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A Guide to Canada's Export Controls (continued)

PDF Version (3.43 MB)

December 2020 version

Page 2 of 2 - Group 3 to 7 and Index

Group 3 – Nuclear Non-Proliferation List

(All destinations. All destinations applies to all Group 3 Items.)

Note:
Terms in ‘single quotations’ are usually defined within each entry of the list.

Terms in “double quotations” are defined at the end of Group 4.

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Note:
The export of nuclear and nuclear-related items is also controlled by the CNSC under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and Regulations. Therefore, the export of nuclear and nuclear-related items, not listed in Group 3 or which meet the specific Group 3 decontrol notes may still require a license from the CNSC. Information on export licensing requirements under the NSCA may be obtained by contacting the CNSC.

Nuclear Technology Note:
The “technology” directly associated with any items controlled in Group 3 is controlled according to the provisions of Group 3.

“Technology” for the “development”, “production” or “use” of items under control remains under control even when applicable to non-controlled items.

The approval of items for export also authorizes the export to the same end-user of the minimum “technology” required for the installation, operation, maintenance and repair of the items.

Controls on “technology” transfer do not apply to information “in the public domain” or to “basic scientific research”.

General Software Note:
Group 3 does not control “software” which is either:

3-1. Source and Special Fissionable Materials

3-1.1. Source materials

Source materials in the form of metal, alloy, chemical compound, concentrate, or that are incorporated in any material or substance and in which the concentration of source material is greater than 0.05 weight %, as follows:

Note:
3-1.1. does not control the following:

3-1.2. Special fissionable materials

Note:
3-1.2. does not control the following:

Technical Note:
‘Effective gram’ means:

3-2. Equipment and Non-Nuclear Materials

3-2.1. Nuclear reactors and especially designed or prepared equipment and components therefor, including:

Introductory Note:
Various types of nuclear reactors may be characterized by the moderator used (e.g., graphite, heavy water, light water, none), the spectrum of neutrons therein (e.g., thermal, fast), the type of coolant used (e.g., water, liquid metal, molten salt, gas), or by their function or type (e.g., power reactors, research reactors, test reactors). It is intended that all of these types of nuclear reactors are within scope of this entry and all of its subentries where applicable. This entry does not control fusion reactors.

3-2.2. Non-nuclear materials for reactors;

3-2.3. Plants for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel elements, and equipment especially designed or prepared therefor

Introductory Note:
Reprocessing irradiated nuclear fuel separates plutonium and uranium from intensely radioactive fission products and other transuranic elements. Different technical processes can accomplish this separation. However, over the years Purex has become the most commonly used and accepted process. Purex involves the dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuel in nitric acid, followed by separation of the uranium, plutonium, and fission products by solvent extraction using a mixture of tributyl phosphate in an organic diluent.

Purex facilities have process functions similar to each other, including: irradiated fuel decladding and/or chopping, fuel dissolution, solvent extraction, and process liquor storage. There may also be equipment for thermal denitration of uranium nitrate, conversion of plutonium nitrate to oxide or metal, and treatment of fission product waste liquor to a form suitable for long term storage or disposal. However, the specific type and configuration of the equipment performing these functions may differ between Purex facilities for several reasons, including the type and quantity of irradiated nuclear fuel to be reprocessed and the intended disposition of the recovered materials, and the safety and maintenance philosophy incorporated into the design of the facility.

"A plant for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel elements" includes the equipment and components which normally come in direct contact with and directly control the irradiated fuel and the major nuclear material and fission product processing streams.

These processes, including the complete systems for plutonium conversion and plutonium metal production, may be identified by the measures taken to avoid criticality (e.g., by geometry), radiation exposure (e.g. by shielding), and toxicity hazards (e.g., by containment).

Items of equipment that are considered to fall within the meaning of the phrase ‘and equipment especially designed or prepared’ for the reprocessing of irradiated fuel elements include:

3-2.4. Plants for the fabrication of nuclear reactor fuel elements, and equipment especially designed or prepared therefor

Introductory Note:
Nuclear fuel elements are manufactured from one or more of the source or special fissionable materials mentioned in Item 3-1. For oxide fuels, the most common type of fuel, equipment for pressing pellets, sintering, grinding and grading will be present. Mixed oxide fuels are handled in glove boxes (or equivalent containment) until they are sealed in the cladding. In all cases, the fuel is hermetically sealed inside a suitable cladding which is designed to be the primary envelope encasing the fuel so as to provide suitable performance and safety during reactor operation. Also, in all cases, precise control of processes, procedures and equipment to extremely high standards is necessary in order to ensure predictable and safe fuel performance.

Explanatory Note:
Items of equipment that are considered to fall within the meaning of the phrase ‘and equipment especially designed or prepared’ for the fabrication of fuel elements include equipment which:

Such equipment or systems of equipment may include, for example:

3-2.5. Plants for the separation of isotopes of natural uranium, depleted uranium or special fissionable material and equipment, other than analytical instruments, especially designed or prepared therefor

Introductory Note:
Plants, equipment and technology for the separation of uranium isotopes have, in many instances, a close relationship to plants, equipment and technology for isotope separation of “other elements”. In particular cases, the controls under Section 3-2.5. also apply to plants and equipment that are intended for isotope separation of “other elements”. These controls of plants and equipment for isotope separation of “other elements” are complementary to controls on plants and equipment especially designed or prepared for the processing, use or production of special fissionable material covered by the Group 3. These complementary Section 3-2.5. controls for uses involving “other elements” do not apply to the electromagnetic isotope separation process, which is addressed under Group 4 of the Export Control List.

Processes for which the controls in Section 3-2.5. equally apply whether the intended use is uranium isotope separation or isotope separation of “other elements” are: gas centrifuge, gaseous diffusion, the plasma separation process, and aerodynamic processes.

For some processes, the relationship to uranium isotope separation depends on the element being separated. These processes are: laser-based processes (e.g. molecular laser isotope separation and atomic vapour laser isotope separation), chemical exchange, and ion exchange. Suppliers must therefore evaluate these processes on a case-by-case basis to apply Section 3-2.5. controls for uses involving “other elements” accordingly.

Items of equipment that are considered to fall within the meaning of the phrase “equipment, other than analytical instruments, especially designed or prepared” for the separation of isotopes of uranium include:

3-2.5.1. Gas centrifuges and assemblies and components especially designed or prepared for use in gas centrifuges

Introductory Note:
The gas centrifuge normally consists of a thin-walled cylinder of between 75 mm and 650 mm diameter contained in a vacuum environment and spun at high peripheral speed of the order of 300 m/s or more with its central axis vertical. In order to achieve high speed the materials of construction for the rotating components have to be of a high strength to density ratio and the rotor assembly, and hence its individual components, have to be manufactured to very close tolerances in order to minimise the unbalance. In contrast to other centrifuges, the gas centrifuge for uranium enrichment is characterised by having within the rotor chamber a rotating disc-shaped baffle( or baffles) and a stationary tube arrangement for feeding and extracting the uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas and featuring at least three separate channels, of which two are connected to scoops extending from the rotor axis towards the periphery of the rotor chamber. Also contained within the vacuum environment are a number of critical items which do not rotate and which although they are especially designed are not difficult to fabricate nor are they fabricated out of unique materials. A centrifuge facility however requires a large number of these components, so that quantities can provide an important indication of end use.

3-2.5.2. Especially designed or prepared auxiliary systems, equipment and components for gas centrifuge enrichment plants

Introductory Note:
The auxiliary systems, equipment and components for a gas centrifuge enrichment plant are the systems of plant needed to feed UF6 to the centrifuges, to link the individual centrifuges to each other to form cascades (or stages) to allow for progressively higher enrichments and to extract the ‘product’ and ‘tails’ UF6 from the centrifuges, together with the equipment required to drive the centrifuges or to control the plant.

Normally UF6 is evaporated from the solid using heated autoclaves and is distributed in gaseous form to the centrifuges by way of cascade header pipework. The ‘product’ and ‘tails’ UF6 gas streams flowing from the centrifuges are also passed by way of cascade header pipework to cold traps (operating at about 203 K (-70° C)) where they are condensed prior to onward transfer into suitable containers for transportation or storage. Because an enrichment plant consists of many thousands of centrifuges arranged in cascades there are many kilometres of cascade header pipework, incorporating thousands of welds with a substantial amount of repetition of layout. The equipment, components and piping systems are fabricated to very high vacuum and cleanliness standards.

Explanatory Note:
Some of the items listed below either come into direct contact with the UF6 process gas or directly control the centrifuges and the passage of the gas from centrifuge to centrifuge and cascade to cascade. Materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 include copper, copper alloys, stainless steel, aluminium, aluminium oxide, aluminium alloys, nickel or alloys containing 60% by weight or more nickel and fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers.

3-2.5.3. Especially designed or prepared assemblies and components for use in gaseous diffusion enrichment

Introductory Note:
In the gaseous diffusion method of uranium isotope separation, the main technological assembly is a special porous gaseous diffusion barrier, heat exchanger for cooling the gas (which is heated by the process of compression), seal valves and control valves, and pipelines. In as much as gaseous diffusion technology uses UF6 , all equipment, pipeline and instrumentation surfaces (that come in contact with the gas) must be made of materials that remain stable in contact with UF6. A gaseous diffusion facility requires a number of these assemblies, so that quantities can provide an important indication of end use.

3-2.5.4. Especially designed or prepared auxiliary systems, equipment and components for use in gaseous diffusion enrichment

Introductory Note:
The auxiliary systems, equipment and components for gaseous diffusion enrichment plants are the systems of plant needed to feed UF6 to the gaseous diffusion assembly, to link the individual assemblies to each other to form cascades (or stages) to allow for progressively higher enrichments and to extract the ‘product’ and ‘tails’ UF6 from the diffusion cascades. Because of the high inertial properties of diffusion cascades, any interruption in their operation, and especially their shut-down, leads to serious consequences. Therefore, a strict and constant maintenance of vacuum in all technological systems, automatic protection from accidents, and precise automated regulation of the gas flow is of importance in a gaseous diffusion plant. All this leads to a need to equip the plant with a large number of special measuring, regulating and controlling systems.

Normally UF6 is evaporated from cylinders placed within autoclaves and is distributed in gaseous form to the entry point by way of cascade header pipework. The ‘product’ and ‘tails’ UF6 gas streams flowing from exit points are passed by way of cascade header pipework to either cold traps or to compression stations where the UF6 gas is liquefied prior to onward transfer into suitable containers for transportation or storage. Because a gaseous diffusion enrichment plant consists of a large number of gaseous diffusion assemblies arranged in cascades, there are many kilometres of cascade header pipework, incorporating thousands of welds with substantial amounts of repetition of layout. The equipment, components and piping systems are fabricated to very high vacuum and cleanliness standards.

Explanatory Note:
The items listed below either come into direct contact with the UF6 process gas or directly control the flow within the cascade. Materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 include copper, copper alloys, stainless steel, aluminium, aluminium oxide, aluminium alloys, nickel or alloys containing 60% by weight or more nickel and fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers.

3-2.5.5. Especially designed or prepared systems, equipment and components for use in aerodynamic enrichment plants

Introductory Note:
In aerodynamic enrichment processes, a mixture of gaseous UF6 and light gas (hydrogen or helium) is compressed and then passed through separating elements wherein isotopic separation is accomplished by the generation of high centrifugal forces over a curved-wall geometry. Two processes of this type have been successfully developed: the separation nozzle process and the vortex tube process. For both processes the main components of a separation stage include cylindrical vessels housing the special separation elements (nozzles or vortex tubes), gas compressors and heat exchangers to remove the heat of compression. An aerodynamic plant requires a number of these stages, so that quantities can provide an important indication of end use. Since aerodynamic processes use UF6, all equipment, pipeline and instrumentation surfaces (that come in contact with the gas) must be made of, or protected by materials that remain stable in contact with UF6.

Explanatory Note:
The items listed in this section either come into direct contact with the UF6 process gas or directly control the flow within the cascade. All surfaces which come into contact with the process gas are wholly made of or protected by UF6-resistant materials. For the purposes of the section relating to aerodynamic enrichment items, the materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 include copper, copper alloys, stainless steel, aluminium, aluminium oxide, aluminium alloys, nickel or alloys containing 60% by weight or more nickel and fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers.

3-2.5.6. Especially designed or prepared systems, equipment and components for use in chemical exchange or ion exchange enrichment plants.

Introductory Note:
The slight difference in mass between the isotopes of uranium causes small changes in chemical reaction Equilibria that can be used as a basis for separation of the isotopes. Two processes have been successfully developed: liquid-liquid chemical exchange and solid-liquid ion exchange.

In the liquid-liquid chemical exchange process, immiscible liquid phases (aqueous and organic) are counter currently contacted to give the cascading effect of thousands of separation stages. The aqueous phase consists of uranium chloride in hydrochloric acid solution; the organic phase consists of an extractant containing uranium chloride in an organic solvent. The contactors employed in the separation cascade can be liquid-liquid exchange columns (such as pulsed columns with sieve plates) or liquid centrifugal contactors. Chemical conversions (oxidation and reduction) are required at both ends of the separation cascade in order to provide for the reflux requirements at each end. A major design concern is to avoid contamination of the process streams with certain metal ions. Plastic, plastic-lined (including use of fluorocarbon polymers) and/or glass-lined columns and piping are therefore used.

In the solid-liquid ion-exchange process, enrichment is accomplished by uranium adsorption/desorption on a special, very fast-acting, ion-exchange resin or adsorbent. A solution of uranium in hydrochloric acid and other chemical agents is passed through cylindrical enrichment columns containing packed beds of the adsorbent. For a continuous process, a reflux system is necessary to release the uranium from the adsorbent back into the liquid flow so that ‘product’ and ‘tails’ can be collected. This is accomplished with the use of suitable reduction/oxidation chemical agents that are fully regenerated in separate external circuits and that may be partially regenerated within the isotopic separation columns themselves. The presence of hot concentrated hydrochloric acid solutions in the process requires that the equipment be made of or protected by special corrosion-resistant materials.

3-2.5.7. Especially designed or prepared systems, equipment and components for use in laser-based enrichment plants.

Introductory Note:
Present systems for enrichment processes using lasers fall into two categories: those in which the process medium is atomic uranium vapour and those in which the process medium is the vapour of a uranium compound sometimes mixed with another gas or gases. Common nomenclature for such processes include:

The systems, equipment and components for laser enrichment plants include:

The complexity of the spectroscopy of uranium atoms and compounds may require incorporation of any of a number of available laser and laser optics technologies.

Explanatory Note:
Many of the items listed in this section come into direct contact with uranium metal vapour or liquid or with process gas consisting of UF6 or a mixture of UF6 and other gases. All surfaces that come into direct contact with the uranium or UF6 are wholly made of or protected by corrosion-resistant materials. For the purposes of the section relating to laser-based enrichment items, the materials resistant to corrosion by the vapour or liquid of uranium metal or uranium alloys include yttria-coated graphite and tantalum; and the materials resistant to corrosion by UF6 include copper, copper alloys, stainless steel, aluminium, aluminium oxide, aluminium alloys, nickel or alloys containing 60% by weight or more nickel and fluorinated hydrocarbon polymers.

3-2.5.8. Especially designed or prepared systems, equipment and components for use in plasma separation enrichment plants.

Introductory Note:
In the plasma separation process, a plasma of uranium ions passes through an electric field tuned to the 235U ion resonance frequency so that they preferentially absorb energy and increase the diameter of their corkscrew-like orbits. Ions with a large diameter path are trapped to produce a product enriched in 235U. The plasma, which is made by ionising uranium vapor, is contained in a vacuum chamber with a high-strength magnetic field produced by a superconducting magnet. The main technological systems of the process include the uranium plasma generation system, the separator module with superconducting magnet (see Group 4), and metal removal systems for the collection of ‘product’ and ‘tails’.

3-2.5.9. Especially designed or prepared systems, equipment and components for use in electromagnetic enrichment plants

Introductory Note:
In the electromagnetic process, uranium metal ions produced by ionization of a salt feed material (typically uranium tetrachloride (UCI4)) are accelerated and passed through a magnetic field that has the effect of causing the ions of different isotopes to follow different paths. The major components of an electromagnetic isotope separator include: a magnetic field for ion-beam diversion/separation of the isotopes, an ion source with its acceleration system, and a collection system for the separated ions. Auxiliary systems for the process include the magnet power supply system, the ion source high-voltage power supply system, the vacuum system, and extensive chemical handling systems for recovery of product and cleaning/recycling of components.

3-2.6 Plants for the production or concentration of heavy water, deuterium and deuterium compounds and equipment especially designed or prepared therefor;

Introductory Note:
Heavy water can be produced by a variety of processes. However, the two processes that have proven to be commercially viable are the water-hydrogen sulphide exchange process (GS process) and the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process.

The GS process is based upon the exchange of hydrogen and deuterium between water and hydrogen sulphide within a series of towers which are operated with the top section cold and the bottom section hot. Water flows down the towers while the hydrogen sulphide gas circulates from the bottom to the top of the towers. A series of perforated trays are used to promote mixing between the gas and the water. Deuterium migrates to the water at low temperatures and to the hydrogen sulphide at high temperatures. Gas or water, enriched in deuterium, is removed from the first stage towers at the junction of the hot and cold sections and the process is repeated in subsequent, stage towers. The product of the last stage, water enriched up to 30% by weight in deuterium, is sent to a distillation unit to, produce reactor grade heavy water; i.e., 99.75% by weight deuterium oxide (D2O).

The ammonia-hydrogen exchange process can extract deuterium from synthesis gas through contact with liquid ammonia(NH3) in the presence of a catalyst. The synthesis gas is fed into exchange towers and to an ammonia converter. Inside the towers the gas flows from the bottom to the top while the liquid ammonia (NH3) flows from the top to the bottom. The deuterium is stripped from the hydrogen in the synthesis gas and concentrated in the NH3. The NH3 then flows into an ammonia cracker at the bottom of the tower while the gas flows into an ammonia converter at the top. Further enrichment takes place in subsequent stages and reactor grade heavy water is produced through final distillation. The synthesis gas feed can be provided by an ammonia plant that, in turn, can be constructed in association with a heavy water ammonia-hydrogen exchange plant. The ammonia-hydrogen exchange process can also use ordinary water as a feed source of deuterium.

Many of the key equipment items for heavy water production plants using GS or the ammonia-hydrogen exchange processes are common to several segments of the chemical and petroleum industries. This is particularly so for small plants using the GS process. However, few of the items are available off-the-shelf. The GS and ammonia hydrogen processes require the handling of large quantities of flammable, corrosive and toxic fluids at elevated pressures.

Accordingly, in establishing the design and operating standards for plants and equipment using these processes, careful attention to the materials selection and specifications is required to ensure long service life with high safety and reliability factors. The choice of scale is primarily a function of economics and need. Thus, most of the equipment items would be prepared according to the requirements of the customer.

Finally, it should be noted that, in both the GS and the ammonia-hydrogen exchange processes, items of equipment which individually are not especially designed or prepared for heavy water production can be assembled into systems which are especially designed or prepared for producing heavy water. The catalyst production system used in the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process and water distillation systems used for the final concentration of heavy water to reactor-grade in either process are examples of such systems.

The items of equipment which are especially designed or prepared for the production of heavy water utilising either the water-hydrogen sulphide exchange process or the ammonia-hydrogen exchange process include the following:

3-2.7. Plants for the conversion of uranium and plutonium for use in the fabrication of fuel elements and the separation of uranium isotopes as defined in Items 3-2.4. and 3-2.5. respectively, and equipment especially designed or prepared therefor;

3-2.7.1. Plants for the conversion of uranium and equipment especially designed or prepared therefor

Introductory Note:
Uranium conversion plants and systems may perform one or more transformations from one uranium chemical species to another, including: conversion of uranium ore concentrates to uranium trioxide (UO3), conversion of UO3 to uranium dioxide (UO2), conversion of uranium oxides to uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), UF6, or UCl4, conversion of UF4 to UF6, conversion of UF6 to UF4, conversion of UF4 to uranium metal, and conversion of uranium fluorides to UO2.

Many of the key equipment items for uranium conversion plants are common to several segments of the chemical process industry. For example, the types of equipment employed in these processes may include: furnaces, rotary kilns, fluidized bed reactors, flame tower reactors, liquid centrifuges, distillation columns and liquid-liquid extraction columns. However, few of the items are available 'off-the-shelf ', most would be prepared according to the requirements and specifications of the customer. In some instances, special design and construction considerations are required to address the corrosive properties of some of the chemicals handledhydrogen fluoride (HF), fluorine (F2),chlorine trifluoride (CIF3), and uranium fluorides) as well as nuclear criticality concerns. Finally, it should be noted that, in all of the uranium conversion processes, items of equipment which individually are not especially designed or prepared for uranium conversion can be assembled into systems which are especially designed or prepared for use in uranium conversion.

3-2.7.2. Plants for the conversion of plutonium and equipment especially designed or prepared therefor

Introductory Note:
Plutonium conversion plants and systems perform one or more transformations from one plutonium chemical species to another, including: conversion of plutonium nitrate (PuN) to plutonium dioxide (PuO2), conversion of PuO2 to plutonium tetrafluoride (PuF 4 ), and conversion of PuF4 to plutonium metal. Plutonium conversion plants are usually associated with reprocessing facilities, but may also be associated with plutonium fuel fabrication facilities. Many of the key equipment items for plutonium conversion plants are common to several segments of the chemical process industry. For example, the types of equipment employed in these processes may include: furnaces, rotary kilns, fluidised bed reactors, flame tower reactors, liquid centrifuges, distillation columns and liquid-liquid extraction columns. Hot cells, glove boxes and remote manipulators may also be required. However, few of the items are available off-the-shelf; most would be prepared according to the requirements and specifications of the customer. Particular care in designing for the special radiological, toxicity and criticality hazards associated with plutonium is essential.

In some instances, special design and construction considerations are required to address the corrosive properties of some of the chemicals handled (e.g. HF). Finally, it should be noted that, for all plutonium conversion processes, items of equipment which individually are not especially designed or prepared for plutonium conversion can be assembled into systems which are especially designed or prepared for use in plutonium conversion.

3-3. Software

“Software” especially designed or modified for the “development”, “production”, or “use” of items specified in Group 3.

3-4. Technology

“Technology” according to the Nuclear Technology Note for the “development”, “production”, or “use” of items specified in Group 3.

Group 4 – Nuclear-Related Dual-Use List

(All destinations. All destinations applies to all Group 4 Items.)

Note:
Terms in ‘single quotations’ are usually defined within each entry of the list.

Terms in “double quotations” are defined at the end of Group 4.

Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Note:

The export of nuclear and nuclear-related items is also controlled by the CNSC under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA) and Regulations. Therefore, the export of nuclear and nuclear-related items, not listed in Group 4 or which meet the specific Group 4 decontrol notes may still require a license from the CNSC. Information on export licensing requirements under the NSCA may be obtained by contacting the CNSC.

General Technology Note:
The export of “technology” required for the “development”, “production” or “use” of items controlled in Group 4, is controlled according to the provisions of Group 4. This “technology” remains under control even when applicable to non-controlled items.

The approval of items for export also authorizes the export to the same end-user of the minimum “technology” required for the installation, operation, maintenance and repair of the items.

Controls on “technology” transfer, do not apply to information “in the public domain” or to “basic scientific research”.

General Software Note:
The transfer of “software” is controlled according to Group 4. The approval of any Group 4 item for export also authorises the export, or transfer, to the same end user of the minimum “software”, excluding source code, required for the installation, operation, maintenance or repair of the item.

Note:
The General Software Note also authorises export of “software”, excluding source code, intended to only correct defects (bug fixes) in a previously legally exported item, provided that the capability and/or performance of the item are not otherwise enhanced.

Note:
Controls on “software” transfers do not apply to “software” as follows:

4-1. Industrial Equipment

4-1.A Equipment, Assemblies and Components

4-1.B. Test and Production Equipment

4-1.B.1. Flow-forming machines, spin-forming machines capable of flow-forming functions, and mandrels, as follows:

Note:
Item 4-1.B.1. includes machines which have only a single roller designed to deform metal plus two auxiliary rollers which support the mandrel, but do not participate directly in the deformation process.

4-1.B.2. Machine tools, as follows, and any combination thereof, for removing or cutting metals, ceramics, or composites, which, according to the manufacturer’s technical specifications, can be equipped with electronic devices for simultaneous “contouring control” in two or more axes:

N.B.:
For “numerical control” units controlled by their associated “software”, see Item 4-1.D.3.

Notes:

Technical Notes:

4-1.B.3. Dimensional inspection machines, instruments, or systems, as follows:

4-1.B.4. Controlled atmosphere (vacuum or inert gas) induction furnaces and power supplies therefor, as follows:

4-1.B.5. ‘Isostatic presses’, and related equipment, as follows:

Technical Notes:

4-1.B.6. Vibration test systems, equipment, and components as follows:

Technical Note:
In Item 4-1.B.6. ‘baretable’ means a flat table, or surface, with no fixtures or fittings.

4-1.B.7. Vacuum or other controlled atmosphere metallurgical melting and casting furnaces and related equipment, as follows:

4-1.C. Materials

None

4-1.D. Software

4-1.E. Technology

4-2. Materials

4-2.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

4-2.B. Test and Production Equipment

4-2.C. Materials

4-2.C.1. Aluminum alloys having both of the following characteristics:

Technical Note:
In Item 4-2.C.1. the phrase ‘capable of’ encompasses aluminium alloys before or after heat treatment.

4-2.C.2. Beryllium metal, alloys containing more than 50% beryllium by weight, beryllium compounds, manufactures thereof, and waste or scrap of any of the foregoing.

Note:
Item 4-2.C.2. does not control the following:

4-2.C.3. Bismuth having both of the following characteristics:

4-2.C.4. Boron enriched in the boron-10 (10B) isotope to greater than its natural isotopic abundance, as follows: elemental boron, compounds, mixtures containing boron, manufactures thereof, waste or scrap of any of the foregoing.

Note:
In Item 4-2.C.4. mixtures containing boron include boron loaded materials.

Technical Note:
The natural isotopic abundance of boron-10 is approximately 18.5 weight percent (20 atom percent).

4-2.C.5. Calcium having both of the following characteristics:

4-2.C.6. Chlorine trifluoride (ClF3).

4-2.C.7. “Fibrous or filamentary materials”, and prepregs, as follows:

Technical Notes:

4-2.C.8. Hafnium metal, alloys containing more than 60% hafnium by weight, hafnium compounds containing more than 60% hafnium by weight, manufactures thereof, and waste or scrap of any of the foregoing.

4-2.C.9. Lithium enriched in the lithium-6 (6Li) isotope to greater than its natural isotopic abundance, and products or devices containing enriched lithium, as follows: elemental lithium, alloys, compounds, mixtures containing lithium, manufactures thereof, waste or scrap of any of the foregoing.

Note:
Item 4-2.C.9. does not control thermoluminescent dosimeters.

Technical Note:
The natural isotopic abundance of lithium-6 is approximately 6.5 weight percent (7.5 atom percent).

4-2.C.10. Magnesium having both of the following characteristics:

4-2.C.11. Maraging steel ‘capable of’ an ultimate tensile strength of 1,950 MPa or more at 293 K (20 °C).

Note:
Item 4-2.C.11. does not control forms in which all linear dimensions are 75mm or less.

Technical Note:
In Item 4-2.C.11. the phrase ‘capable of’ encompasses maraging steel before or after heat treatment.

4-2.C.12. Radium-226 (226Ra), radium-226 alloys, radium-226 compounds, mixtures containing radium-226, manufactures thereof, and products or devices containing any of the foregoing.

Note:
Item 4-2.C.12. does not control the following:

4-2.C.13. Titanium alloys having both of the following characteristics:

Technical Note:
In Item 4-2.C.13 the phrase ‘capable of’ encompasses titanium alloys before or after heat treatment.

4-2.C.14. Tungsten, tungsten carbide, and alloys containing more than 90% tungsten by weight, having both of the following characteristics:

Note:
Item 4-2.C.14. does not control manufactures specially designed as weights or gamma-ray collimators.

4-2.C.15. Zirconium with a hafnium content of less than 1 part hafnium to 500 parts zirconium by weight, as follows: metal, alloys containing more than 50% zirconium by weight, compounds, manufactures thereof, waste or scrap of any of the foregoing.

Note:
Item 4-2.C.15. does not control zirconium in the form of foil having a thickness of 0.10 mm or less.

4-2.C.16. Nickel powder and porous nickel metal, as follows:

N.B.:
For nickel powders which are especially prepared for the manufacture of gaseous diffusion barriers see Group 3, Item 3-2.5.3.

Note:
Item 4-2.C.16. does not control the following:

4-2.C.17. Tritium, tritium compounds, mixtures containing tritium in which the ratio of tritium to hydrogen atoms exceeds 1 part in 1,000, and products or devices containing any of the foregoing.

Note:
Item 4-2.C.17. does not control a product or device containing less than 1.48 x 103 GBq of tritium.

4-2.C.18. Helium-3 (3He), mixtures containing helium-3, and products or devices containing any of the foregoing.

Note:
Item 4-2.C.18. does not control a product or device containing less than 1 g of helium-3.

4-2.C.19. Radionuclides appropriate for making neutron sources based on alpha-n reaction:

Actinium-225(225Ac), Curium-244(244Cm), Polonium-209(209Po), Actinium-227(227Ac), Einsteinium-253(253Es), Polonium-210(210Po), Californium-253(253Cf), Einsteinium-254(254Es), Radium-223(223Ra), Curium-240( 240 Cm), Gadolinium-148(148Gd), Thorium-227(227Th), Curium-241(241Cm), Plutonium-236(236Pu), Thorium-228(228Th), Curium-242(242Cm), Plutonium-238(238Pu), Uranium-230(230U), Curium-243(243Cm), Polonium-208(208Pu), Uranium-232(232U).

In the following forms:

Note:
Item 4-2.C.19. does not control a product or device containing less than 3.7 GBq of activity.

4-2.C.20 Rhenium and alloys containing 90% by weight or more rhenium, and alloys of rhenium and tungsten containing 90% by weight or more of any combination of rhenium and tungsten, having both of the following characteristics:

4-2.D. Software

None

4-2.E. Technology

4-3. Uranium Isotope Separation Equipment and Components (other than Listed in Group 3)

4-3.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

4-3.A.1. Frequency changers or generators, usable as a variable frequency or fixed frequency motor drive, having all of the following characteristics:

N.B.:

Notes:

Technical Note:

4-3.A.2. Lasers, laser amplifiers and oscillators as follows:

4-3.A.3. Valves having all of the following characteristics:

Technical Note:

For valves with different inlet and outlet diameter, the nominal size parameter in Item 4-3.A.3.a. refers to the smallest diameter.

4-3.A.4. Superconducting solenoidal electromagnets having all of the following characteristics:

Note:
Item 4-3.A.4 does not control magnets specially designed for and exported ‘as part of’ medical nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging systems.

N.B.:

‘As part of’, does not necessarily mean physical part in the same shipment. Separate shipments from different sources are allowed, provided the related export documents clearly specify the ‘as part of’ relationship.

4-3.A.5. High-power direct current power supplies having both of the following characteristics:

4-3.A.6. High-voltage direct current power supplies having both of the following characteristics:

4-3.A.7. All types of pressure transducers capable of measuring absolute pressures and having all of the following characteristics:

Technical Notes:

4-3.A.8. Vacuum pumps having all of the following characteristics:

4-3.A.9. Bellows-sealed scroll-type compressors and bellows-sealed scroll-type vacuum pumps having all of the following characteristics:

4-3.B. Test and Production Equipment

4-3.C. Materials

None

4-3.D. Software

4-3.E. Technology

4-4. Heavy Water Production Plant Related Equipment (other than Listed in Group 3)

4-4.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

4-4.B. Test and Production Equipment

4-4.C. Materials

None

4-4.D. Software

None

4-4.E. Technology

4-5. Test and Measurement Equipment for the Development of Nuclear Explosive Devices

4-5.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

4-5.B. Test and Production Equipment

4-5.C. Materials

None

4-5.D. Software

4-5.E. Technology

“Technology” according to the General Technology Note for the “development”, “production” or “use” of equipment, material or “software” specified in 4-5.A. through 4-5.D.

4-6. Components for Nuclear Explosive Devices

4-6.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

4-6.B. Test and Production Equipment

None

4-6.C. Materials

4-6.D. Software

None

4-6.E. Technology

Definitions of Terms Used in Groups 3 and 4

“Accuracy”
Usually measured in terms of inaccuracy, defined as the maximum deviation, positive or negative, of an indicated value from an accepted standard or true value.
“Angular position deviation”
The maximum difference between angular position and the actual, very accurately measured angular position after the workpiece mount of the table has been turned out of its initial position.
“Basic scientific research”
Experimental or theoretical work undertaken principally to acquire new knowledge of the fundamental principles of phenomena and observable facts, not primarily directed toward a specific practical aim or objective.
“Contouring control”
Two or more “numerically controlled” motions operating in accordance with instructions that specify the next required position and the required feed rates to that position. These feed rates are varied in relation to each other so that a desired contour is generated (Ref.: International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 2806 (1994) as amended).
“Development”
Is related to all phases prior to “production”, such as: design, design research, design analysis, design concepts, assembly and testing of prototypes, pilot production schemes, design data, process of transforming design data into a product, configuration design, integration design, layouts.
“Fibrous or filamentary materials”
Means continuous ‘filament’, ‘monofilaments’, ‘yarns’, ‘rovings’, ‘tows’, or ‘tapes’.

N.B.: ‘Filament’ or ‘monofilament’ is the smallest increment of fibre, usually several μm in diameter.
‘Roving’ is a bundle (typically 12-120) of approximately parallel ‘strands’.
‘Strand’ is a bundle of ‘filaments’ (typically over 200) arranged approximately parallel.
‘Tape’ is a material constructed of interlaced or unidirectional ‘filaments’, ‘strands’, ‘rovings’, ‘tows’, or ‘yarns’, etc., usually preimpregnated with resin.
‘Tow’ is a bundle of ‘filaments’, usually approximately parallel.
‘Yarn’ is a bundle of twisted ‘strands’.

'Filament'
See “Fibrous or filamentary materials”.
“In the public domain”
“In the public domain”, as it applies herein, means “technology” or “software” that has been made available without restrictions upon its further dissemination (Copyright restrictions do not remove “technology” or “software” from being “in the public domain”).
“Linearity”
(Usually measured in terms of nonlinearity) is the maximum deviation of the actual characteristic (average of upscale and downscale readings), positive or negative, from a straight line so positioned as to equalise and minimise the maximum deviations.
“Measurement uncertainty”
The characteristic parameter which specifies in what range around the output value, the correct value of the measurable variable lies, with a confidence level of 95%. It includes the uncorrected systematic deviations, the uncorrected backlash, and the random deviations.
“Microprogram”
A sequence of elementary instructions, maintained in a special storage, the execution of which is initiated by the introduction of its reference instruction into an instruction register.
“Monofilament”
See “Fibrous or filamentary materials”.
“Numerical control”
The automatic control of a process performed by a device that makes use of numeric data usually introduced as the operation is in progress (Ref.: ISO 2382 (2015)).
“other elements”
All elements other than hydrogen, uranium and plutonium
“Positioning accuracy”
Of “numerically controlled” machine tools is to be determined and presented in accordance with Item 4-1.B.2., in conjunction with the requirements below:
  • Test conditions (ISO 230/2 (1988), paragraph 3):
    • 1. For 12 h before and during measurements, the machine tool and accuracy measuring equipment will be kept at the same ambient temperature. During the premeasurement time, the slides of the machine will be continuously cycled identically to the way they will be cycled during the accuracy measurements;
    • 2. The machine shall be equipped with any mechanical, electronic, or “software” compensation to be exported with the machine;
    • 3. Accuracy of measuring equipment for the measurements shall be at least four times more accurate than the expected machine tool accuracy;
    • 4. Power supply for slide drives shall be as follows:
      • Line voltage variation shall not be greater than ±10% of nominal rated voltage;
      • Frequency variation shall not be greater than ±2 Hz of normal frequency;
      • Lineouts or interrupted service are not permitted.
  • Test program (paragraph 4):
    • 1. Feed rate (velocity of slides) during measurement shall be the rapid traverse rate;

      N.B.: In the case of machine tools which generate optical quality surfaces, the feed rate shall be equal to or less than 50 mm per minute;

    • 2. Measurements shall be made in an incremental manner from one limit of the axis travel to the other without returning to the starting position for each move to the target position;
    • 3. Axes not being measured shall be retained at mid-travel during test of an axis.
  • Presentation of test results (paragraph 2): The results of the measurements must include:
    • 1. “Positioning accuracy” (A); and
    • 2. The mean reversal error (B).
“Production”
Means all production phases, such as: construction, production engineering, manufacture, integration, assembly (mounting), inspection, testing, and quality assurance.
“Program”
A sequence of instructions to carry out a process in, or convertible into, a form executable by an electronic computer.
“Resolution”
The least increment of a measuring device; on digital instruments, the least significant bit. . (Ref.: American National Standards Institute (ANSI) B-89.1.12)
'Roving'
See “Fibrous and filamentary materials”.
“Software”
A collection of one or more “programs” or “microprograms” fixed in any tangible medium of expression.
'Strand'
See “Fibrous or filamentary materials”.
'Tape'
See “Fibrous or filamentary materials”.
“Technical assistance”
May take forms, such as: instruction, skills, training, working knowledge, consulting services.

N.B.: “Technical assistance” may involve transfer of “technical data”.

“Technical data”
May take forms such as blueprints, plans, drawings, photoprints or negatives, diagrams, models, formulae, tables, engineering designs and specifications, manuals and instructions, whether in written form or recorded on other media or devices such as disk, tape, read-only memories.
“Technology”
Specific information required for the “development”, “production” or “use”, of an item. This information may take the form of “technical data” or “technical assistance”.
'Tow'
See “Fibrous and filamentary materials”.
“Use”
Operation, installation (including on-site installation), maintenance (checking), repair, overhaul and refurbishing.
'Yarn'
See “Fibrous and filamentary materials”.

Acronyms And Abbreviations Used In Groups 3 And 4

Note:
The International System of Units (SI) is used in Group 3 and Group 4. In all cases, the physical quantity defined in SI units should be considered the official recommended control value.

Commonly used abbreviations (and their prefixes denoting size) in Group 3 and Group 4 are as follows:

Aampere(s)Electric current
CASChemical Abstracts Service 
°Cdegree(s) CelsiusTemperature
cmcentimetre(s)Length
cm2square centimetre(s)Area
cm3cubic centimetre(s)Volume
°degree(s)Angle
ggram(s)Mass
g0acceleration of gravity (9.80665 m/s2)Acceleration
GBqgigabecquerel(s)Activity (radioactive)
GPagigapascal(s)Pressure
Gygray(s)Absorbed ionising radiation
GHzgigahertzFrequency
Hhenry(s)Electrical inductance
hhour(s)Time
HzhertzFrequency
Jjoule(s)Energy, work, heat
KeVKiloelectron volt(s)Energy, electrical
kgkilogram(s)Mass
kHzkilohertzFrequency
kNkilonewton(s)Force
kjkilojoule(s)Energy, work, heat
kPakilopascal(s)Pressure
kVkilovolt(s)Electrical potential
kWkilowatt(s)Power
KkelvinThermodynamic temperature
llitre(s)Volume (liquids)
MeVmegaelectron volt(s)Energy, electrical
mmetre(s)Length
m2square metre(s)Area
m3cubic metre(s)Volume
mAmilliamp(s)Electric current
mlmillilitre(s)Volume
mmmillimetre(s)Length
mPamillipascal(s)Pressure
minminute(s)Time
MPamegapascal(s)Pressure
MWmegawatt(s)Power
μFmicrofarad(s)Electrical capacitance
μmmicrometre(s)Length
μsmicrosecond(s)Time
Nnewton(s)Force
nFnanofarad(s)Electrical capacitance
nHnanohenry(s)Electrical inductance
nmnanometre(s)Length
nsnanosecond(s)Time
Ωohm(s)Electric resistance
Papascal(s)Pressure
pspicosecond(s)Time
rpmrevolution(s) per minuteAngular velocity
ssecond(s)Time
second(s) of arcAngle
Ttesla(s)Magnetic flux density
uunified atomic mass unitMass on an atomic or molecular scale
Vvolt(s)Electrical potential
WWatt(s)Power

Group 5 – Miscellaneous Goods and Technology

Forest Products

5101. Logs of all species of wood (All destinations)

5102. Pulpwood of all species of wood (All destinations)

5103. Blocks, bolts, blanks, boards and any other material or product of red cedar that is suitable for use in the manufacture of shakes or shingles. (All destinations)

5104. Softwood Lumber Products (United States)

Agriculture and Food Products

5200. Milk Products and Infant Formulas (All destinations)

Skim milk powders that are classified under subheading 0402.10, milk protein concentrates that are classified under subheading 0404.90 and infant formulas containing more than 10% on a dry weight basis of cow’s milk solids that are classified under subheading 1901.10 of the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System 2017.

5201. Peanut Butter that is classified under tariff item No. 2008.11.10 in the list of Tariff Provisions set out in the schedule to the Customs Tariff. (All destinations)

5203. Sugar-containing Products

Sugar-containing products as follows:

5204. Sugars, Syrups and Molasses

Sugars, syrups and molasses as follows:

5205. High-Sugar-containing Products (EU country or other CETA beneficiary)

High-sugar-containing products classified under subheadings ex 1302.20, ex 1806.10, ex 1806.20, ex 2101.12, ex 2101.20 and ex 2106.90 of Annex 5-A to Annex 5 of the Protocol on Rules of Origin and Origin Procedures of CETA (Annex 5-A), containing 65 percent or more by net weight of added cane or beet sugar classified under subheadings 1701.91 to 1701.99 of Annex 5-A, for export to an EU country or other CETA beneficiary that

5206. Sugar Confectionery and Chocolate Preparations (EU country or other CETA beneficiary)

Sugar confectionery and chocolate preparations classified under headings and subheadings 17.04, 1806.31, 1806.32 and 1806.90 of Annex 5-A to Annex 5 of the Protocol on Rules of Origin and Origin Procedures of CETA (Annex 5-A) for export to an EU country or other CETA beneficiary that

5207. Processed Foods (EU country or other CETA beneficiary)

Processed foods classified under headings and subheadings 19.01, ex 1902.11, ex 1902.19, ex 1902.20, ex 1902.30, 1904.10, 1904.20, 1904.90, 19.05, 2009.81, ex 2009.89, 2103.90, ex 2106.10 and ex 2106.90 of Annex 5-A to Annex 5 of the Protocol on Rules of Origin and Origin Procedures of CETA (Annex 5-A) for export to an EU country or other CETA beneficiary that

5208. Dog and Cat Food (EU country or other CETA beneficiary)

Dog and cat food classified under subheadings 2309.10 and ex 2309.90 of Annex 5-A to Annex 5 of the Protocol on Rules of Origin and Origin Procedures of CETA (Annex 5-A) for export to an EU country or other CETA beneficiary that

Apparel Goods

5209. Apparel Goods (EU country or other CETA beneficiary)

Apparel goods classified under headings and subheadings 6102.30, 61.04, 6108.92, 61.14, 62.01 and 62.05 of Annex 5-A to Annex 5 of the Protocol on Rules of Origin and Origin Procedures of CETA (Annex 5-A) for export to an EU country or other CETA beneficiary that

Vehicles

5210. Vehicles (EU country or other CETA beneficiary)

Vehicles classified under subheadings 8703.21, 8703.22, 8703.23, 8703.24, 8703.31, 8703.32, 8703.33, 8703.80 and 8703.90 of the Council Regulation (EEC) No 2658/87 of 23 July 1987 on the tariff and statistical nomenclature and on the Common Customs Tariff, made by the European Union, for export to an EU country or other CETA beneficiary that

Foreign Origin Goods and Technology

United States Origin Goods and Technology

5400. United States Origin Goods and Technology

All goods and technology of United States origin, unless they are included elsewhere in this List, whether in bond or cleared by the Canada Border Services Agency, other than goods or technology that have been further processed or manufactured outside the United States so as to result in a substantial change in value, form or use of the goods or technology or in the production of new goods or technology.

(All destinations other than the United States)

Goods and Technology in Transit

5401. Goods and Technology in Transit

Other Military and Strategic Goods and Technology

5501. Blinding Laser Weapons (All destinations)

Laser weapons that are specifically designed, as their sole combat function or as one of their combat functions, to cause permanent blindness to the naked eye or to the eye with corrective eyesight devices.

5502. Nuclear Fusion Reactors

5503. Anti-personnel Mines (All destinations)

Anti-personnel mines as defined in section 2 of the Anti-Personnel Mines Convention Implementation Act.

5504. Strategic Goods and Technology

(All destinations other than United States)

5505. Goods and Technology for Certain Uses (Catch-all)

Group 6 - Missile Technology Control Regime List

Note:

Terms in “double quotation marks” are defined terms. Refer to Definitions at the end of Group 6.

General Technology Note:

The transfer of “technology” directly associated with any goods controlled in Group 6 is controlled according to the provisions in each Item to the extent permitted by national legislation. The approval of any Group 6 item for export also authorizes the export to the same end-user of the minimum “technology” required for the installation, operation, maintenance, and repair of the item.

Note:

Controls do not apply to “technology” “in the public domain” or to “basic scientific research”.

General Software Note:

Group 6 does not control “software” which is either:

Note:

The General Software Note only applies to general purpose, mass market “software”.

General Minimum Software Note:
The approval of any Group 6 item for export also authorizes the export, or transfer, to the same end user of the minimum “software”, excluding source code, required for the installation, operation, maintenance or repair of the item in order to ensure the item’s safe operation as originally intended.

Note:
The General Minimum Software Note also authorizes export of “software” intended to correct defects (bug fixes) in a previously legally exported item, provided that the capability and/or performance of the item are not otherwise enhanced.

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Numbers:

In some instances chemicals are listed by name and CAS number. Chemicals of the same structural formula (including hydrates) are controlled regardless of name or CAS number. CAS numbers are shown to assist in identifying whether a particular chemical or mixture is controlled, irrespective of nomenclature. CAS numbers cannot be used as unique identifiers because some forms of the listed chemical have different CAS numbers and mixtures containing a listed chemical may also have different CAS numbers.

Category I

6-1. Complete Delivery Systems

(All destinations applies to all 6-1 Items)

6-1.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-1.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-1.C. Materials

None

6-1.D. Software

6-1.E. Technology

6-2. Complete Subsystems Usable for Complete Delivery Systems

(All destinations applies to all 6-2 Items)

6-2.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

Note:

The exceptions in 6-2.A.1.b., 6-2.A.1.d., 6-2.A.1.e. and 6-2.A.1.f. above may be treated as Category II if the subsystem is exported subject to end-use statements and quantity limits appropriate for the excepted end-use stated above.

6-2.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-2.C. Materials

None

6-2.D. Software

6-2.E. Technology

Category II

6-3. Propulsion Components and Equipment

6-3.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-3.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-3.C. Materials

6-3.D. Software

6-3.E. Technology

6-4. Propellants, Chemicals and Propellant Production

6-4.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

None

6-4.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-4.C. Materials

N.B.:
CAS numbers included in Item 6-4.C. are Technical Notes. For the use of CAS numbers in Group 6, see the Introduction section - Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Numbers Note.

6-4.C.1. Composite and composite modified double base propellants.

6-4.C.2. Fuel substances as follows:

6-4.C.3. Oxidisers/Fuels as follows:

Perchlorates, chlorates or chromates mixed with powdered metals or other high energy fuel components.

6-4.C.4. Oxidiser substances as follows:

6-4.C.5. Polymeric substances, as follows:

6-4.C.6. Other propellant additives and agents as follows:

6-4.C.7. ‘Gel propellants’ specifically formulated for use in the systems specified in 6 1.A., 6-19.A.1. or 6-19.A.2.

6-4.D. Software

6-4.E. Technology

6-5. Reserved for Future Use

6-6. Production of Structural Composites, Pyrolytic Deposition, Densification, and Structural Materials

6-6.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-6.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-6.C. Materials

6-6.D. Software

6-6.E. Technology

6-7. Reserved for Future Use

6-8. Reserved for Future Use

6-9. Instrumentation, Navigation and Direction Finding

6-9.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-9.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-9.C. Materials

None

6-9.D. Software

6-9.E. Technology

6-10. Flight Control

6-10.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

Note:

1. Governments may permit the export of systems, equipment or valves specified in 6-10.A. as part of a manned aircraft or satellite or in quantities appropriate for replacement parts for manned aircraft.

2. For conversion of manned aircraft to operate as unmanned aerial vehicles specified in 6-1.A.2., Item 6-10.A. includes the systems, equipment and valves designed or modified to enable operation of manned aircraft as unmanned aerial vehicles.

6-10.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-10.C. Materials

None

6-10.D. Software

Note:

Governments may permit the export of “software” specified in 6-10.D.1. as part of a manned aircraft or satellite or in quantities appropriate for replacement parts for manned aircraft.

6-10.E. Technology

6-11. Avionics

6-11.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-11.B. Test and Production Equipment

None

6-11.C. Materials

None

6-11.D. Software

6-11.E. Technology

6-12. Launch Support

6-12.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-12.B. Test and Production Equipment

None

6-12.C. Materials

None

6-12.D. Software

6-12.E. Technology

6-13. Computers

6-13.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-13.B. Test and Production Equipment

None

6-13.C. Materials

None

6-13.D. Software

None

6-13.E. Technology

Note:

Governments may permit the export of Item 6-13. equipment as part of a manned aircraft or satellite or in quantities appropriate for replacement parts for manned aircraft.

6-14. Analogue-to-Digital Converters

6-14.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-14.B. Test and Production Equipment

None

6-14.C. Materials

None

6-14.D. Software

None

6-14.E. Technology

6-15. Test Facilities and Equipment

6-15.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

None

6-15.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-15.C. Materials

None

6-15.D. Software

6-15.E. Technology

6-16. Modelling-Simulation and Design Integration

6-16.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-16.B. Test and Production Equipment

None

6-16.C. Materials

None

6-16.D. Software

6-16.E. Technology

6-17. Stealth

6-17.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-17.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-17.C. Materials

6-17.D. Software

6-17.E. Technology

6-18. Nuclear Effects Protection

6-18.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-18.B. Test and Production Equipment

None

6-18.C. Materials

None

6-18.D. Software

None

6-18.E. Technology

6-19. Other Complete Delivery Systems

6-19.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-19.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-19.C. Materials

None

6-19.D. Software

6-19.E. Technology

6-20. Other Complete Subsystems

6-20.A. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

6-20.B. Test and Production Equipment

6-20.C. Materials

None

6-20.D. Software

6-20.E. Technology

Goup 6 – Definitions

For the purpose of Group 6, the following definitions apply:

“Accuracy”
Usually measured in terms of inaccuracy, means the maximum deviation, positive or negative, of an indicated value from an accepted standard or true value.
“Basic scientific research”
Experimental or theoretical work undertaken principally to acquire new knowledge of the fundamental principles of phenomena or observable facts, not primarily directed towards a specific practical aim or objective.
“Development”
Is related to all phases prior to “production” such as:
  • - design
  • - design research
  • - design analysis
  • - design concepts
  • - assembly and testing of prototypes
  • - pilot production schemes
  • - design data
  • - process of transforming design data into a product
  • - configuration design
  • - integration design
  • - layouts
“In the public domain”
This means “software” or “technology” which has been made available without restrictions upon its further dissemination. (Copyright restrictions do not remove “software” or “technology” from being “in the public domain”.)
“Microcircuit”
A device in which a number of passive and/or active elements are considered as indivisibly associated on or within a continuous structure to perform the function of a circuit.
“Microprograms”
A sequence of elementary instructions maintained in a special storage, the execution of which is initiated by the introduction of its reference instruction register.
“Payload”
The total mass that can be carried or delivered by the specified rocket system or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system that is not used to maintain flight.

Note: The particular equipment, subsystems, or components to be included in the “payload” depends on the type and configuration of the vehicle under consideration.

Technical Notes:

  • 1. Ballistic Missiles
    • “Payload” for systems with separating re-entry vehicles (RVs) includes:
      • 1. The RVs, including:
        • Dedicated guidance, navigation, and control equipment;
        • Dedicated countermeasures equipment;
      • 2. Munitions of any type (e.g. explosive or non-explosive);
      • 3. Supporting structures and deployment mechanisms for the munitions (e.g. hardware used to attach to, or separate the RV from, the bus/post-boost vehicle) that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle;
      • 4. Mechanisms and devices for safing, arming, fuzing or firing;
      • 5. Any other countermeasures equipment (e.g. decoys, jammers or chaff dispensers) that separate from the RV bus/post-boost vehicle;
      • 6. The bus/post-boost vehicle or attitude control/velocity trim module not including systems/subsystems essential to the operation of the other stages.
    • “Payload” for systems with non-separating re-entry vehicles includes:
      • 1. Munitions of any type (e.g. explosive or non-explosive);
      • 2. Supporting structures and deployment mechanisms for the munitions that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle;
      • 3. Mechanisms and devices for safing, arming, fuzing or firing;
      • 4. Any countermeasures equipment (e.g. decoys, jammers or chaff dispensers) that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle.
  • 2. Space Launch Vehicles
    “Payload” includes:
    • Spacecraft (single or multiple), including satellites;
    • Spacecraft-to-launch vehicle adapters including, if applicable, apogee/perigee kick motors or similar manoeuvering systems and separation systems.
  • 3. Sounding Rockets
    “Payload” includes:
    • Equipment required for a mission, such as data gathering, recording or transmitting devices for mission-specific data;
    • Recovery equipment (e.g. parachutes) that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle.
  • 4. Cruise Missiles
    “Payload” includes:
    • Munitions of any type (e.g. explosive or non-explosive);
    • Supporting structures and deployment mechanisms for the munitions that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle;
    • Mechanisms and devices for safing, arming, fuzing or firing;
    • Countermeasures equipment (e.g. decoys, jammers or chaff dispensers) that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle;
    • Signature alteration equipment that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle.
  • 5. Other UAVs
    “Payload” includes:
    • Munitions of any type (e.g. explosive or non-explosive);
    • Mechanisms and devices for safing, arming, fuzing or firing;
    • Countermeasures equipment (e.g. decoys, jammers or chaff dispensers) that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle;
    • Signature alteration equipment that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle;
    • Equipment required for a mission such as data gathering, recording or transmitting devices for mission-specific data and supporting structures that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle;
    • Recovery equipment (e.g. parachutes) that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle.
    • Munitions supporting structures and deployment mechanisms that can be removed without violating the structural integrity of the vehicle.
“Production”
Means all production phases such as:
  • - production engineering
  • - manufacture
  • - integration
  • - assembly (mounting)
  • - inspection
  • - testing
  • - quality assurance
“Production equipment”
Means tooling, templates, jigs, mandrels, moulds, dies, fixtures, alignment mechanisms, test equipment, other machinery and components therefor, limited to those specially designed or modified for “development” or for one or more phases of “production”.
“Production facilities”
Means “production equipment” and specially designed “software” therefor integrated into installations for “development” or for one or more phases of “production”.
“Programs”
A sequence of instructions to carry out a process in, or convertible into, a form executable by an electronic computer.
“Radiation hardened”
Means that the component or equipment is designed or rated to withstand radiation levels which meet or exceed a total irradiation dose of 5 x 105 rads (Si).
“Range”
The maximum distance that the specified rocket system or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system is capable of travelling in the mode of stable flight as measured by the projection of its trajectory over the surface of the Earth.

Technical Notes:

  • 1. The maximum capability based on the design characteristics of the system, when fully loaded with fuel or propellant, will be taken into consideration in determining “range”.
  • 2. The “range” for both rocket systems and UAV systems will be determined independently of any external factors such as operational restrictions, limitations imposed by telemetry, data links or other external constraints.
  • 3. For rocket systems, the “range” will be determined using the trajectory that maximises “range”, assuming ICAO standard atmosphere with zero wind.
  • 4. For UAV systems, the “range” will be determined for a one-way distance using the most fuel-efficient flight profile (e.g. cruise speed and altitude), assuming ICAO standard atmosphere with zero wind.
“Software”
A collection of one or more “programs”, or “microprograms”, fixed in any tangible medium of expression.
“Technology”
Means specific information which is required for the “development”, “production” or “use” of a product. The information may take the form of “technical data” or “technical assistance”.
“Technical assistance”
May take forms such as:
  • - instruction
  • - skills
  • - training
  • - working knowledge
  • - consulting services
“Technical data”
May take forms such as:
  • - blueprints
  • - plans
  • - diagrams
  • - models
  • - formulae
  • - engineering designs and specifications
  • - manuals and instructions written or recorded on other media or devices such as:
    • - disk
    • - tape
    • - read-only memories
“Use”
Means:
  • - operation
  • - installation (including on-site installation)
  • - maintenance
  • - repair
  • - overhaul
  • - refurbishing

Group 6 – Terminology

Where the following terms appear in Group 6, they are to be understood according to the explanations below:

Units, Constants, Acronyms and Abbreviations Used in Group 6
ABECAnnular Bearing Engineers Committee
ABMAAmerican Bearing Manufactures Association
ANSIAmerican National Standards Institute
Angstrom1 x 10 -10 metre
ASTMAmerican Society for Testing and Materials
barunit of pressure
°Cdegree Celsius
cccubic centimetre
CASChemical Abstracts Service
CEPCircular Error Probable or Circle of Equal Probability
dBdecibel
ggram; also, acceleration due to gravity
GHzgigahertz
GNSSGlobal Navigation Satellite System
e.g. ‘BeiDou ’
‘Galileo’
‘GLONASS’ – Global’naya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema
‘GPS’ – Global Positioning System
hhour
Hzhertz
HTPBHydroxy-Terminated Polybutadiene
ICAOInternational Civil Aviation Organisation
IEEEInstitute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers
IRInfrared
ISOInternational Organization for Standardization
Jjoule
JISJapanese Industrial Standard
KKelvin
kgkilogram
kHzkilohertz
kmkilometre
kNkilonewton
kPakilopascal
kWkilowatt
mmetre
MeVmillion electron volt or mega electron volt
MHzmegahertz
milligal10-5 m/s2 (also called mGal, mgal or milligalileo)
mmmillimetre
mm Hgmm of mercury
MPamegapascal
mradmilliradian
msmillisecond
μmmicrometre
Nnewton
Papascal
ppmparts per million
rads (Si)radiation absorbed dose
RFradio frequency
rmsroot mean square
RNSSRegional Navigation Satellite System
e.g. ‘NavIC’ – Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System
‘QZSS’– Quasi Zenith Satellite System
rpmrevolutions per minute
RVRe-entry Vehicles
ssecond
Tgglass transition temperature
TylerTyler mesh size, or Tyler standard sieve series
UAVUnmanned Aerial Vehicle
UVUltra violet
Table of Conversions Used in Group 6
Unit (from)Unit (to)Conversion
barpascal (Pa)1 bar = 100 kPa
g (gravity)m/s21 g = 9.80665 m/s2
mrad (millirad)degrees (angle)1 mrad ≈ 0.0573°
radsergs/gram of Si1 rad (Si) = 100 ergs/gram of silicon
(= 0.01 gray [Gy])
Tyler 250 meshmmFor a Tyler 250 mesh, mesh opening 0.063 mm

Group 7 - Chemical and Biological Weapons Non-Proliferation List

Notes:

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Numbers:

Chemicals are listed by name, Chemical Abstract Service (CAS) number and CWC Schedule (where applicable). Chemicals of the same structural formula (e.g., hydrates) are controlled regardless of name or CAS number. CAS numbers are shown to assist in identifying whether a particular chemical or mixture is controlled, irrespective of nomenclature. However, CAS numbers cannot be used as unique identifiers in all situations because some forms of the listed chemical have different CAS numbers, and mixtures containing a listed chemical may also have different CAS numbers.

Dual-use Chemical Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment, Chemical Weapons and Related Software and Technology

7-1. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

None

7-2. Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment

Notes:

7-2.1. Reaction Vessels, Reactors or Agitators, Storage Tanks, Containers or Receivers, Heat Exchangers or Condensers, Distillation or Absorption Columns, Valves, Multi-walled Piping, Pumps, Filling Equipment, Incinerators and prefabricated repair assemblies as follows:

7-2.2. Deleted.

N.B.:
For remotely operated filling equipment, see 7-2.1.i .

7-2.3. Deleted.

N.B.:
For incinerators, see 7-2.1.j .

7-2.4. Toxic gas monitors and monitoring systems, and their dedicated detecting components as follows: detectors; sensor devices; replaceable sensor cartridges; and dedicated software for such equipment

(Item 7-2. applies to all destinations except Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Cyprus, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States.)

7-3. CWC Materials

(All destinations applies to all 7-3 Items)

7-4. AG Materials

7-5. Software

Controls on "software" transfer only apply where specifically indicated in section 7-2 above, and do not apply to "software" which is either:

7-6. Technology

"Technology", including licences, directly associated with

This includes:

Dual-Use Biological Equipment, Biological Weapons and Related Software and Technology

7-11. Equipment, Assemblies and Components

None

7-12. Biological Test, Inspection and Production Equipment, as follows:

(Item 7-12. applies to all destinations except Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Cyprus, Romania, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom and United States.)

7-13. Materials

(All destinations applies to all 7-13 Items)

Biological Weapon Agents

7-13.1. Human Pathogens and Toxins, as follows:

7-13.2. Animal Pathogens, as follows:

7-13.3. Plant Pathogens, as follows:

Technical Note:

7-14. Software

Controls on “software” transfer only apply where specifically indicated in sections 7-12 above and 7-15, and do not apply to “software” which is either:

7-15. Technology

"Technology", including licenses, directly associated with

This includes

Notes:

Group 7 – Definitions

“Basic scientific research”
Experimental or theoretical work undertaken principally to acquire new knowledge of the fundamental principles of phenomena or observable facts, not primarily directed towards a specific practical aim or objective.
“Development”
“Development” is related to all phases before “production” such as:
  • - design
  • - design research
  • - design analysis
  • - design concepts
  • - assembly of prototypes
  • - pilot production schemes
  • - design data
  • - process of transforming design data into a product
  • - configuration design
  • - integration design
  • - layouts
 
“In the public domain”
“In the public domain”, as it applies herein, means “technology” or “software” that has been made available without restrictions upon its further dissemination. (Copyright restrictions do not remove "technology" or "software" from being "in the public domain").
“Lighter than air vehicles”
Balloons and airships that rely on hot air or on lighter-than-air gases such as helium or hydrogen for their lift.
“Microprogram”
A sequence of elementary instructions maintained in a special storage, the execution of which is initiated by the introduction of its reference instruction register.
“Production”
Means all "production" phases such as:
  • - construction
  • - production engineering
  • - manufacture
  • - integration
  • - assembly (mounting)
  • - inspection
  • - testing
  • - quality assurance
 
“Program”
A sequence of instructions to carry out a process in, or convertible into, a form executable by an electronic computer.
“Software”
A collection of one or more ‘programs’ or ‘microprograms’ fixed in any tangible medium of expression.
“Technical assistance”
May take forms, such as: instruction, skills, training, working knowledge, consulting services. “Technical assistance” includes oral forms of assistance. “Technical assistance” may involve transfer of “technical data”.
“Technical data”
May take forms such as blueprints, plans, diagrams, models, formulae, tables, engineering designs and specifications, manuals and instructions written or recorded on other media or devices such as disk, tape, read-only memories.
“Technology”
Specific information necessary for the “development”, “production” or “use” of a product. The information takes the form of “technical data” or “technical assistance”.
“UAVs”
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.
“Use”
Operation, installation (including on-site installation), maintenance (checking), repair, overhaul or refurbishing.
“VMD”
Volume Median Diameter.

Note: For water-based systems, VMD equates to MMD - the Mass Median Diameter.

Group 8 – Repealed - January 2006 (SOR/DORS/2006-16)

Group 9 – Arms Trade Treaty

(All destinations. All destinations applies to all Group 9 Items.)

The goods referred to in items 9-1. to 9-9., whether or not included elsewhere on this List, the export of which Canada has agreed to control in accordance with its obligations under the Arms Trade Treaty.

9-1.  Battle tanks that are tracked or wheeled self-propelled armoured fighting vehicles weighing at least 16.5 t unladen, with a direct fire main gun of at least 75 mm calibre.

9-2.  Armoured combat vehicles as follows:

9-3.  Large-calibre artillery systems as follows:

9-4.   Military aircraft and related systems as follows:

9-5.   Military helicopters and related systems as follows:

9-6.  Vessels and submarines that are armed and equipped for military use and that

9-7.  Missiles and missile launchers

9-8.  Small arms

9-9.   Light weapons

Index

This non-exhaustive index is provided as a guide only.

class="table table-bordered"
Index (provided as a guide only)
A to D converters1-3.A.,
1-4.A.,
6-14.A.
Absorbers, hair type1-1.C.
Absorbers of electromagnetic waves1-1.C.
Absorption analyzers3-2.6.
Absorption columns7-2.1
Accelerators3-2.5.8. & 9.,
2-19., 4-5.B.,
6-15.B.
Accelerometers1-7.A., 6-9.A
Acoustic detection systems1-6.A.
Acoustic-optic devices1-3.A.
Acoustic projectors1-6.A
Acoustic seabed survey equipment1-6.A.
Acoustic sensors1-6.A.
Acoustic systems1-6.A.
Acoustic vibration test equipment1-9.B
Acoustic wave devices1-3.A
Additives, explosives2-8, 6-4.C.
Adjusted Peak Performance (APP)1-4.A.,
1-4.D.,
1-4.E.
Aero-engines1-9.A.
2-10., 6-3.A.
Aerodynamic analysis6-16.
Aerodynamic enrichment3-2.5.5.
Aerodynamic testing facilities6-15.B.2.
Aerothermodynamic test facilities6-15.B.6.
Aerosol dispensing UAV6-19.A.3.
Aerosol inhalation equipment7-12.8.
Agitators7-2.1.
Aiming devices2-1., 2-2., 2-5.
Air-independent power systems1-8.A., 2-9.
Airborne refuelling2-10.
Aircraft2-10.
Aircraft handling equipment2-10.
Airships1-9.A., 2-10
All wheel drive vehicles2-6.
Alloyed materials1-1.C.
Altimeters1-7.A.,
6-11.A.
Aluminum alloys1-1.C.,
4-2.C.
Aluminum powder2-8., 6-4.C.
Ammonia convertors, crackers, towers4-4.B., 3-2.6.
Ammonium perchlorate2-8., 6-4.C.
Ammunition2-3.
Amphibious vehicles2-6.
Analog computers6-13.A.
Analog to digital converters1-3.A.,
6-14.A.
Analogue instrumentation recorders1-3.A.
Analyzers, digital differential (DDA)6-13.A.
Analyzers, network1-3.A.
Anechoic chambers6-15.B
Angular measuring instruments4-1.B.
Animal pathogens7-13.2.
Antibodies2-7.
Anti-g suits2-10.
Anti-personnel mines5503., 2-4
Apparel goods5209.
Armament, large calibre2-2.
Armed vehicles2-6.
Armoured combat vehicles9-2.
Armoured plate2-13.
Armoured vehicles2-6.
Arms, small2-1.
Aromatic polyamide-imides1-1.C.
Aromatic polyetherimides1-1.C.
Artillery2-2.
Attitude control equipment1-9.A., 6-10.A.2.
Attitude and orbit control1-9.A., 5504.
Atomic frequency standards1-3.A.
Authentication1-5.A.2.
Automatic firearms2-1.
Automatic piloting systems2-10.
Automatic pilots1-7.A.,
6-9.A.
Avionics1-7., 6-11.
Avionics equipment, rockets6-11.
Bacteria, human, animal, plant7-13.
Balancing machines4-3.B.3.,
6-9.B.2.
Ballistic missile systems6-1.A.1.
Ballistic protection, materials for1-1.A., 2-13.
Banking equipment1-5.A.2.
Batch mixers6-4.B.3.
Bathymetric survey systems1-6.A.
Battle tank9-1.
Bearing, silent2-9.
Bearings1-2.A.,
6-3.A.7.
BeiDou receivers6-11.A.
Bellows3-2.5.1., 4-3.A.9,
4-3.B.
Beryllium1-1.C., 1-2.A.,
1-6.C., 2-8.,
4-2.C.,
6-4.C.
Beryllium substrate blanks1-6.C.
Binary precursors2-7.
Biocatalysts2-7.
Biological agents2-7.,7-13.
Biological containment facilities7-12.
Biological protective/containment equipment7-12.
Biological safety cabinets7-12-7.
Biological systems2-7., 7-13.
Biological test equipment7-12.
Biological Weapons (BW)2-7., 7-13.
Biological weapons agents7-13.
Biopolymers2-7.
Bismaleimides1-1.C.
Bismuth2-8., 4-2.C.,
6-4.C.
Blast/thermal protection6-18.
Blinding laser weapons2-19., 5501.
Blowers3-2.5., 3-2.6.
Body armour1-1.A., 2-13.
Bombing, computers2-5.
Bombs2-4.
Bonding systems1-9.B.
Boron and boron compounds1-1.C., 2-8.,
4-2.C.,
6-4.C.
Breathing equipment1-1.A.,1-8.A.,
2-7., 2-10., 2-17.
Bulk graphite6-6.C.3
Burning rate modifier6-4.C.
C3I, C4I software2-21
Cable, secure communications1-5.A.
Cables, fibre optic1-5.A.1.,
1-6.C.,
1-8.A.
Cadmium telluride (CdTe)1-6.C.
Cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe)1-6.C.
Calcium (high purity)3-2.7.2.,
4-2.C.5.
Cameras1-6.A., 1-8.A.,
4-5.B.
Cameras, military2-15.
Cameras, reconnaissance2-15.
Cannon2-2.
Capacitors1-3.A.,
4-6.A.4.
Carbines2-1.
Carbon-carbon materials1-9.A.,
6-6.C.
Carbon catalysts4-6.A.
Carbon fibres1-1.C., 4-2.C.
Cartridges2-3., 2-4.
Casting equipment1-9.B., 2-18.
Castings, military2-16.
Cat food5208
Catalysts4-2.A.2.,
6-4.C.
Catalytic burners3-2.6.7.
Catch-all5505.
Cedar, red5103.
Cells1-3.A.1.
Cellular communications equipment1-5.A.1.,
1-5.A.2.
Centrifuges3-2.5., 6-9.B.
Centrifugal blowers3-2.6.2.
Centrifugal multiplane balancing machines4-3.B.3.
Centrifugal separators7-12.3.
Centrifuges, gas3-2.5.1. & 2.
Ceramic1-1.C.,
1-9.B.
Ceramic cores1-9.B.
Ceramic materials1-1.C.,
3-2.5.3.,
6-6.C.
Ceramic powder1-1.C.
Ceramic shells1-9.B.
Chambers, anechoic6-15.B.4.
Chambers, environmental6-15.B.4.
Chemical agents2-7., 7-3.
Chemical exchange enrichment units3-2.5.
Chemical for propellants2-8., 6-4.C.
Chemical production equipment7-2., 7-12.
Chemical vapour deposition furnace6-6.B.
Chemical vapour deposition1-2.B., 1-2.E.,
1-3.B.,
6-6.B.4.
Chemical warfare2-7., 7.
Chemical weapon agent precursors2-7., 7-3.,
7-4.
Chemical Weapons (CW)2-7., 7-3.
Chemical weapons facilities7-2.
Chemical weapons production equipment7-2.
CW, BW dissemination equipment2-7., 7-12.
CW, BW protective equipment1-1.A., 2-7.
CWC scheduled chemicals7-3.
Chemiluminescent compounds5504.
Chlorine trifluoride (ClF3)2-8.,
3-2.7.1.2.,
4-2.C.6.
Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC’s)1-1.C.
Chocolate preparations5206
Closed-cycle refrigeration1-9.A.
Coating machines1-2.B.
Combat vessels2-9.
Combined cycle engines1-9.A.,
6-3.A.2.
Combustion chamber6-3.A.
Command and telemetry data handling1-9.A., 5504.
Compasses1-7.A., 6-9.A.
Components, nuclear3-1.
Composite propellants2-8., 6-4.C.
Composite structures1-1.A., 3-2.5.,
4-2.A.3.,
6-6.A.
Composites1-1.B.,
1-1.C.,
4-2.C., 6-6.A.
Compressors1-9.A., 1-9.E.,
3-2.5.
Computers1-4.A., 2-11.,
6-13.A.
Condensers7-2.1
Conductive polymers1-1.C.
Containers, chemical7-2.
Containers, military2-17.
Containment facilities and equipment7-12.
Continuous mixers2-18., 6-4.B.
Contouring machine tools1-2.B., 4-1.B.
Control systems1-9.B.,
6-3.A.
Converters, A to D1-3.A., 1-4.A.,
6-14.A.
Cooled mirrors1-6.A.
Copolymers1-1.C.
Counter measure equipment2-4., 2-5.,
2-11.,
2-15,
2-19.
Counter-counter measure equipment2-11.
Crash helmets, military2-10., 2-13.
Critically safe tanks3-2.3.2.
Crucibles3-2.3., 3-2.5.,
3-2.7., 4-2.A.
Cruise missile systems6-1.A.2.,
6-19.A.2.
Cryocoolers1-6.A.
Cryogenic distillation columns4-4.B.2.
Cryogenic equipment2-20.
Cryogenic systems1-9.A.
Cryptography1-5.A.2.,
1-5.D.2.,
2-11.
Cryptanalytic equipment1-5.A.4.
Curing agent6-3.C.
Cutting machines1-2.B., 2-18.,
4-1.B.
Cutting tool1-2.B.
CVD equipment1-2.B.,
1-3.B.,
6-6.B.
Damping fluids1-1.C.
Data acquisition1-9.B.
Data processing security equipment1-5.A.2,
2-11.
Decladding equipment and
chopping machines
3-2.3.1.
Decontamination equipment1-1.A., 2-7.
Decryption equipment1-5.A.2,
2-11.
Deep-hole drilling machine tools1-2.B.
Demolition charges2-4.
Depth charges2-4.
Design integration software6-16.D.
Deformable mirriors1-6.A.
Detection devices, underwater1-6.A., 2-9.
Detection equipment1-1.A., 2-5., 7-2.
Detectors1-1.A., 1-6.A.
Detonators1-1.A., 4-6.A.1.
Detonation Engines6-3.A.2.
Deuterium3-2.2.,
4-6.A.5.
Deuterium production plant3-2.2.,
4-6.A.5.
Diamond-like-carbon1-2.E.
Diffuser housings3-2.5.3.2.
Diffusion barriers, gaseous3-2.5.3.1.
Diffusion bonding1-1.B.
Digital computers1-4.A.,
1-4.E.,
6-13.A.
Digital Differential Analyzers (DDA)6-13.A.
Digital forensic tools1-4.A
Digital instrumentation recorders1-3.A.
Digital signatures1-5.A.2.
Digital-to-analog converters1-3.A., 1-4.A.
Digital video recorders1-6.A.
Dimensional inspection equipment1-2.B.,
4-1.B.
Direct digital synthesizer1-3.A.
Directed energy weapons2-19.
Direction finding equipment1-5.A.1.,
6-9.A.,
6-11.A.
Disruptor1-1.A.,
2-4.
Dissolvers3-2.3.2.
Distillation columns4-4.B., 7-2.1.
Diver deterrent systems1-8.A.
Diving apparatus1-8.A., 2-17.
Diving, underwater swimming equipment1-8.A., 2-17.
Dog food5208
Drones, reconnaissance1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-1.A.,
6-19.A.
Drones, target1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-1.A., 6-19.A.
Dynamic adaptive routing1-5.D.
ECM2-11.
EEPROMs1-3.A.
Electrical Discharge Machines (EDM)1-2.B.,
4-1.B.2.
Electro Optic Modulator1-3.A
Electrolytic cells, fluorine production4-3.B
Electromagnetic energy storage1-3.A.
Electromagnetic enrichment plants3-2.5.9.
Electromagnetic propulsion2-12.
Electromagnets, superconductive1-3.A.,
4-3.A.4.
Electron beam furnaces4-1.B.7.
Electron beam guns4-1.B.7.
Electron beam machine tools1-2.B.
Electronic counter-counter measure equipment2-11.
Electronic counter measure equipment2-11.
Electronic devices, superconductive1-3.A., 2-20
Electronic equipment military2-11.
Electronic framing cameras1-6.A.,
4-5.B.4.
Electronic monitoring systems2-11.
Electronic surveillance systems2-11.
Electronic streak cameras1-6.A.,
4-5.B.4.
Electronic switching devices4-6.A.
EMI technology1-5.E.2.,
6-11.E.
EMP1-5.A.
EMP protection6-18.
EMP technology6-11.E.
Encryption equipment1-5.A.2., 2-11.
End-effectors1-2.B., 2-17.,
4-1.A.3.
Engine controls, full authority digital1-7.E., 1-9.D.,
1-9.E.
Engines1-9.A., 6-3.A.
Engines for military aircraft2-10.
Engines for military vehicles2-6.
Engines for military vessels2-9.
Enrichment plants3-2.5.
Environmental chambers6-15.B.4.
Enzymes for BW, CW2-7., 7-13.
Equipment for epitaxial growth1-3.B.
Equipment for ion implantation1-3.B.
Equipment for signal processing or  image enhancement1-4.A.
Equipment for use with nuclear reactors3-2.1.
Exchange towers3-2.6.
Explosive containment devices4-5.B.7.
Explosives2-8., 4-1.A.3.,
4-6.C., 6-4.C.
External thermal shields3-2.1.11.
Extractors, solvent3-2.6.1.
FADEC1-7.E., 1-9.D.,
1-9.E.
Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processors1-3.A.
Fermenters for BW agents7-12.
Fibre optic cable and accessories1-5.A.1.,
1-6.A.1.
Fibre optic hull penetrators1-8.A.
Fibre/Tow placement machines6-6.B.
Fibres1-1.C., 1-5.A.,
1-6.C.
Fibrous & filamentary material1-1.C., 4-2.C.,
4-3.B., 6-6.C.
Field engineer equipment2-17.
Field programmable gate arrays1-3.A.
Field programmable logic arrays1-3.A.
Filament winding machines1-1.B., 4-3.B.,
6-6.B.
Filling equipment, remotely operated7-2.
Filters, tunable1-3.A.
Filtration equipment7-12.
Fire bombs2-4.
Fire control equipment2-5.
Firearms2-1., 2-2.
Firearms, magazines2-1., 2-2.
Firearms, components2-1., 2-2.
Fissionable materials3-1.1.
Flak suits2-13.
Flame throwers2-2.
Flash X-ray equipment4-5.B.
Flight control systems1-7., 6-2.A.,
6-10.A.
Flight control systems, rockets6-10.A.
Flotation fluids1-1.C.
Flow-forming machines1-2.B., 4-1.B.,
6-3.B.
Fluid energy mills6-4.B.
Fluorinated compounds1-1.A., 1-1.C.
Fluorination systems3-2.5.7.9.
Fluorine production equipment4-3.B.
Fluoropolymers1-1.A., 1-1.C.
Fly-by-light systems6-10.A.
Fly-by-wire systems6-10.A.
Fly cutting machines1-2.B.
Focal plane array detectors1-6.A.
Fogging systems7-12.9.
Food products5201., 5203.,
5204
Forest products5101., 5102.,
5103., 5104.
Forgings2-16.
Freeze-drying equipment7-12.
Frequency agile tubes2-11.
Frequency changers, convertors, invertors3-2.5.2.4.,
4-3.A.1.
Frequency hopping radio1-5.A.1.,
1-5.A.2.
Frequency standards, atomic1-3.A.
Frequency synthesiser1-3.A.
Fuel bladders1-1.A.
Fuel element fabrication plant3-2.4.
Fuel fabrication plants3-2.4.
Fuel thickeners2-8.
Fueling machines, nuclear3-2.1.
Fuels2-8., 6-4.C.3.
Full Authority Digital Engine Control  (FADEC)1-7.E., 1-9.D.,
1-9.E.
Fungi7-13.
Furnaces3-2.7., 4-1.B.7.
Furnaces, chemical vapour deposition1-2.B.,
6-6.B.4.
Fusion Reactors5502
Galileo GNSS receivers1-7.A., 2-11.,
5504., 6-11.A.
G-suit2-10.
Gas centrifuges3-2.5.1.
Gas masks1-1.A., 2-7.
Gas monitors7-2.4.
Gas projectors2-2.
Gas turbine blade production equipment1-9.B.
Gas turbine engines1-9.A., 6-3.A.,
6-5.A.
Gas turbine marine engines1-8.A., 1-9.A.
Gaseous diffusion enrichment3-2.5.3.,
3-2.5.4.
Gaskets1-1.A.
Gate arrays1-3.A.
Gel propellant6-3.A.2., 6-4.C.7.
Gel propellant rocket motors6-2.A.1., 6-20.A.1.
Gel propellant tanks6-3.A.8.
Generators, military2-17.
Genetic elements7-13.
Genetically modified micro-organisms7-13.
Gimbals1-6.A.
Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers1-7.A., 2-11.,
5504., 6-11.A.
Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers1-7.A., 2-11.,
5504., 6-11.A.
GLONASS receivers1-7.A., 2-11.,
5504., 6-11.A.
Goods in transit5401
Graphics accelerators1-4.A.
Graphite3-2.2.2., 3-2.5.9.,
6-6.C.3.
Gravimeter production equipment1-6.B.
Gravity gradiometers1-6.A.,
6-12.A.3.
Gravity meters1-6.A.,
6-12.A.3.
Grenades2-4.
Grinding machines1-2.B., 4-1.B.
Guidance and navigation equipment1-7.A., 2-11.,
6-2.A., 6-9.A.
Gun-carriers2-6.
Gun laying equipment2-5.
Guns2-1., 2-2.
Guns, self-propelled2-6.
Gyro-astro compasses1-7.A., 6-9.A.
Gyros1-7.A., 6-9.A.
Gyrostabilisers6-9.A.
Hafnium3-2.1.6.,
4-2.A.& C.
Hair type absorbers1-1.C.
Half-tracks2-6.
Header piping3-2.5.
Heat exchangers3-2.1.9., 3-2.5.,
7-2.
Heat shields3-2.1.11., 6-2.A.,
6-6.A.
Heavy water 3-2.2., 3-2.6.,
4-2.A., 4-4.A.
Height finders1-6.A., 2-5.
Helicopters2-10.
Helium4-2.B.1.,
4-2.C.
Helium refrigeration4-2.B.
Helmets, military2-13.
Hetero-epitaxial materials1-3.C.
High energy density propellants2-8., 6-4.C.
High energy storage capacitors1-3.A., 4-6.A.
High power D.C. supplies4-3.A.
High power radio-frequency systems2-19.
High pressure thrust chambers1-9.A.
High sugar containing products5205
High voltage power supplies3-2.5.9.2.,
4-3.A.
HMX2-8., 4-6.C.,
6-4.C.
Hot isostatic presses1-2.B., 4-1.B.,
6-6.B.
Housings, diffuser3-2.5.3.2.
Howitzers2-2.
Hull penetrators and connectors1-8.A., 2-9.
Hulls2-9.
Human pathogens7-13.1.
Hybrid computers6-16.A.
Hybrid rocket motors6-2.A.1.,
6-3.A.6.,
6-20.A.1.
Hydrodynamic instrumentation4-5.B.
Hydrogen storage1-9.A.
Hydrophones1-6.A.
Identification equipment2-5., 2-11.
Image enhancement, equipment for1-4.A.
Image intensifier tubes1-6.A., 2-15.
Image intensifiers1-6.A., 2-15.
Imaging equipment1-6.A., 2-15.
Imaging radar sensors1-6.A., 2-12.
Implosion systems4-5.B.
Improvised explosive device disruptors1-1.A., 2-4.
Imprint lithography equipment1-3.B.1.
Incendiary bombs2-4.
Incinerators7-2.3.
Indicator heads6-9.B.2.
Induction furnaces4-1.B.4.
Inertial equipment for azimuth, heading or north pointing1-7.A., 6-9.A.
Inertial equipment test equipment1-7.B., 6-9.B.
Inertial navigation systems1-7.A.,
6-9.A.3.
Information security1-5.A.2., 2-11.
Infrared equipment1-6.A., 2-15.
Infrared imaging equipment1-6.A., 2-15.
Initiation systems, multipoint1-1.A., 4-6.A.
Inspection equipment, dimensional1-2.B., 4-1.B.
Insulation1-9.A.,
6-3.A.3.
Integrated circuits1-3.A.
Integrated flight instrument systems1-7.A.,
6-9.A.1.
Integrated navigation systems1-7.A., 6-9.A.7.
Intercept equipment1-5.A.1., 2-11.
Interferometers1-2.B., 4-5.B.5.,
6-11.A.
Interlacing machines1-1.B.,
6-6.B.1.
Intrusion Software1-4.D.4.
Intrusion Systems1-4.A.5.
IP network communication surveillance systems1-5.A.1.j.
Ion beam systems1-3.B.
Ion exchange enrichment plants3-2.5.6.
Ion implantation equipment1-3.B.
Ion plating equipment1-2.B.
Iron powder2-8.
Irradiated fuel processing plants3-2.3.
Isolators (biological)7.12.7.
Isostatic presses1-2.B.,
4-1.B.5.,
6-6.B.3.
Isotope separation equipment3-2.5.6.5., 4-3.
Isotope separation plants3-2.5.6.4.,
4-3.A.
Isotope separators3-2.5.9.1.,
4-3.B.5.
Jamming equipment1-5.A.1., 2-4.,
2-11.
Joule-Thomson minicoolers1-6.A.
Kinetic energy weapons2-12.
Key management1-5.A.2.
Large calibre armaments2-2.
Large-calibre artillery systems9-3.
Lasers1-6.A., 2-19.,
3-2.5.7.13.,
4-3.A.2., 5501.
Laser acoustic detection equipment1-6.A.
Laser based enrichment plants3-2.5.
Laser diagnostic equipment1-6.A.
Laser diodes1-6.A.
Laser inspection equipment1-2.B., 1-6.B.
Laser microphone1-6.A.
Laser production equipment1-6.B.
Laser protection equipment2-17.
Laser radar1-6.A., 6-11.A.
Laser test equipment1-6.B.
Launch support equipment6-12.A.
Launch support software6-12.D.
Launch vehicles1-9.A., 5504.,
6-1.A.
Light weapons9-9.
Lighter than air vehicles1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-1.A.2.,
6-19.A.2.
Linear accelerometers1-7.A., 6-9.A.
Linear displacement measuring equipment1-2.B., 4-1.B.
Liquid fit machine tools1-2.B.
Liquid fuels2-8., 6-4.C.
Liquid propellant tanks6-3.A.8.
Lithium; production & separation4-2.C.
Lithium isotope separation equipment4-2.B.
Lithography equipment1-3.B.
Logic arrays1-3.A.
Logs5101
Lumber5104
Lubricating materials1-1.C.
Machine header piping systems3-2.5.2.
Machine guns2-1.
Machine tools1-2.B.,
4-1.B.2.
Magnesium1-1.C., 2-8.,
4-2.B.2.
Magnesium alloys1-1.C., 2-8.,
4-2.C., 6-4.C.
Magnesium powder2-8., 6-4.C.
Magnet power supplies3-2.5.9., 5502
Magnetic and electric field sensors1-6.A.6., 1-6.B.,
1-6.C., 1-6.D.,
1-6.E.
Magnetic compensation systems1-6.A.
Magnetic metals1-1.C.
Magnetometers1-6.A.
Maintenance, military2-18.
Mandrels4-1.B.,
6-6.B.1.
Manipulators, remote3-2.7.2., 4-1.A.
MANPADS9-7.
Maraging steels4-2.C.,
6-6.C.8.
Marine gas turbine engine1-8.A., 1-9.A.
Masks or reticles1-3.B., 1-6.B.
Mass spectrometers3-2.5., 4-3.B.6.
Measuring equipment1-2.B., 1-9.B.,
4-1.B.
Measuring equipment, Dynamic Wavefront1-6.A
Metal alloys1-1.C., 4-2.C.,
6-6.C.
Metal in semi-fabricated forms1-1.C., 4-2.C.,
6-6.C.
Metal in crude forms1-1.C., 4-2.C.,
6-6.C.
Metal powders1-1.C., 4-2.C.,
6-6.C.
Micro-organisms2-7., 7-13.
Microchannel plates1-6.A., 2-15.
Microcomputer1-3.A.
Micro-electronic Circuits1-3.A., 5504.
Microprocessor1-3.A., 5504
Microwave assemblies & modules1-3.A.
Microwave integrated circuits1-3.A.
Microwave or millimetre wave devices1-3.A.
Microwave Radio Frequency Systems1-3.A., 5502.
Microwave solid state amplifiers1-3.A.
Microwave power1-3.A., 3-2.5.,
4-5.B.1.
Microwave power modules1-3.A.1.
Microwave test receivers1-3.A.
Microwave transistors1-3.A.
Microwave transmission equipment1-5.A.1.
Microwave weapon systems2-19.
Military aircraft9-4.
Military helicopters9-5.
Military nuclear reactors2-17., 3-2.1.
Milling machines1-2.B.,
4-1.B.2.
Mines2-4., 5503.
Mines, cables for sweeping2-4.
Mirrors, cooled1-6.A.
Missile guidance equipment2-4., 2-11., 6-9.A.
Missile launchers9-7.
Missile radomes2-4., 6-18.
Missile tracking equipment2-5., 6-12.A.
Missiles9-7.
Missiles, guided or unguided2-4., 6-1.A.,
6-19.A.
Mixers, batch6-4.B.3.
Mobile repair shops2-17.
Modeling software2-21., 6-16.D.
Molasses5204
Molybdenum6-6.C.7.
Monitoring systems, military, electronic2-11.
Mortars2-2.
Motion simulators6-9.B.2.
Motor cases1-9.A.
Motors, submarine1-8.A., 2-9.
Moulds1-1.B., 1-2.B.,
6-6.B.1.
Multiple seal valves7-2.1.
Multispectral imaging sensors1-6.A.
Naval equipment2-9.
Navigation, equipment and systems1-7, 1-8.A.,
6-9.A.
Neptunium1-1.C.
Network access controllers1-4.A.
Network analyzers1-3.A.
Neural computers1-4.A.
Neural network integrated circuits1-3.A.
Neutron detection and measurement instruments3-2.1.
Neutron generator systems4-6.A.5.
Nickel1-1.C.
Nickel powder1-1.C., 3-2.5.,
4-2.C.16.
Nickel powder, high purity4-2.C.
Night sighting equipment1-6.A., 2-5.,
2-15.
Niobium alloys1-1.C.
Nitrate esters6-4.C.
Nitrate plasticiser6-4.C.
Noise reduction systems1-8.A., 2-17., 6-17.
Nozzles1-9.A., 2-4., 2-10., 6-3.A., 6-6.A.
Nuclear, biological, chemical detection systems1-1.A., 2-7.
Nuclear Dual-use Substances4-2.C.
Nuclear Dual-use Industrial Equipment 4-1.A.
Nuclear Fuel Cladding3-2.1.6.
Nuclear fusion5502
Nuclear pressure vessels3-2.1.
Nuclear reactors2-9, 2-17., 3-2.1., 5502.
Nuclear steam generators3-2.1.
Nuclear testing equipment4-5.A.
Nuclear Weapons Design/Test Equipment5504
Nucleic acid assemblers and synthesizers7-2.1.10.
Numerical control units4-1.B.,
6-3.B.3.
Numerically controlled machine tools1-2.B., 4-1.B.
Object detection location1-6.A.
Ocean salvage system1-8.A.
Optical absorption material1-6.C.
Optical computers1-4.A.
Optical control equipment1-6.A.
Optical detectors1-6.A.
Optical fibre1-5.A.1.,
1-6.A., 1-6.C.
Optical fibre cables1-5.A.1.,
1-6.A., 1-6.C.
Optical fibre connectors1-8.A., 2-9.
Optical filters1-6.A.
Optical material1-6.C.
Optical mirrors1-6.A.
Optical sensing fibre1-6.A.
Optical sensors1-6.A.
Optical switching1-5.B., 1-5.D.,
1-5.E.
Oscillators1-3.A., 1-6.A.,
4-3.A.2.
Oxidiser substances2-8., 6-4.C.4.
Packings for water separation4-4.A.
Parachutes2-10.
Particle beam systems2-19.
Passive coherent location systems1-5.A.1.
Passive systems, acoustic1-6.A.
Pathogens, human, animal, plant7-13.
Payload data handling1-9.A., 5504.
Payloads, spacecraft1-9.A., 5504.
Peanut butter5201
Phased array antennae1-5.A.1.,
1-6.A.
Phased segment mirrors1-6.A.
Photocathodes1-6.A.
Photodiodes, semiconductor1-6.A.
Photographic equipment1-6.A., 1-8.A.,
2-15., 4-2.B.,
4-5.B.
Photomultiplier tubes1-6.A., 4-5.A.1.
Photovoltaic arrays1-3.A.
Piezoelectric polymers1-1.A., 1-1.C.
Pilot pressure suits2-10.
Piloting systems, automatic2-10.
Piping, multiwalled7-2.1.
Piping systems3-2.5.
Pistols2-1.
Plant pathogens7-13.
Plants for conversion of plutonium nitrate3-2.3.
Plants for fabrication of fuel elements3-2.4.
Plants for processing irradiated  nuclear materials3-2.3.
Plants for processing of  fissionable materials3-2.3.
Plants for production of plutonium metal3-2.3.
Plants for reprocessing  reactor fuel elements3-2.3.
Plants for separation of  fissionable materials3-2.3.
Plants for the separation of isotopes3-2.5.
Plants for the production of (UF6)3-2.5.
Plants for the production of heavy water,  deuterium3-2.6.
Plasma dry etching equipment1-3.B.
Plasma furnaces4-1.B.
Plasma generation systems3-2.5.8.3.
Plasma propulsion2-12.
Plasma separation enrichment3-2.5.8.
Plasma spraying equipment1-2.B.
Plasma torches4-1.B.7.
Plantinised Catalysts4-2.A.
Plutonium1-1.C., 3-1.
Plutonium Conversion Plants3-2.7.
Plutonium nitrate3-2.3.
Plutonium oxide3-2.7.
Poloidal Field Coils 5502
Polyamide-imides, aromatic1-1.C.
Polyarylene ketones1-1.C.
Polycarbosilazanes1-1.C.
Polycrystalline substrate1-3.C.
Polyetherimides, aromatic1-1.C.
Polydiorganosilanes1-1.C.
Polyimides, aromatic1-1.C.
Polymeric substances1-1.A., 1-1.C.,
6-4.C.5.
Polymers1-1.C.,
Polymers, conductive1-1.C.
Polysilazanes1-1.C.
Position encoders1-3.A.
Position finders2-5.
Positioning tables6-9.B.2.
Potassium titanyl arsenate (KTA)1-6.C.
Power generating systems, nuclear reactor3-2.1.
Power supplies, direct current, high power3-2.5., 4-3.A.,
5502
Precursors, chemical2-7., 7-3., 7-4.
Precursors, explosives2-8.
Preform production equipment1-1.B., 6-6.B.
Preforms1-1.C., 6-6.
Prepreg production equipment1-1.B., 6-6.B.
Prepegs1-1.C., 4-2.A.,
6-6.
Presses, hot isostatic1-2.B., 4-1.B.,
6-6.B.
Pressure measuring instruments4-3.A.
Pressure refuellers2-10.
Pressure suits2-10.
Pressure transducers4-3.A.7.
Primary cells1-3.A.
Process technology, chemical7-6.
Process technology, biological7-15.
Processed foods5207
Production equipment, aero engines1-9.B., 6-3.B.
Production equipment, direction finding2-18., 6-9.B.
Production equipment, flight control1-7.B., 6-10.A.
Production equipment, gas turbines1-9.B., 6-3.B.
Production equipment, military2-18.
Production equipment, missiles, rockets and UAVs2-18., 6-2.B.,
6-20.B.
Production equipment, navigation1-7.A., 6-9.B.
Production equipment, propellant2-18., 6-4.B.
Production equipment, propulsion1-9.B., 6-3.B.
Production equipment,  structural composites1-1.B., 6-6.B.
Production equipment, telecommunications1-5.B.
Production facilities, aero engines1-9.B., 6-3.B.
Production facilities, missiles, rockets  and UAVs2-18., 6-2.B.,
6-20.B.
Production facilities, propulsion1-9.B., 6-3.B.
Production technology, military2-22.
Profilometer1-7.B., 6-9.B.
Prohibited weapons2-1., 2-2.
Projectile launchers2-2.
Projection telescopes1-6.A.
Projectors, acoustic1-6.A.
Propellant additives and agents2-8., 6-4.C.
Propellant production equipment2-18., 6-4.B.
Propellants2-8., 6-4.C.
Propellers1-8.A.
Propulsion equipment, nuclear2-17., 3-2.1.
Propulsion inspection equipment1-9.B.
Propulsion production equipment1-9.B.
Propulsion systems/Equipment1-8.A., 1-9.A.,
5504., 6-3.A.
Propulsion test equipment1-9.B., 6-3.A.
Propulsive substances2-8., 6-4.C.
Protective clothing1-1.A., 2-7.,
2-13., 7-12.
Pulpwood5102
Pulse generators, high speed4-5.B.
Pulse jet6-3.A.2.
Pulsers4-6.A.
Pumps1-9.A., 3-2.1,
3-2.5., 3-2.6.,
4-2.B., 4-3., 4-4.,
6-3.A., 7-2.1.
Pyrolytic equipment6-6.B.
Pyrotechnic flare signals2-3., 2-4.
Pyrotechnic projectors2-2.
Pyrotechnics2-8.
Quantum cryptography1-5.A.2.
Quartz heaters1-9.B.
Radar1-6.A., 2-11.,
6-9.A., 6-11.A.,
6-12.A.
Radar cross section measurement systems1-6.B., 6-17.B.
Radar reflectivity material1-1.A., 1-1.C.,
6-17.B.
Radial ball bearings6-3.A.7.
Radiation hardened computer equipment1-4.A.
Radiation hardened microcircuit1-3.A., 5504,
6-18.A.
Radiation hardened telecommunication equipment1-5.A.1.
Radiation hardened TV cameras4-1.A.
Radiation shielding windows4-1.A.
Radio direction finding equipment1-5.A.1.
Radio equipment1-5.A.1., 2-11.
Radio receivers1-5.A.1., 2-11.
Radioactive agents2-7., 3-1.2.
Radiographic equipment6-15.A.
Radionuclides4-2.C.19.
Radium-2264-2.C.12.
Radomes6-C.5.,
6-18.A.
Ramjet engines1-9.A., 6-3.A.
Range finders2-5.
Rate tables6-9.B.2.
RDX2-8., 4-6.C.,
6-4.C.4.
Re-entry vehicle nose tips1-9.A., 6-6.B.5.
Re-entry vehicles6-2.A.
Reaction vessels7-2.1.
Reactive materials2-8.
Reactors, chemical7-2.1.
Reactors, nuclear2-17., 3-2.1.,
5502
Reactors, synthesis4-4.B.
Read-out integrated circuits (ROIC)1-6.A.
Rechargeable cells1-3.A.
Reconnaissance drones1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-1.A., 6-19.A.
Recorders, data1-3.A.
Recovery vehicles2-6.
Reduced observable6-17.A.
Reduced observables, materials for1-1.C., 2-17.,
6-17.C.
Reduced radar reflectivity6-17.
Reflectance measuring equipment1-6.B., 6-17.B.
Reflux systems3-2.5.
Refrigeration systems1-9.A.
Refuelling2-10.
Regional Navigation Satellite Systems (RNSS)6-11.A.
Remote manipulators4-1.A.4.
Remotely Operated Vehicles1-1.A.C.
Remotely piloted air vehicles1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-1.A.,
6-19.A.
Repair shops, mobile2-17.
Reprocessing plants3-2.3.
Resins1-1.C.,
3-2.5.6.6
Revolvers2-1.
Rhenium and Rhenium alloys4-2.C.20.
Rickettsiae7-13.
Rifles2-1., 2-2.
Riot control agents 2-7.
Robots1-2.B., 1-8.A.,
2-17., 4-1.A.3.
Rocket engines2-4., 6-2.A.,
6-20.A.
Rocket launchers2-2.
Rocket motors2-4., 6-2.A.,
6-3.A., 6-20.A.
Rocket motor cases2-4., 6-3.A..
6-3.C.
Rocket propulsion systems1-9.A., 2-4.,
6-2.A.
Rocket stages2-4., 6-2.A.,
6-20.A.
Rocket subsystems2-4., 6-2.A.,
6-20.A.
Rocket systems2-4., 6-1.A.,
6-19.A.
Rockets2-4., 6-1.A.,
6-19.A., 6-20.A.
Rotor production 1-9.B., 4-3.B.
Routers1-5.A.2.
Satellite1-9.A., 2-11.,
5504
Satellite Navigation System receivers1-7.A., 2-11.,
5504., 6-11.A.
Scatterometers6-9.A.
Scrambling equipment1-5.A.2., 2-11.
Scramjet engines1-9.A., 6-3.A.
Sealants1-1.A.
Seals1-1.A.,
3-2.5.3.,
3-2.5.5.
Security equipment1-5.A.2., 2-11.
Self-propelled guns2-6.
Semiconductor lasers1-6.A.
Semiconductor lasers arrays1-6.A.
Semiconductor photodiodes1-6.A.
Sensors integration equipment2-5.
Sensors1-6.A.
Separation equipment, gas3-2.5.
Separation mechanisms6-3.A.
Separators7-12.3.
Servo valves6-3.A., 6-10.A.
Shared aperture optical elements2-19.
Shielding technology1-5.E., 6-11.E.
Shock tunnel6-15.B.2.
Shotguns2-1.
Sighting devices2-1., 2-2., 2-5.
Signal analyzers1-3.A.
Signal processing1-4.A.,
1-5.A.1.
Signature suppression2-17., 6-17.
Silencers, firearm2-1.
Silicon carbide substrate blanks1-6.C.
Silicon carbide wafers1-3.C.
Silver gallium selenide1-6.C.
Simulation software2-21., 6-16.D.
Simulators1-9.A., 2-14.
Single element detectors1-6.A.
Slide way assemblies1-2.B.
Small arms2-1.
Smart cards1-5.A.2.
Smoke canisters2-4.
Smoke grenades2-4.
Smoke projectors2-2.
Smooth bore weapons2-1.
Software (see corresponding equipment)
Software for weapon systems2-21.
Software, aero engines1-9.D., 6-3.D.
Software, communication surveillance1-5.D.
Software, computational lithography

1-3.D.

Software, densification6-6.D.
Software, design integration6-16.D.
Software, decrypt Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) ranging Code1-7.D.5., 2-21.
Software, direction finding6-9.D.
Software, EMP Restore1-3.D.
Software, environmental test facilities6-15.D.
Software, flight control6-12.D.
Software, flight instrument integration6-9.D.
Software, launch support6-12.D.
Software, marine1-8.D.
Software, military cyber operation2-21
Software, missiles, rockets and UAVs1-9.D., 6-1.D.,
6-19.D.,
6-20.D.
Software, modeling6-16.D.
Software, navigation and avionics1-7.D., 6-9.D.,
6-11.D.
Software, nuclear effects6-18.D.
Software, optical sensors1-6.D.
Software, propellant production6-4.D.
Software, propulsion1-9.D., 6-3.D.
Software, pyrolytic deposition6-6.D.
Software, radiation hardening6-18.D.
Software, simulation6-16.D.
Software, stealth6-17.D.
Software, structural composites6-6.D.
Softwood lumber5104., 5105.
Solar cells1-3.A.1.
Solid fuels2-8., 6-4.C.
Solvent extractors3-2.6.1.
Sonar equipment1-6.A.
Sounding rockets6-1.A., 6-19.A.
Source materials3-1.1.
Space launch vehicles1-9.A., 6-1.A.
Spacecraft bus1-9.A., 5504.
Spacecraft and related equipment1-9.A., 2-11.,
5504
Spacecraft simulator1-9.A., 5504.
Spectrometers3-2.5.5.,
3-2.5.7.,
4-3.B.6.
Spin-forming machines1-2.B., 4-1.B.,
6-3.B.
Spindle assemblies1-2.B., 4-1.B.
Spotting instruments2-5.
Spraying systems7-12.9.
Spray cooling 1-3.A.
Spray drying equipment7-12.6.
Spread spectrum radio equipment1-5.A.1.,
1-5.A.2.,
2-11.
Sputter deposition production equipment1-2.B.
SQUID, Magnetometer1-6.A.
SRAMs1-3.A.
Stabilisers6-4.C.
Stabilisers, explosives2-8.
Staging mechanisms6-3.A.
Star tracker1-7.A., 6-9.A.
Stealth devices and materials1-1.C., 2-17.,
6-17.
Stealth technology1-1.E., 2-22.,
6-17.E.
Steel4-2.C., 4-3.B.,
4-4., 6-6.C.
Storage tanks7-2.1.
Striplines4-6.A.6.
Structural material6-6.C.
Submarine nets2-9.
Submarines1-8.A., 2-9., 9-6.
Submersibles & systems1-8.A.
Submunitions2-3.
Sub-orbital craft

1-9.A.

Substrates1-3.C., 1-6.C.
Sugar5203.,5204., 5205., 5206.
Sugar confectionary and chocolate preparations5206.
Sugar-containing products5203., 5205., 5206.
Superalloys1-9.B.
Superconducting solenoid magnets4-3.A.
Superconductive composite1-1.C.
Superconductive electromagnetic sensors1-6.A.
Superconductive electromagnets1-3.A., 4-3.A.
Superconductive equipment2-20.
Surface acoustic wave devices1-3.A.
Surface vessels2-9.
Surveillance equipment, target2-5.
Surveillance systems, electronic2-11.
Survey systems, bathymetric1-6.A.
Switching equipment, digital1-5.B., 1-5.D.,
1-5.E.
Switching devices, electronic4-6.A.
Symmetric algorithms for cryptography1-5.A.2.
Syntactic foam1-8.C.
Synthesis reactors4-4.A.
Syrup5204
Systolic array computers1-4.A.
Tank destroyers2-2.
Tanks2-6.
Tantalum7-2.1.
Tape laying machines1-1.B., 6-6.B.
Target acquisition2-5.
Target drones1-9.A., 6-1.A.,
6-19.A.
Target surveillance equipment2-5.
Target assemblies for the production of tritium4-2.A.
Tear gas2-7.
Technology (see corresponding equipment)
Technology, A to D converters1-3.E., 6-14.E.
Technology, advanced materials1-1.E.
Technology, aero engines1-9.E., 6-3.E.
Technology, analogue computers1-4.E., 6-13.E.
Technology, biological7-15.
Technology, ceramic powder1-1.E
Technology, chemical7-6.
Technology, densification6-7.E.
Technology, design integration6-16.E.
Technology, diesel engine  propulsion systems1-9.E.
Technology, diesel engines components1-9.E.
Technology, direction finding6-9.E.
Technology, ECM/EDM drilling1-2.E., 1-9.E.
Technology, environmental test facilities6-15.E.
Technology, flight control1-7.E., 6-10.E.
Technology, fuel injection system1-9.E.
Technology, gas turbine engines  & components1-9.E., 6-3.E.
Technology, information security1-5.E.2.
Technology, laser drilling1-9.E.
Technology, launch support6-12.E.
Technology, marine1-8.E.
Technology, military2-22.
Technology, missiles, rockets and UAVs1-9.E., 6-1.E.,
6-19.E.,
6-20.E.
Technology, modeling6-16.E.
Technology, navigation and avionics1-7.E., 6-9.E.,
6-11.E.
Technology, nuclear effects6-18.E.
Technology, power transfer systems1-9.E.
Technology, propellant production2-22., 6-4.E.
Technology, propellants2-22., 6-4.E.
Technology, propeller blades1-9.E.
Technology, propulsion1-9.E., 6-3.E.
Technology, pyrolytic deposition6-6.E.
Technology, simulation6-16.E.
Technology, stealth6-17.E.
Technology, structural composites1-1.E., 6-6.E.
Technology, structural material1-1.E., 6-17.E.
Technology, telecommunications1-5.E.
Technology, tempest1-5.E.
Technology, variable geometry airfoil1-7.E.
Technology, water jet drilling1-9.E.
Technology, wind tunnels1-9.E., 6-15.E.
Telecommunications equipment1-5.A.1.
Telecontrol equipment6-12.A.
Telemetry equipment6-12.A.
Telemetry, tracking and control1-9.A., 5504.
Tellurium1-6.C.
Tempest equipment1-5.A.3.
Terrestrial geophones1-6.A.
Test benches6-15.B.
Test equipment, electronics1-3.B.
Test equipment, telecommunications1-5.B.
Test equipment, tempest1-5.B.2.
Test facilities, military2-18.
Thallium arsenic selenide1-6.C.
Thermal batteries6-12.A.
Thermal imaging equipment1-6.A., 2-15.
Thermodynamic analysis6-16.D.
Thermoplastic liquid crystal1-1.C.
Thorium3-1.
Thrust chambers1-9.A.
Thrust vector control6-2.A.
Thyristor devices1-3.A.1.
Thyristor modules1-3.A.1.
Titanium and alloys1-1.C.,
3-2., 4-2.,
6-6.C.,
7-2.1., 2-8.
Titanium doped sapphire1-6.C.
Titanium-stabilised duplex stainless steel6-6.C.9.
Toroidal Field Coils5502
Torpedo nets2-9.
Torpedoes2-4.
Tow-placement1-1.B.
Toxic chemicals7-3.
Toxic gas monitors and monitoring systems7-2.4.
Toxicological agents2-7., 7-13.
Toxins2-7., 7-13.
Tracking systems6-12.A.
Tractors, military2-6.
Trailers, military2-6.
Trainers, military2-14.
Training equipment2-14.
Transducers1-6.A., 1-9.B.,
4-3.A.
Transistors1-3.A.
Transmission equipment1-5.A.1.
Travelling wave tubes1-3.A.
Tritium4-2.C.
Tritium production, separation and handling 4-2.B.
Tunable filters1-3.A.
Tungsten4-2.C., 6-6.C.
Tungsten alloys1-1.C., 4-2.C.,
6-6.C.
Tungsten and molybdenum alloys6-6.C.
Turbofan engines1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-3.A.
Turbojet engines1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-3.A.
Turning machines1-2.B., 4-1.B.
Underwater cameras1-6.A., 1-8.A.
Underwater communications1-5.A.1.
Underwater detection devices2-9.
Underwater electric field sensors1-6.A.6.
Underwater light systems1-8.A.
Underwater robots1-8.A.
Underwater sonar navigation systems1-7.A., 2-9.
Underwater survey equipment1-6.A.
Underwater swimming apparatus1-8.A., 2-17.
Underwater vessels1-8.A., 2-9.
Underwater vision systems1-8.A.
United States origin goods5400
Unmanned Vehicles Air(borne) (UAVs)1-9.A., 2-10.,
6-1.A., 6-19.A.
Unmanned Vehicles, Submersible1-8.A.
Uranium3-1.
Uranium conversion plants3-2.7.
Uranium, depleted3-1.
Uranium isotope separation equipment3-2.5., 4-3.
Uranium titanium alloys1-1.C.
Vacuum furnaces4-1.B.
Vacuum induction furnaces4-1.B.
Vacuum pumps3-2.5., 4-3.A.8.
Valves3-2., 4-3.A.,
6-3.A., 7-2.1.
Vapour deposition equipment1-3.B.
Vaporization systems3-2.5.7.
Vehicles2-6., 5210.
Vessels1-8.A., 2-9., 9-6.
Vibration test equipment1-9.B., 4-1.B.,
6-15.B.
Vibration test systems4-1.B., 6-15.B.
Viruses, human, animal, plant7-13.
Visual imaging equipment1-6.A.
Volume median diameter7-12.8.
Wafer handling systems1-3.B.
Wafers1-3.A.
Warhead mechanisms6-2.A.
Water tunnels1-8.B.
Water-H2S exchange columns4-4.B.
Water-hydrogen sulfide  exchange tray columns3-2.6.
Weapon sights2-1., 2-2.
Weaving machines1-1.B., 6-6.B.
Wet spinning equipment6-6.B.
Wind tunnels1-8.B., 1-9.B.,
Wood products5101., 5102.,
5103., 5104.
X-ray systems1-3.A., 4-5.B.
X-ray thermal protection6-18.A.
X-ray tomography1-1.B.
Zinc selenide (ZnSe)1-6.A., 1-6.C.
Zinc sulfide (ZnS)1-6.A., 1-6.C.
Zirconium metal and alloys1-1.C., 2-8.,
3-2.1, 4-2.C.,
6-4.C.
Zirconium powder2-8., 6-4.C.
Zirconium tubes3-2.1.
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