travel.gc.ca/mobile

Return to footnote iv referrer

Footnote v

Ask Travel, https://travel.gc.ca/assistance/ask-travel

Return to footnote v referrer

Footnote vi

GC InfoBase, https://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/edb-bdd/index-eng.html#start

Return to footnote vi referrer

Footnote vii

2017–18 Main Estimates, https://www.canada.ca/en/treasury-board-secretariat/services/planned-government-spending/government-expenditure-plan-main-estimates.html

Return to footnote vii referrer

Footnote viii

Future-Oriented Financial Statements, http://international.gc.ca/gac-amc/publications/finance/fs-ef/fs-ef_2017-2018.aspx?lang=eng

Return to footnote viii referrer

Footnote ix

Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act, http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/f-27.5/fulltext.html

Return to footnote ix referrer

Footnote x

Global Affairs Canada: 2018-19 Departmental Plan Supplementary Information, http://international.gc.ca/gac-amc/publications/plans/dp-pm_1819_mandate-mandat.aspx?lang=eng

Return to footnote x referrer

Footnote xi

Global Affairs Canada: 2018-19 Departmental Plan Supplementary Information, http://international.gc.ca/gac-amc/publications/plans/dp-pm/dp-pm_1819_mandate-mandat.aspx?lang=eng#oc

Return to footnote xi referrer

Footnote xii

GC InfoBase, https://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/ems-sgd/edb-bdd/index-eng.html#start

Return to footnote xii referrer

Footnote xiii

Global Affairs Canada: 2018-19 Departmental Plan Supplementary Information, http://international.gc.ca/gac-amc/publications/plans/dp-pm/dp-pm_1819_sup.aspx?lang=eng

Return to footnote xiii referrer

Footnote xiv

Report on Federal Tax Expenditures, http://www.fin.gc.ca/purl/taxexp-eng.asp

Return to footnote xiv referrer

Footnote 1

Latin American trade bloc that includes Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru.

Return to footnote 1 referrer

Footnote 2

South American trade bloc that includes Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay.

Return to footnote 2 referrer

Footnote 4

Latin American trade bloc that includes Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru.

Return to footnote 4 referrer

Footnote 5

South American trade bloc that includes Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay.

Return to footnote 5 referrer

Footnote 18

Under the Policy on Results, the Program Alignment Architecture has been replaced by the Program Inventory.

Return to footnote 18 referrer

Date Modified: