Departmental Plan 2019-20

ISSN 2371-7688

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Table of Contents

Ministers’ message

The Honourable Chrystia Freeland
The Honourable Chrystia Freeland
Minister of Foreign Affairs
The Honourable James Gordon Carr
The Honourable James Gordon Carr
Minister of International Trade Diversification
The Honourable Maryam Monsef
The Honourable Maryam Monsef
Minister of International Development and Minister for Women and Gender Equality
The Honourable Mélanie Joly
The Honourable Mélanie Joly
Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie

Our focus is on Canadians and their interests at home and abroad. 

This means standing up for human rights, women’s empowerment, gender equality, peaceful pluralism, inclusion, respect for diversity, democracy and the rule of law.

We are doing this through Canadian leadership in vital multilateral institutions that uphold our shared principles and the rules-based international order.

We are doing this by pursuing a diversified, rules-based and inclusive approach to trade, one where all segments of society enjoy the economic opportunities flowing from trade and investment.

We are doing this by implementing our Feminist International Assistance Policy, which seeks to eradicate poverty and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Together with a broad range of partners, we work to support the poorest and most vulnerable, as well as the health, rights and well-being of women and girls. We are doing this through the first ever Gender Equality Advisory Council, created during Canada’s G7 presidency, and this year France will bolster this Canadian initiative.

We are doing this by paying special attention to women and youth in our activities as part of La Francophonie, including the implementation of a strategy for La Francophonie on gender equality, as well as working on setting up a digital platform to share French-language content across La Francophonie.

A more peaceful, prosperous and inclusive world is in our interest and in our sights. Our work continues, and Canada will rise to the challenge.

Plans at a glance and operating context

Global Affairs Canada will continue to deliver results on the Government of Canada’s commitments to preserve and support Canadian prosperity and security, and to contribute to a more just, inclusive, and sustainable world, in a gender-responsive manner.

Global Affairs Canada is implementing Canada’s Feminist Foreign Policy and its suite of feminist international policies, programs and initiatives across its commitments in diplomacy, trade, security, development and consular services. The Feminist Foreign Policy recognizes that fostering rights-based, open and inclusive societies, where all people, regardless of their gender, can fully benefit from equal participation in economic, political, social and cultural life, is an effective way to build a safer and more prosperous world.

To support this work in 2019-20, the department will focus on four priorities:

1. Revitalizing the rules-based international order

Global Affairs Canada will continue to engage constructively with regional, bilateral and multilateral partners in driving positive action on global issues such as strengthening global peace and security operations, promoting the rule of law, advancing inclusive approaches to trade, reducing poverty, advancing gender equality, combatting climate change, and mitigating cyber threats.

Global Affairs Canada will also work with partners to protect, reform, and renew the rules-based international order and to advance Canada’s interests in key international forums, including campaigning for a seat on the United Nations Security Council for 2021–22.

2. Eradicating Poverty

Global Affairs Canada will continue implementing its Feminist International Assistance Policy, released in June 2017, which seeks to eradicate poverty and build a more peaceful, more inclusive and more prosperous world.

Canada recognizes that promoting gender equality and empowering women and girls to reach their full potential is the most effective approach to achieving this goal. Global Affairs Canada’s international assistance will contribute to eradicating poverty, increasing opportunity for people around the world, alleviating suffering in humanitarian crises, and fostering peace and security, and in doing so, advances the Sustainable Development Goals, which aim to eradicate poverty by 2030.

3. Pursuing diversified, modern and inclusive trade

Global Affairs Canada is committed to an inclusive trade agenda that supports all segments of society in taking advantage of the economic opportunities flowing from trade and investment. Global Affairs Canada will continue to champion a more inclusive approach to trade, including by supporting women entrepreneurs with targeted products and services to help them better integrate in the global marketplace, and by promoting a more inclusive approach in Canada’s free trade agreements.

Global Affairs Canada will work to deepen and diversify trade relationships through increased and diversified international trade and foreign direct investment and will contribute to inclusive prosperity to ensure that the benefits of trade are widely shared. Through consultations that inform our approaches, the department will also continue to pursue modern and inclusive approaches with trading partners in important areas such as transparency, labour rights, the environment, small and medium-sized enterprises, gender, and Indigenous peoples.

4. Strengthening Canada’s place in North America

The Government of Canada is committed to further strengthening relations with Canada’s key allies, partners and neighbours to the south — the United States and Mexico.

Global Affairs Canada will deepen engagement with the U.S. and Mexico, including with relevant federal, state and local governments, private sector and civil society organizations on key areas such as trade, investment, innovation, security, energy and the environment.

Global Affairs Canada will collaborate with other government departments and other levels of government, in a whole-of-Canada approach to the two bilateral relationships and the trilateral relationship, to enhance competitiveness; increase commercial ties; advance modern border management; cooperate on energy infrastructure and security; advance environmental action; and support efforts to address global and continental issues and threats.

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The department has a long history of being entrepreneurial and innovative in its work, and is experimenting with new approaches in some areas. Building awareness and capacity related to experimentation, implementing a data strategy, and promoting innovation will continue to enable Global Affairs Canada to deliver better results on its international agenda.

In advancing the above four priorities, Global Affairs Canada may be exposed to a number of factors that stem from the complex and volatile context in which the department operates. This includes pressures related to the rise of protectionism, unilateralism, populism and authoritarianism, and the effects of violent extremism, social instability and poverty.

Through country, regional and multilateral engagements, the department will continue to confront cross-border challenges that impact all citizens. Addressing global issues such as the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, cyber threats, irregular migration and climate change, among many others, requires an international order based on rules and that ensure benefits for all.

For more information on Global Affairs Canada’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Planned results” section of this report.

Planned results: what we want to achieve this year and beyond

Core Responsibilities

Core Responsibility 1: International Advocacy and Diplomacy

Description

Global Affairs Canada promotes Canada’s interests and values through the development of policy and the fostering of international law, diplomacy, advocacy, and effective engagement.

Planning highlights

Canada will work with a wide range of partners to protect, reform, and renew the current rules-based international order and to achieve common global goals. Through effective advocacy and diplomacy efforts, Global Affairs Canada will continue to advance Canadian values and interests internationally, including human rights, democratic and inclusive governance, growth that works for everyone, respect for diversity, gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, peace and security, and environmental sustainability.

Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.

International cooperation is required to address many of the most important challenges facing the world today. Global Affairs Canada will work with international partners and collaborate with other departments and agencies to advance Canada’s values and interests at home and abroad. This includes continued engagement, diplomacy and advocacy with bilateral partners and through multilateral organizations such as the United Nations, NATO, the G7, the G20, La Francophonie, the Commonwealth and regional organizations. Canada will coordinate the G7 Rapid Response Mechanism, which is mandated to strengthen G7 coordination to identify and respond to foreign threats to democracy.

Global Affairs Canada will deepen engagement with the U.S. and Mexico, including with relevant federal, state and local governments, private sector and civil society organizations. The department will continue targeted diplomacy and advocacy efforts on a range of issues including trade, investment, innovation, security, energy and the environment.

Global Affairs Canada will also work closely with long-standing partners in Europe on a range of foreign affairs, trade and security related, and environmental matters, including through implementation of the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement and Strategic Partnership Agreement, the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement, and various Canada-United Kingdom and Canada-France initiatives.

The department will engage with Arctic and targeted non-Arctic states to advance Canada’s interests in the Arctic, including the areas of science, sustainable socio-economic and cultural development, and environmental protection in the Canadian North, and will explore options toward pursuing consultative status in the Antarctic Treaty System. Canada’s circumpolar interests will be promoted at the Arctic Council and with other relevant bodies, in cooperation with territorial, provincial and northern Indigenous partners.

Canada-Asia Advantage

Global Affairs Canada will implement the Canada-Asia Advantage, an outreach strategy to heighten awareness of and support for Canada’s goals in Asia Pacific, including prosperity, development, inclusion, sustainability, peace, and security.

Global Affairs Canada will advance comprehensive engagement with China while standing up for Canadian values and interests, strengthen engagement with India, Japan and the Republic of Korea, and renew engagement with Pakistan. The department will also reinforce Canada’s role in key multilateral forums in Asia and efforts aimed at enhancing peace and security in the region, with a focus on the Korean Peninsula. Canada will continue to seek a long-lasting and durable solution to the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar and Bangladesh through bilateral and multilateral political engagement, humanitarian assistance, as well as long-term development programming.

In an effort to promote peace, stability and dialogue in the Middle East, Global Affairs Canada will advance Canada’s bilateral and multilateral relationships in Israel, the West Bank, Gaza, Egypt and Maghreb. The department will also support the advancement of democracy and stability in various countries, including Ukraine. In collaboration with Canadian and international stakeholders, the department will continue to implement the whole-of-government strategy for Canada’s diplomatic, development and security/stabilization engagement in Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Lebanon.

In Latin America and the Caribbean, Global Affairs Canada will continue to support efforts to advance a progressive, feminist agenda that promotes gender equality, human rights, prosperity, resilience and democratic governance. Canada will leverage international assistance to bring new partnerships to priority sectors and regions. The department will also continue to support reconstruction and longer-term climate resilience in the Caribbean, as well as responses to the political, economic and humanitarian crises in Venezuela and Nicaragua.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, Global Affairs Canada will advance Canada’s political, development, security, and economic interests with a feminist approach, through bilateral and multilateral engagement, including through the African Union, Regional Economic Communities, La Francophonie, the Commonwealth, like-minded partners, and multilateral institutions. The department will continue to leverage engagement in these areas as a means to reduce poverty, contribute to political stability, and advance democracy in the region.

Canada's leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.

Global Affairs Canada champions the rule of law and values inclusive and accountable governance, including by promoting democracy, civil society space, human rights, women’s empowerment and gender equality, freedom of religion or belief, inclusion, and respect for diversity, including in digital and online spaces. In support of this, Global Affairs Canada will ensure that gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls are integrated into or targeted across all its international policies and programming. The department will continue to give priority to promoting and protecting the human rights of marginalized and vulnerable groups, including LGBTQ2 and intersex communities and human rights defenders. Through bilateral and multilateral engagements, including at the United Nations, the United Nations Human Rights Council, La Francophonie, the Commonwealth and the Organization of American States, Global Affairs Canada will promote inclusion and respect for diversity. The department will also champion human rights, both on and offline, by addressing human rights abuses and violations internationally, including through sanctions.

Global Affairs Canada will advance its international peace and security interests through continuing efforts on conflict prevention, stabilization, and peacebuilding, and by countering terrorism, crime and violent radicalization through multilateral frameworks and leadership in international institutions. This includes through: active participation in NATO and regional security organizations, such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations regional forum, the Global Coalition against Daesh, and the Global Counterterrorism Forum; shaping the negotiations for a follow-up mechanism to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its three Protocols; working with like-minded nations to shape negotiations for an additional Protocol to the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime; and active participation in the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs and the G7 Roma-Lyon Group. The department will also work multilaterally and bilaterally with partners to further shared agendas on combatting money laundering and terrorist financing, transnational crime, and cyber threats, and on furthering counterterrorism, non-proliferation, arms control and disarmament.

Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.

Through advocacy, outreach and engagement with national and international stakeholders, Global Affairs Canada supports the development of, and compliance with, international law in order to strengthen the rules-based international order. Global Affairs Canada will continue to actively engage with international institutions, such as the United Nations, the International Criminal Court, and the International Court of Justice to uphold the international legal framework and meet its obligations. The department will advance, prosecute and defend Canada’s rights and interests, including at meetings of parties to specific treaties, and before international dispute-settlement mechanisms.

Global Affairs Canada will work to strengthen the international human rights architecture by promoting human rights in various forums ranging from United Nations bodies to the G7. The department will actively participate in the United Nations Human Rights Council and the United Nations General Assembly’s Third Committee — the key multilateral institutions mandated to consider human rights issues. Bilaterally, Canadian missions will engage with governments and support the effort of the local and international civil society to promote respect for human rights in country-specific contexts.

Global Affairs Canada will pursue constructive leadership and engagement in international institutions to support innovation and reforms to improve accountability, transparency, effectiveness and results. This includes the United Nations system broadly, and its peace and security architecture and peacekeeping missions specifically, as well as international financial institutions, La Francophonie, and the Commonwealth. Global Affairs Canada will also contribute to the prevention of, and effective response to, global crises—including by strengthening global conflict management and peacebuilding capabilities and improving the effectiveness of international and Canadian sanctions regimes.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to provide strategic international legal advice to the Government of Canada and reflect Canada’s positions in the development and enforcement of international legal instruments and treaties, with a focus on cybercrime, human rights, biodiversity, oceans and the environment. The department will also advance Canada’s interests in the Arctic through the preparation and filing of Canada’s submission on the outer limits of its continental shelf in the Arctic Ocean. This will help protect Canada’s sovereign rights over the shelf’s natural resources and preserve its jurisdiction over other Arctic initiatives and activities, in areas such as shipping, fisheries, and marine scientific research.

Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to engage constructively with regional, bilateral and multilateral partners in driving positive action on global issues, especially in areas where Canadian action and advocacy can serve to revitalize a rules-based international order. As a convener, connector and catalyst of inclusive change, Canada will build and maintain like-minded coalitions on issues related to advancing gender equality, promoting human rights and the rule of law, supporting inclusion and diversity, including for LGBTQ2 and intersex persons, defending democracy, and combatting climate change, among others. 

This approach is fundamental to the implementation of Canada’s Feminist Foreign Policy, including the Feminist International Assistance Policy, and will ensure that Canada continues to play an active role in developing the global gender equality agenda, and shaping international norms, legal instruments and multilateral institutions to advance women’s rights and their empowerment. Similar engagement will be used to ensure a leadership role for Canada during humanitarian crises, in conflict zones, and in response to country and regional situations such as those found in Ukraine, Myanmar, Venezuela, and on the Korean Peninsula. 

Canada will demonstrate leadership and cultivate shared interests in support of a more just, inclusive and sustainable world. Bilaterally, Canada will deepen its relationships with traditional and emerging partners to cultivate shared interests and promote Canadian values more broadly. Multilaterally, Canada will build  on its recent success in hosting the G7 by continuing to advance issues of Women, Peace and Security, International Humanitarian Law, innovative financing for development, quality education for women and girls, and responses to threats to democracies on the global stage. Global Affairs Canada will also continue to strengthen Canada’s economic position and implement the Agenda 2030 by advancing work on open and inclusive trade, sustainable development and inclusive growth through active engagement in multilateral forums such as the G7, G20, WTO, APEC, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation, including its Development Assistance Committee, La Francophonie, and the Commonwealth. 

In order to further strengthen Canada’s voice on global issues and allow it to better contribute to decision-making processes at the UN, Canada is pursuing a seat on the United Nations Security Council for 2021–22. The department will continue to promote Canada’s United Nations Security Council campaign through its bilateral and multilateral engagements and will prepare for this potential opportunity to build a more inclusive, peaceful and prosperous world, if elected.

Table 1: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2015-16 Actual results2016-17 Actual results2017-18 Actual results
Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.Percentage of advocacy campaigns which met their stated objectives.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of diplomatic activities which met their stated objectives.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of international commitments through which Canada works with partners to address strategic peace and security challenges.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canada’s leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.Number of influencers reached through Canadian-hosted events, including events on women’s empowerment and rights and gender equality.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of Canadian-led decisions introduced through international and regional organizations that are accepted.100%March 31, 2020100%100%100%
Number of Canadians in leadership positions in international institutions.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.Percentage of organizations of which Canada is a member, which receive a positive performance rating on any independent evaluation.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Degree to which Canadian positions on international legal issues are reflected in the outcome of discussions and negotiations, such as agreements, arrangements and resolutions.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Degree to which actions that are led or supported by Canada support strengthened adherence to international law.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.Ranking of Canada’s global presence as reflected by our participation in the global economy, our military presence and our people-to-people ties.5thMarch 31, 20209th8th8th
Ranking of Canada’s reputation abroad as reported in global opinion polls.1stMarch 31, 20202nd1st7th
Percentage of Canadians who are satisfied with Canada’s international engagement.Obtain Baseline InformationFootnote 1Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Table 2: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019-20 Main Estimates2019-20 Planned spending2020-21 Planned spending2021-22 Planned spending
873,628,607873,628,607873,750,355874,787,007
Table 3: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents2020-21 Planned full-time equivalents2021-22 Planned full-time equivalents
2,3572,3302,329

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote i.

Core Responsibility 2: Trade and Investment

Description

Global Affairs Canada supports increased and more diverse trade and investment to raise the standard of living for all Canadians and to enable Canadian businesses to grow internationally and to create economic opportunities.

Planning highlights

Global Affairs Canada will work to deepen and diversify trade relationships, advocate for a rules-based international trading system focused on economic opportunities for all, and seek increased and diversified foreign direct investment. The department will pursue modern and inclusive approaches with trading partners in important areas such as transparency, labour rights, the environment, small and medium-sized enterprises, gender, and Indigenous peoples.

Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.

Canada-U.S.-Mexico Agreement

With negotiations for the Canada-United-States-Mexico Agreement complete,  Canada will remain engaged with the U.S. and Mexico to strengthen North America’s global competitiveness, to fortify our relationships with these key trading partners, and to advance Canada’s values and political, trade and security interests.

Canada remains committed to advocating for a rules-based open trading system that focuses on economic opportunities for all. New and existing free trade agreements pave the road to a more diversified, modern and inclusive global trading system with benefits to Canadians. Global Affairs Canada will ensure that Canada’s interests are advanced vis-à-vis the global trading system by supporting the expansion of modern and inclusive trade agreements on various multilateral, plurilateral and sectoral levels. This includes the implementation of the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement, the Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement, the modernized Canada-Chile and Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreements, and the newly ratified Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Canada’s inclusive trade interests will also be promoted by efforts to access a more diverse range of markets. Examples of these efforts include: the ratification and implementation of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP); the acceleration of exploratory trade talks with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations; and, the vigorous pursuit of opportunities in fast-growing economies in South Asia, where Canada’s trade has been expanding rapidly in recent years. Canada is also engaged in negotiations toward comprehensive free trade agreements with Mercosur and the Pacific Alliance.

Global Affairs Canada will also continue to advance inclusive approaches to trade, including those that support women and women-owned businesses, Indigenous peoples, small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), newcomers and LGBTQ2 and intersex persons. Through engagement with partners and international organizations in various forums, such as the G7, the G20, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the World Trade Organization (including Canada’s initiative to reform and strengthen the organization), Canada’s interests and priorities will be advanced on the world stage.

Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.

Global Affairs Canada recognizes the importance of international commercial activities as a driver for economic prosperity and will work with our partners to ensure that our global engagements are maximizing relationship and partnership opportunities for Canadian businesses and workers.

Women and trade

By providing $10 million over five years to expand the Business Women in International Trade program, Global Affairs Canada will help connect women entrepreneurs with export opportunities through women-focused international trade missions, tailored advisory services, and access to global value chains.

With the goal of increasing Canada’s overseas exports by 50% by 2025, Global Affairs Canada will pursue an export diversification strategy to provide more support for companies to explore new markets and enhanced trade services to exporters. The department will work with partners to diversify Canadian exporters and trade partners for the benefit of the middle class and increase exports with key global markets, with a particular focus on the Asia-Pacific region.

The strategy will also better serve all businesses looking to do business abroad through an expansion of the Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) presence and services in key markets abroad and throughout the TCS regional network across Canada, as well as modernization of TCS tools, including a refreshed digital presence, new online tools for exporters, enhanced market intelligence, and tools to facilitate seamless client referrals between other federal and provincial partners.

Additionally, Global Affairs Canada will work with Employment and Social Development Canada to develop a new international education strategy in order to attract more international students and provide training in support of Canada’s international trade and increased global ties.

Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to work with Invest in Canada to increase foreign direct investment, in order to make investing in Canada simpler and more attractive, and to reinforce a positive profile of Canada’s openness to international commerce. The department will also seek to make Canada a top destination for global investment and to attract more foreign direct investment through the implementation of free trade agreements.

Table 4: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2015-16 Actual results2016-17 Actual results2017-18 Actual results
Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.Degree to which Canada opens markets and advances trade policy innovations through negotiations, agreements and discussions.4
(on a 1-5 scale)
March 31, 2020Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Degree to which Canada works to resolve or mitigate market access barriers, disputes or other strategic policy issues.4
(on a 1-5 scale)
March 31, 2020Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Percentage of applications for permits and certificates related to trade controls processed in accordance with service standards.90%Footnote 2March 31, 202097%97.5%96.9%
Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.Percentage of clients indicating satisfaction with the quality of services delivered by the Trade Commissioner Service.85%Footnote 3March 31, 202085%89.5%91.6%
Number of active business clients of the Trade Commissioner Service.16,000Footnote 4March 31, 202014,46514,50914,437
Number of concluded commercial agreements facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.1,000March 31, 20209631,0081,019
Number of international research and innovation partnerships facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.150Footnote 5March 31, 2020203260125
Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.Number of new foreign investments and expansions of existing foreign investments in Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.110March 31, 2020109101138
Number of investor visits to Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.100Footnote 6March 31, 2020170153184
Table 5: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019-20 Main Estimates2019-20 Planned spending2020-21 Planned spending2021-22 Planned spending
327,140,604327,140,604298,318,785294,745,487Footnote 7
Table 6: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019-20 Planned full-time equivalents2020-21 Planned full-time equivalents2021-22 Planned full-time equivalents
1,9511,9531,936

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote ii.

Core Responsibility 3: Development, Peace and Security Programming

Description

Global Affairs Canada programming contributes to reducing poverty, increasing opportunity for people around the world, alleviating suffering in humanitarian crises, and fostering peace and security, and in so doing, advances the Sustainable Development Goals.

Planning highlights

Global Affairs Canada is committed to successfully implementing Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy — a transformative approach to international assistance that recognizes that advancing gender equality and empowering women and girls in a targeted and cross-cutting manner is the most effective approach to make progress towards eradicating poverty, and building a more peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world. Canada’s approach contributes to achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. This policy outlines six interlinked action areas for Canada’s international assistance: gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; human dignity; growth that works for everyone; environment and climate action; inclusive governance; and peace and security. Across these action areas, Canada will continue to make progress towards ensuring that 95 percent of its bilateral international development assistance advances gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls by 2021-22. Canada will work towards directing 50 percent of its bilateral international development assistance to Sub-Saharan African countries by 2021–22.

Innovation for a peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world

The Government of Canada will provide $2 billion in new resources over five years to advance the Feminist International Policy through programming that contributes to eradicating poverty and building a more peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world. It will also allocate $1.5 billion over five years in support of innovation in Canada’s international assistance through the International Assistance Innovation program and the Sovereign Loans program.

In June 2019, Canada will host the next Women Deliver Global Conference in Vancouver, which will bring over 6,000 world leaders, influencers, advocates, academics, activists, and journalists from more than 150 countries to Canada to strengthen global advocacy partnerships and tools, in particular for young people, to influence policy, programs, processes and decisions that impact gender equality and girls’ and women’s health, rights and wellbeing, including sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.

When women are able to develop their full economic potential—whether as agricultural producers, employees, entrepreneurs or business leaders—economies thrive and the benefits of growth reach more people. Businesses also benefit when they integrate women and woman-owned enterprises into their supply chains.

Canada recognizes the importance of the full participation of women in economic decision making and is committed to helping improve opportunities for women. This includes assistance for rural women in the area of climate-smart agriculture and support for initiatives that deliver technical and vocational training and encourage women’s entrepreneurship. In addition, Canada will work to support greater financial inclusion, better access to good, well-paying work, and enhanced labour and property rights for women. Canada is also prepared to help local governments develop the policy reforms needed to address issues such as unpaid work and care.

Global Affairs Canada will ensure that the benefits of trade are shared more broadly, which includes closing the gap in women’s participation in trade and the economy. In line with this commitment, Global Affairs Canada will continue to foster economic development and growth by seeking fair trade opportunities for women-owned/operated small and medium-sized enterprises, supporting women exporters, and advancing trade agreements that incorporate a gender perspective to help increase women’s access to economic opportunities and resources. 

To eradicate poverty, all girls, adolescent girls and women must have equal access to quality education and learning opportunities. When women and girls have an equal chance to learn, grow, and succeed, they help build an economy that works for everyone. Canada will continue to strengthen its legacy as a leader in this area, including through targeted investments supporting our G7 commitment to provide $400 million to support Education for Women and Girls in Fragile, Conflict and Crisis Situations.   

Global Affairs Canada will also support multilateral and global health initiatives aimed at improved nutrition as well as infectious disease control for the poorest and most vulnerable in countries where Canada engages. By improving access to nutritious foods and supplements, Canada will help combat anemia and improve birth outcomes. With a focus on equity-based approaches to fighting infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and polio, as well as increased access to new and underused vaccines, Canada will help save the lives of children living in the world’s poorest countries.

Global Affairs Canada will also continue engagement in multi-stakeholder partnerships with organizations that focus on climate smart and environmentally sustainable development. Through the Government of Canada’s $2.65 billion commitment to climate financing to help the most vulnerable countries, through both adaptation and mitigation support, and also through leveraging private sector investment in climate action investments that support developing countries. The Paris Agreement priorities will be advanced while concurrently promoting accountability, transparency, results, gender equality and women’s empowerment, and innovation.

Under Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy, Global Affairs Canada will focus on empowering women, and offer ways to ensure that growth reaches the poorest and the most marginalized. Priority will be given to initiatives with the greatest potential to reduce chronic poverty and gender inequalities, and that promote sustainable growth, economic inclusion and resilience. The department will be looking for inclusive innovative partnerships and finance that will help drive innovation, trade and investment in developing countries, particularly in fragile and conflict-affected environments.

Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.

Canada is committed to eradicating poverty, and building a more peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world. Global Affairs Canada will invest in gender equality and women’s empowerment as the most effective means of achieving these objectives, grounded in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 

To respond to the needs of local women’s organizations that advance women’s rights in developing countries, Global Affairs Canada will address a significant funding gap experienced by women’s organizations and network by providing them with direct funding and institutional support so that they can promote women’s rights and advance women’s empowerment and gender equality. Canada will be engaging with organizations in 30 countries and regions to help advance gender equality and empower women and girls.

Investing in family planning

$15 million will be provided to Marie Stopes Tanzania to provide women and girls with improved access to the information and family-planning services and commodities they require.

Global Affairs Canada will host the next Global Action on Disability Network meeting in Ottawa from April 29 to May 1, 2019, where discussions will be held on the progress of international cooperation in disability-inclusive development & humanitarian action. This meeting presents an opportunity to further develop shared commitment to disability inclusive development and humanitarian action.

An important step to achieving positive health outcomes for women and girls is closing persistent gaps in sexual and reproductive health and rights. Global Affairs Canada will focus on effective leadership and the coordination of efforts to fulfill the maternal, newborn and child health, and sexual and reproductive rights commitments with international partners.

Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.

Canada is recognized as a leader in providing humanitarian assistance to those affected by conflicts and by natural disasters and will continue to support timely humanitarian action with an improved gender-responsive approach, based on humanitarian principles and on needs, to save lives, alleviate suffering and support the dignity of those affected. This includes providing flexible and predictable funding in response to humanitarian crises, in accordance with World Humanitarian Summit and Grand Bargain commitments, including the use of un-earmarked and multi-year funding for longer-term crises, as well as increasing localization to build the capacity of and increase funding to local and national actors in the delivery of humanitarian assistance.

Global Affairs Canada will provide humanitarian assistance to populations affected by natural disasters and human-made conflicts in developing countries and in fragile and conflict-affected states. The department will focus on improving capacity to address the humanitarian and early recovery needs of crisis-affected populations and on improving gender-responsive support provided to crisis-affected populations, including those forcibly displaced.

Due to the specific risks that humanitarian crises create for women and girls, Canada also committed to increasing its support for women and girls in its humanitarian response efforts and for local groups providing emergency assistance, including local women’s organizations.

Women and girls have the potential to be powerful agents of change for development and peace in crisis situations and are already leading many response efforts. They are often uniquely positioned to take on leadership roles, determine priorities and influence more effective humanitarian responses; thereby directly contributing to improving their own lives and those of their families, communities and countries.

Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.

Women, peace and security

Global Affairs Canada recognizes that violent conflict affects women, girls, men and boys in different ways and that it is important that these consequences are recognized and addressed. Canada’s National Action Plan (2017-22) on Women, Peace and Security provides a framework for a cohesive whole-of-government approach and ensures that government activities in fragile and conflict-affected states align with broader commitments, such as:

  • gender equality
  • empowerment of women and girls
  • respect for women’s and girls’ human rights
  • inclusion and respect for diversity

Through Canada’s Peace and Stabilization Operations Program, and applying a feminist approach, Canada is buttressing efforts to achieve peace in fragile and conflict-affected states, including through deploying civilian experts and police. The department will continue to provide policy leadership on peace and stabilization; and will continue to deliver conflict prevention, stabilization, and peacebuilding initiatives. The department will support inclusive approaches to building sustainable peace and security by helping women to participate in peacebuilding processes as well as in preventing and resolving conflicts and political crises, and by ensuring that responses account for and meet the needs of women and girls. 

Global Affairs Canada will engage with partner states, organizations, and global networks in the prevention and mitigation of terrorism, violent radicalization and transnational organized crime. The department will continue to engage with the international donor community to more effectively co-ordinate capacity-building programming, thereby reducing the potential for duplication and strengthening the impact of programming. Human rights and gender-informed programming to combat violent extremism and transnational crime are critical for more effective and sustainable outcomes. The department will also enhance engagement with the United Nations and other multilateral organizations to support peacebuilding and peacekeeping operations and to continue to advance the Women, Peace and Security agenda. Global Affairs Canada will continue to take a leadership role supporting, among other initiatives, the Vancouver Principles—focused on ending the recruitment and use of child soldiers in the context of UN peacekeeping operations—and the Elsie Initiative for Women in Peace Operations, a pilot project that aims to increase the meaningful participation of uniformed women in UN peace operations.

The department will work to enhance a rules-based international order for non-proliferation, arms control and disarmament to address threats posed by weapons of mass destruction. This includes strengthening the foundations of international arms control and disarmament, notably the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The department will continue to engage partners to support priorities such as: biological threats and the interface between health and security; the attribution mechanism for the use of chemical weapons, particularly in Syria; the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization; and efforts to address proliferation concerns arising from Iran and North Korea.

Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.

The Partnership for Gender Equality

The Partnership for Gender Equality is a call to action by the Government of Canada to philanthropy, the private sector and civil society to mobilize unprecedented levels of resources for women’s organizations and movements globally.

Canada’s advances in development innovation and effectiveness will continue through further development and implementation of policies, programs, and partnerships that promote innovation and appropriate risk-taking.  The department will encourage partners to integrate and report on experimentation in their projects, and will also implement the Small and Medium Organizations for Impact and Innovation initiative that will support the testing of innovations in international development.

Global Affairs Canada is an important influencer and actor for peace and sustainable development at home and abroad, and will continue to prioritize partnerships, strategic engagement and policy dialogue with Canadian civil-society organizations and other Canadian stakeholders. Another initiative demonstrating our commitment to work with partners in new ways is the establishment of the Task Force on Improving Effectiveness, which was created to enhance the department’s engagement with partners.  It is an innovative way to work collaboratively to identify solutions to challenges facing the department’s partners and staff as part of wider process-transformation efforts to reduce the administrative burden on partners and staff and to improve effectiveness.

Canada will continue to advance new approaches to financing for development. Canada will co-facilitate the 7th High Level Dialogue on Financing for Development in New York on September 26th, 2019. Canada will work closely with co-chair Ghana and all Member States to ensure the dialogue provides innovative, inclusive, and practical solutions to financing the Sustainable Development Goals so that no one is left behind. Canada will implement the Budget 2018 commitment of $1.59 billion over 5 years for the development of new tools to leverage and align more private and public financing towards advancing the Feminist International Assistance Policy and achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. Through these initiatives, Canada will continue to show leadership within the G7 on gender equality and implementing the Charlevoix Commitment on Innovative Financing for Development.

Table 7: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2015–16 Actual results2016–17 Actual results2017–18 Actual results
Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.Number of graduates (m/f) of GAC supported, demand driven, technical and vocational education and training.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Number of people (m/f) receiving micronutrient supplementation, including iron and folic acid, through GAC programming.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Number of entrepreneurs, farmers and smallholders (m/f) provided with financial and/or business development services through GAC-funded projects.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Number of civil-society organizations supported through GAC funding who advocate for human rights and/or inclusive governance.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Number of beneficiaries (m/f) from climate adaptation projects supported by GAC.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.
 
Percentage of countries that show a decrease in the adolescent fertility rate (number of births/1000 women).Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of women’s organizations and women’s networks advancing women's rights and gender equality that receive GAC support for programming and/or institutional strengthening.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.Number of beneficiaries that receive emergency food and nutrition assistance in relation to need and in consideration of international responseFootnote 9.Not applicable79.1M
(in 2015)
83.1M
(in 2016)
91.4M
(in 2017)
Number of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDP) assisted and protected.12Not applicableRefugees assisted:  12,282,792
IDPs protected/ assisted:  48,906,889
(in 2015)
Refugees assisted:  12,903,863
IDPs protected/ assisted:  48,019,097
(in 2016)
Refugees assisted:  11,900,000
IDPs protected/ assisted:  39,100,000
(in 2017)
Number of women and girls who have received sexual and reproductive health services through a GAC-funded humanitarian response delivered by Civil Society Organizations.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.Percentage of international assistance that targets fragile and conflict-affected states.50%March 31, 202045.90%49.29%61%
Number of Canadian supported direct interventions taken by partners to prevent, detect and/or respond to crime, terrorism, and the proliferation of weapons, including weapons of mass destruction and related materials.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of subject matter experts, including in sexual and gender-based violence, supported through GAC funding to participate in international efforts to investigate and prosecute crimes under international lawObtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2019-20
Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.Number of new partners that receive GAC support for programming in the delivery of international assistance, disaggregated by type and size.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Number of projects employing innovative approaches in the delivery of international assistance.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 8Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Table 8: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
3,920,924,2603,920,924,2603,934,016,2683,861,703,859Footnote 10

 

Table 9: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20  Planned full-time equivalents2020–21  Planned full-time equivalents2021–22  Planned full-time equivalents
1,0881,0841,081

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote iii.

Core Responsibility 4: Help for Canadians Abroad

Description

Global Affairs Canada provides timely and appropriate consular services for Canadians abroad, contributing to their safety and security.

Planning highlights

Global Affairs Canada provides consular services to support Canadians who travel the world; who work, volunteer, or retire abroad; or who participate in international student exchanges. The department is committed to achieving excellence in service delivery to ensure that Canadians are provided with timely and appropriate consular and emergency management services.

Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.

Timely information is critical to ensuring that Canadians receive the best possible consular assistance, especially when they are faced with an unexpected situation abroad. The department will enhance its external communications outreach and will continue to inform Canadians through regular updates of the department’s travel advice and advisories, as well as timely response updates during crises and significant events, available on travel.gc.ca.

Global Affairs Canada will also continue to provide high-quality, uninterrupted emergency consular assistance to Canadians faced with unexpected situations abroad. Our highly trained and capable team of core responders is ready to assist Canadians 24/7 through our Emergency Watch and Response Centre.

Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services.

Updated Service Standards

The department is committed to providing a high standard of consular assistance and the service standards will be updated to reflect the core consular services provided to Canadians abroad.

Global Affairs Canada continues to improve the delivery of consular services to Canadians abroad in exceptional circumstances as well as through timely and appropriate government services, such as notarial, passport and citizenship services, needed by the majority of consular clients abroad.

Honorary Consul Network

To better serve Canadians abroad, the Honorary Consul network will be expanded with the creation of new offices in locations where there is no Canadian diplomatic mission.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to implement a series of initiatives to address recommendations from the Office of the Auditor General (Report 7—Consular Services to Canadians Abroad—Global Affairs Canada) and the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development study on the provision of consular services (Strengthening the Canadian consular service today and for the future). In response to recommendations from the Auditor General’s Report on Services to Canadians Abroad, Global Affairs Canada will review and update its consular service standards. The updated standards will reflect consultations conducted with consular officers, like-minded states and civil-society organizations and will focus on the most important areas of consular services. In accordance with Treasury Board guidelines, the new standards will be designed to be clear, achievable and measurable.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to consult with partners and stakeholders to address challenges that may impact consular services and will continue to strengthen the training program for consular officers and the tools available for them to advance their work.

Table 10: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2015–16  Actual results2016–17 Actual  results2017–18 Actual  results
Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.Number of Canadians who use the department’s travel outreach products, including digital initiativesFootnote 11.Annual visits to travel.gc.ca:
5% increase
March 31, 202012.62% increase
(13,076,815 visits)
9.58% increase
(14,329,347 visits)
12.00% increase
(16,048,226 visits)
Total installations of Travel Smart App annually:
15% increase
N/A53,40283,741
Social media followers:
5% increase
200,425295,053317,645
Percentage of consular cases actioned within 24 hours of being reported to consular officialsFootnote 12.90%March 31, 202093%95%97%
Number of Canadians who have been assisted through the 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre.Not applicable61,60751,15745,875
Timely response to international emergencies.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 13Not available
New indicator as of 2018-19
Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services.Percentage of Canadian clients who expressed satisfaction with the service(s) received.90%March 31, 202094%92%91%
Percentage of services that met the established service standards.Passports: 90%
Citizenship: 85% 
March 31, 2020Passports: 93%
Citizenship
86%
Passports:91%
Citizenship
90%
Passports: 86%
Citizenship
88%

 

Table 11: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
50,998,30850,998,30850,763,33951,206,860

 

Table 12: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20  Planned full-time equivalents2020–21  Planned full-time equivalents2021–22  Planned full-time equivalents
411414407

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote iv.

Core Responsibility 5: Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad

Description

Global Affairs Canada manages and delivers resources, infrastructure and services enabling Canada’s presence abroad, including at embassies, high commissions, and consulates.

Planning highlights

Global Affairs Canada manages a global network of 178 missions, including embassies, high commissions and consulates in 110 countries to deliver services to Canadians abroad, provide support to Canadian businesses in reaching global markets, promote Canada’s interests and values internationally, and help improve the lives of the poorest and most vulnerable. The department provides common services and will continue efforts to strengthen them, and will deliver increased investments in support of security at missions, such as infrastructure and training.

Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.

The department will continue efforts to strengthen multi-year, whole-of-platform business and investment planning to ensure the long-term sustainability of Canada’s network of missions abroad. This includes developing integrated five-year mission plans and 20-year investment strategies for each mission, as well as implementing a new costing methodology for common services. The department will also optimize the management and delivery of common services by developing and leveraging enhanced business analytics systems and tools; conducting a comprehensive review of the supply chain operations framework; and implementing a real property project management centre of expertise.

Global Affairs Canada will support its workforce at home and abroad by modernizing departmental mobility and collaboration capabilities and updating its information technology infrastructure. It will work with Shared Services Canada to provide secure smartphone technology, increase bandwidth and deploy Wi-Fi access to missions.

Environmental Sustainability Pilot Projects

The department will undertake two real property pilot projects related to environmental sustainability: a BOMA Green Pilot in Beijing and a Net Zero Carbon pilot in Geneva.

Global Affairs Canada will also continue to enhance services for Government of Canada employees at missions. This includes supporting Canada-based staff and their dependents with targeted outreach and modernized business processes, and enhancing the delivery of the newly negotiated Foreign Service Directive payments, and services.

Global Affairs Canada will also enhance engagement with locally engaged staff, including through a locally engaged staff symposium event and other communications efforts. The department will continue to work with key partners in the Public Service Commission and Treasury Board Secretariat on reforms related to employment/terms and conditions, classification and the pension, insurance and social security program for locally engaged staff.

Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.

A key priority for Global Affairs Canada is to ensure the safety and security of Canada-based staff and their dependents, as well as local staff and visitors to missions around the world. The security environment in which missions operate is evolving and dynamic due to unpredictable political situations, hostile actions and/or civil unrest, and natural disasters.

Enhancing Security Culture

Applying expertise in behavioural science, the department will test new approaches to increasing security awareness and promoting appropriate security behaviour.

Significant funding is being invested to strengthen security measures at embassies, high commissions and consulates, including through improved security services, infrastructure upgrades, emergency readiness, and training programs. A number of strategies to improve the health and safety of personnel and assets abroad will continue to be implemented, including seismic studies for chanceries, official residences and Crown-owned staff quarters; a potable water quality program; an indoor air quality program; an asbestos management strategy; and an environmental site investigation program. Mandatory training for staff being posted abroad, especially to designated high and critical threat missions, is a key element of Global Affairs Canada pre-posting practices and will be reinforced. The department will also reassess the current mandatory security training for locally engaged staff and will expand training, as required, to ensure that it continues to be appropriate to the threat environment.

Table 13: Planned results
Departmental ResultsDepartmental Result IndicatorsTargetDate to achieve target2015–16  Actual results2016–17 Actual  results2017–18 Actual  results
Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.Percentage of partner organizations, indicating the resources, infrastructure, and services provided abroad met their needs.Obtain baseline informationFootnote 14Not availableNew indicator as of 2018–19
Percentage of the replacement value of the department’s real property portfolio spent on repairs, maintenance, and recapitalization.2%March 31, 20201%1%1%
Percentage of Crown-owned properties abroad that were rated in good and fair condition based on the condition categories in the Directory of Federal Real Property.85%March 31, 202089.6%87.05%88.1%
Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.Number of security risk mitigation measures that address the priority risks identified in the Departmental Security Plan that are implemented.20March 31, 2020192017

 

Table 14: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
1,031,850,5771,031,850,577996,218,816983,427,418Footnote 15

 

Table 15: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20  Planned full-time equivalents2020–21  Planned full-time equivalents2021–22  Planned full-time equivalents
4,4744,4914,490

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote v.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

Table 16: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
245,601,336245,601,336240,954,153238,357,202

 

Table 17: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20  Planned full-time equivalents2020–21  Planned full-time equivalents2021–22  Planned full-time equivalents
1,6581,6551,652

Spending and human resources

Planned spending

Text version
Departmental Spending Trend Graph ($ Millions)
 2016-172017-182018-192019-202020-212021-22
Statutory413.8402.2400.4333.6332.7334.0
Voted5,846.36,172.16,636.86,116.66,061.35,970.3
Total6,260.06,574.37,037.16,450.16,394.06,304.2

From 2018–19 to 2021–22, Global Affairs Canada’s spending profile varies from $7.0 billion in 2018–19 to $6.3 billion in 2021–22. Significant items contributing to the decrease of $700 million include the following:

Decreases are also attributable to operating and capital carry forward amounts ($113.3 million), which are included in 2018–19 but not future year figures. These decreases are offset by an increase of $266.8 million to support the Feminist International Assistance Policy. Expenditures for 2016–17 and 2017–18 reflect the financial information previously reported in the Departmental Results Reports and the Public Accounts.

Table 18: Budgetary planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services2016–17  Expenditures2017–18
Expenditures
2018–19
Forecast spending
2019–20
Main Estimates
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2021–22
Planned spending
International Advocacy and Diplomacy423,953,915717,225,172968,863,782873,628,607873,628,607873,750,355874,787,007
Trade and Investment202,259,561212,690,702334,186,468327,140,604327,140,604298,318,785294,745,487
Development, Peace and Security Programming4,419,857,3854,365,905,1774,338,980,8043,920,924,2603,920,924,2603,934,016,2683,861,703,859
Help for Canadians Abroad48,746,98247,169,19545,998,39850,998,30850,998,30850,763,33951,206,860
Support for Canada's Presence Abroad931,402,810968,738,5081,078,239,3411,031,850,5771,031,850,577996,218,816983,427,418
Subtotal6,026,220,6536,311,728,7546,766,268,7936,204,542,3566,204,542,3566,153,067,5636,065,870,631
Internal Services233,804,154262,558,260270,850,844245,601,336245,601,336240,954,153238,357,202
Total6,260,024,8076,574,287,0147,037,119,6376,450,143,6926,450,143,6926,394,021,7166,304,227,833

Planned human resources

Table 19: Human resources planning summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalentsFootnote 16)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services2016–17
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Forecast full-time equivalents
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents2021–22 Planned full‑time equivalents
International Advocacy and Diplomacy2,2082,4212,4422,3572,3302,329
Trade and Investment1,7251,8511,8671,9511,9531,936
Development, Peace and Security Programming1,0079829921,0881,0841,081
Help for Canadians Abroad335364367411414407
Support for Canada's Presence Abroad4,3774,3074,3454,4744,4914,490
Subtotal9,6529,92510,01310,28110,27210,243
Internal Services1,3511,3631,5131,6581,6551,652
Total11,00311,28811,52611,93911,92711,895

From 2016–17 to 2021–22, Global Affairs Canada’s full-time equivalents (FTEs) increased by 892 FTEs (8%) to deliver new programs and initiatives in support of the department's mandate and priorities. The year-over-year variance in the number of FTEs is attributable to the following:

Estimates by vote

Information on the Global Affairs Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2019–20 Main EstimatesFootnote vi.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations

The Future‑Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of Global Affairs Canada’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future‑Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future‑Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the Global Affairs Canada’s websiteFootnote 17.

Table 20: Future‑Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
for the year ending March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information2018–19
Forecast results
2019–20
Planned results
Difference
(2019–20 Planned results minus 2018–19 Forecast results)
Total expenses6,573,203,7075,826,394,647(746,809,060)
Total revenues40,468,27340,884,468416,195
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers6,532,735,4345,785,510,179(747,225,255)

The decrease of $746.8 million in 2019–20 Planned Expenses, when compared to the 2018–19 Forecasted Expenses, is mainly attributable to:

Additional information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate ministers: Chrystia Freeland, Minister of Foreign Affairs; James Gordon Carr, Minister of International Trade Diversification; Maryam Monsef, Minister of International Development and Minister for Women and Gender Equality; Mélanie Joly, Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie.

Institutional heads: Ian Shugart, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs; John Hannaford, Deputy Minister for International Trade; Diane Jacovella, Deputy Minister of International Development; Guylaine Roy, Deputy Minister of Tourism, Official Languages and La Francophonie.

Ministerial portfolio: Global Affairs Canada and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service. The following federal entities operate at arm’s length and report to Parliament through the Global Affairs Canada ministers: the Canadian Commercial Corporation, Export Development Canada, the International Development Research Centre, and Invest in Canada.

Enabling instrument: Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act, S.C. 2013, c. 33, s. 174Footnote vii

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1909

Raison d’être, mandate and role: Who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Global Affairs Canada’s website.

Reporting framework

Global Affairs Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below:

Table 21
Departmental Results FrameworkProgram Inventory
Core Responsibility 1:
International Advocacy and Diplomacy
Departmental Result:
Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.
Indicator: Percentage of advocacy campaigns which met their stated objectives.International Policy
Multilateral Policy
Indicator: Percentage of diplomatic activities which met their stated objectives.
International Law
Indicator: Number of international commitments through which Canada works with partners to address strategic peace and security challenges.The Office of  Protocol
Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb
Americas Policy and Diplomacy
Departmental Result:
Canada’s leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.
Indicator: Number of influencers reached through Canadian-hosted events, including events on women’s empowerment and rights and gender equality.Asia Pacific Policy and Diplomacy
Sub-Saharan Africa Policy and Diplomacy
Geographic Coordination Mission Support
Indicator: Percentage of Canadian-led decisions introduced through international and regional organizations that are accepted.Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women and Girls
Humanitarian Action
Indicator: Number of Canadians in leadership positions in international institutions.Human Development: Health and Education
Growth that Works for Everyone
Departmental Result:
Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.
Indicator: Percentage of organizations of which Canada is a member, which receive a positive performance rating on any independent evaluation.Environment and Climate Action 
Inclusive Governance
Peace and Security Policy
Indicator: Degree to which Canadian position on international legal issues are reflected in the outcome of discussions and negotiations, such as agreements and resolutions.
International Security Policy and Diplomacy
 
Indicator: Degree to which actions that are led or supported by Canada support strengthened adherence to international law.
Departmental Result:
Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.
Indicator: Ranking of Canada’s global presence as reflected by our participation in the global economy, our military presence and our people-to-people ties.
Indicator: Ranking of Canada’s reputation abroad as reported in global opinion polls.
Indicator: Percentage of Canadians who are satisfied with Canada’s international engagement.
Core Responsibility 2: Trade and InvestmentDepartmental Result:
Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.
Indicator: Degree to which Canada opens markets and advances trade policy innovations through negotiations, agreements and discussions.Trade Policy, Agreements Negotiations, and Dispute
Trade Controls
Indicator: Degree to which Canada works to resolve or mitigate market access barriers, disputes or other strategic policy issuesInternational Business Development
International Innovation and Investment
Indicator: Percentage of applications for permits and certificates related to trade controls processed in accordance with service standards.Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb Trade
Americas Trade
Asia Pacific Trade
Departmental Result:
Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.
Indicator: Percentage of clients indicating satisfaction with the quality of services delivered by the Trade Commissioner Service.Sub-Saharan Africa Trade
 
Indicator: Number of active business clients of the Trade Commissioner Service.
Indicator: Number of concluded commercial agreements facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Indicator: Number of international research and innovation partnerships facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Departmental Result:
Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.
Indicator: Number of new foreign investments and expansions of existing foreign investments in Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service. 
Indicator: Number of investor visits to Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Core Responsibility 3:
Development, Peace and Security Programming
Departmental Result:
Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.
Indicator: Number of graduates (m/f) of GAC supported, demand driven, technical and vocational education and training.International Assistance Operations
Humanitarian Assistance
Partnership and Development Innovation
Indicator: Number of people (m/f) receiving micronutrient supplementation, including iron and folic acid, through GAC programming.Multilateral International Assistance
Peace and Stabilization Operations
Anti-Crime and Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building
Indicator: Number of entrepreneurs, farmers and smallholders (m/f) provided with financial and/or business development services through GAC-funded projects.Weapons Threat Reduction
Canada Fund for Local Initiatives
Europe, Arctic, Middle East and Maghreb International Assistance
Indicator: Number of civil-society organizations supported through GAC funding who advocate for human rights and/or inclusive governance.Americas International Assistance
Indicator: Number of beneficiaries (m/f) from climate adaptation projects supported by GAC.Asia Pacific International Assistance
Departmental Result:
Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.
Indicator: Percentage of countries that show a decrease in the adolescent fertility rate (number of births/1000 women).Sub-Saharan Africa International Assistance 
Grants and Contributions Policy and Operations
Indicator: Number of women’s organizations and women’s networks advancing women's rights and gender equality that receive GAC support for programming and/or institutional strengthening. 
Departmental Result:
Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.
Indicator: Number of beneficiaries that receive emergency food and nutrition assistance in relation to need and in consideration of international response.
Indicator: Number of refugees and internally displaced persons assisted and protected.
Indicator:  Number of women and girls who have received sexual and reproductive health services through a GAC-funded humanitarian response delivered by Civil Society Organizations.
Departmental Result:
Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.
Indicator: Percentage of international assistance that targets fragile and conflict-affected states.
Indicator: Number of Canadian supported direct interventions taken by partners to prevent, detect and/or respond to crime, terrorism, and the proliferation of weapons, including weapons of mass destruction and related material.
Indicator: Number of subject matter experts, including in sexual and gender-based violence, supported through GAC funding to participate in international efforts to investigate and prosecute crimes under international law.
Departmental Result:
Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.
Indicator: Number of new partners that receive GAC support for programming in the delivery of international assistance, disaggregated by type and size.
Indicator: Number of projects employing innovative approaches in the delivery of international assistance.
Core Responsibility 4:
Help for Canadians abroad
Departmental Result:
Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.
Indicator: Number of Canadians who use the department’s travel outreach products, including digital initiatives.Consular Assistance and Administrative Services for Canadians Abroad
Indicator: Percentage of consular cases actioned within 24 hours of being reported to consular officials.Emergency Preparedness and Response
Indicator: Number of Canadians who have been assisted through the 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre.
Indicator: Timely response to international emergencies.
Departmental Result:
Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services.
Indicator: Percentage of Canadian clients who expressed satisfaction with the service(s) received.
Indicator: Percentage of services that met the established service standards.
Core Responsibility 5:
Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad
Departmental Result:
Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure, and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.
Indicator: Percentage of partner organizations, indicating the resources, infrastructure, and services provided abroad met their needs.Platform Corporate Services
Foreign Service Directives
Client Relations and Mission Operations
Indicator: Percentage of the replacement value of the department’s real property portfolio spent on repairs, maintenance, and recapitalization.Locally Engaged Staff Services
Real Property Planning and Stewardship
Real Property Project Delivery, Professional and Technical
Indicator: Percentage of Crown-owned properties abroad that were rated in good and fair condition based on the condition categories in the Directory of Federal Real Property.
Mission Readiness and Security
Mission Network Information Management / Information Technology
 
 
Departmental Result:
Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.
Indicator: Number of security risk mitigation measures that address the priority risks identified in the Departmental Security Plan that are implemented.

 

Table 22
Program Inventory
Internal ServicesManagement & Oversight
Communications
Legal Services
Human Resources
Financial Management
Information Management
Information Technology
Real Property (Domestic)
Materiel Management
Acquisition Management

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Global Affairs Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBaseFootnote viii.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Global Affairs Canada’s websiteFootnote ix:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax ExpendituresFootnote x. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Global Affairs Canada
Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
TTY: 1-800-394-3472 (toll-free from the U.S. and Canada only); 613-944-1310 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709
www.international.gc.ca

Enquiries Services
Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0G2
Email: enqserv@international.gc.ca
Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709

Other Portfolio Related Contacts

Canadian Commercial Corporation
350 Albert Street, 7th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 0S6
Tel.: 1-800-748-8191 (toll-free in Canada);
613-996-0034 (National Capital Region and outside Canada) 
Fax: 613-995-2121
www.ccc.ca 

International Joint Commission (Canadian Section)
234 Laurier Avenue West, 22nd Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 6K6
Tel.: 613-995-2984
Fax: 613-993-5583
www.ijc.org

Export Development Canada
150 Slater Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 1K3
Tel.: 1-800-229-0575 (toll-free in North America);
613-598-2500 (local)
TTY: 1-866-574-0451
Fax: 613-598-3811
www.edc.ca

Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission
459 Route 774
Welshpool, NB E5E 1A4
Tel.: 1-877-851-6663 (toll-free)
506-752-2922 (local)
Fax: 506-752-6000
www.fdr.net

International Development Research Centre
150 Kent Street
Ottawa, ON K1P 0B2
Postal address: P.O. Box 8500
Ottawa, ON K1G 3H9
Tel.: 613-236-6163
Fax: 613-238-7230
www.idrc.ca

Invest in Canada
www.investcanada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
Any change that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by Program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
The department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people. The “plus” acknowledges that GBA goes beyond sex and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government;  A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, Program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
Performance Information Profile (profil de l’information sur le rendement)
The document that identifies the performance information for each Program from the Program Inventory.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Departmental Results.
Program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
Program Inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s Core Responsibilities and Results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, Program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, Program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, Program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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