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Departmental Plan 2022–23

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Cette publication est aussi disponible en français sous le titre : Plan ministériel 2022-2023

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© Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minsters of Foreign Affairs, International Trade and International Development, 2022.

Cat. No.  FR2-24E (PDF)
ISBN 2371-7688 (PDF)

The Honourable Melanie Joly
Minister of Foreign Affairs

The Honourable Mary Ng
Minister of International Trade, Export Promotion, Small Business and Economic Development

The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan
Minister of International Development

From the Ministers

With our world facing increasingly complex, interrelated challenges, the time to act is now.

Canada must play a leadership role on the global stage in meeting these challenges.

As we do so, we must be guided by our values and institutions for protecting democracy, inclusivity, human rights, gender equality, peace and security, the rule of law, rules-based international trade, and strong and resilient supply chains.

The well-being of Canadians and the relationships we build around the world are closely tied to the strength and vitality of these priorities.

In the coming year, Global Affairs Canada will pursue a number of key priorities while fulfilling its core diplomatic, trade, development, security and consular responsibilities to support Canadians and international communities.

We will promote democracy and human rights while helping to shape and reinforce the rules-based international system, including through our leadership in the Ottawa Group and through our more than 14 free trade agreements.

We will expand opportunities for Canadian businesses to start up, scale up and succeed around the world, creating jobs and generating growth through international trade and export diversification. Canada is a leading global trade partner, and this work will only grow in the coming year.

We will deepen Canada’s global engagement through our existing bilateral and multilateral relationships and by engaging new and non-traditional partners and groups.

We will continue our efforts to eradicate poverty and achieve the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals while pursuing our feminist foreign policy agenda.

No country can afford to ignore the profound challenges posed to our lives and communities by climate change, and we will take concrete action on climate and the environment.

The pursuit of these broad, overarching priorities will complement our efforts to deliver on our mandate commitments to Canadians.

Those commitments include some immediate priorities: strengthening Canada’s diplomatic capacity and deepening our partnerships in new and specific regions, supporting developing countries with an equitable global pandemic response, strengthening and securing critical supply chains, and advancing Canada’s export diversification strategy.

In carrying out these and other plans, Global Affairs Canada will be guided by key policy frameworks and strategies. These include the feminist foreign policy, the Feminist International Assistance Policy, the Cultural Diplomacy Strategy and the Road Map for a Renewed United States-Canada Partnership. We will develop and launch a comprehensive Indo-Pacific strategy and will implement the Arctic and Northern Policy Framework. At home, we will strengthen our department by implementing the Anti-racism Strategy 2021 to 2026, as well as the Action Plan on Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples.

The experienced, dedicated and knowledgeable employees of Global Affairs Canada are ready to help us deliver on our vision thanks to the department’s extensive diplomatic, trade, security, development and consular services and networks. We will use the tools and expertise at our disposal to inform and shape our efforts and deliver concrete results for Canadians.

The challenges of our time are many, and Canada is ready to respond as a global leader. With a focus on the health, security, prosperity, and values of Canadians, we are committed to playing a constructive and creative role in building a better world in the year ahead.

Plans at a glance

More than ever, the health, security and prosperity of Canadians is directly impacted by what happens around the globe. Global Affairs Canada will intensify efforts to find solutions to shared challenges, continue the fight against COVID-19 through global efforts to support fair and equitable access to vaccines, respond to immediate needs and build back better with partners around the world, including through Canada’s commitment to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The department will actively support the Government of Canada’s goals to advance an inclusive Canadian prosperity and security, including by reinforcing international peace and security, democracy, human rights, gender equality, the rule of law and environmental protection.

Global Affairs Canada will increase engagement with key partners around the world and seek to strengthen Canada’s international influence. In particular, the department will work to shape the global system to protect Canada’s interests, including through the development of an Indo-Pacific strategy; advance dedicated action on climate change and the environment; take a leading role in fighting global poverty; protect the rules based international order; strengthen and secure critical supply chains; combat protectionism and advance Canada’s export diversification strategy.

Crosscutting all the department’s work is Canada’s feminist foreign policy, a feminist approach to international engagement that is being pursued across all sectors and processes, from trade to diplomacy, international assistance, peace and security and consular services. Global Affairs Canada will continue to develop and implement the feminist foreign policy to ensure that the comprehensive, crosscutting nature of the policy is a catalyst for sustained and systemic change and contributes to advancing human rights; gender equality; diversity, equity and inclusion; the rule of law; as well as helping to dismantle persistent discriminatory practices and structural barriers that result in inequality. The development of Canada’s third National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security presents a key opportunity to advance the feminist foreign policy and achieve systemic change.

At home, Global Affairs Canada will implement the Anti-Racism Strategy 2021-2026, to enable a more equitable, inclusive and representative department; and the Action Plan on Reconciliation with Indigenous Peoples 2021-2025, to guide the department’s efforts to advance the rights, perspectives and prosperity of Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world. Global Affairs Canada will also actively work to integrate a sustainable development lens across all business lines through its Departmental Sustainable Development Goals Strategy 2020 to 2023, including contributing to the Federal Implementation Plan and Canada’s 2030 Agenda National Strategy.

The department will serve Canadians, their communities and the public interest in an inclusive and transparent manner, including by providing appropriate consular services to Canadians around the world. The department will also coordinate closely with other federal departments and agencies, provinces, territories and Indigenous communities in Canada on the range of actions and priorities in this departmental plan, including to better align domestic and international strategies. Global Affairs Canada will continue to listen to and work with Canadians and with Canadian civil society, non-profit organizations, research centres and the private sector in the pursuit of Canada’s interests.

To support this work in 2022-23, the department will focus on four priorities.

1. Shaping the rules-based international system and promoting democracy and human rights

Fostering an effective and inclusive rules-based international system is in Canada’s interest and an overarching objective of Canadian foreign policy. To that end, the department will strengthen cooperation with Canada’s closest partners and engage with non-traditional partners to further develop and leverage rules-based multilateral institutions and mechanisms. This will advance Canadian priorities and address global challenges that require shared solutions, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change and cyber threats.

Canada will work to strengthen Canada’s engagement and presence with the United Nations in order to ensure a more effective, efficient, relevant and accountable UN that supports a rules-based international system to better address those who are seeking to undermine democracy, human rights and the rule of law. It will also sustain its substantive engagement with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), international financial institutions (IFIs), the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Organisation of La Francophonie, the Commonwealth, the Organization of American States (OAS), the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), as well as with regional multilateral organizations where Canada is not a member, such as the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the African Union.

The department will also strengthen Canada’s support for UN peace operations, conflict prevention and peacebuilding, including through further advancement of the UN’s women, peace and security agenda, and make positive contributions to international peace and security through Canadian commitments to NATO. Canada will expand its engagement with allies, partners and international organizations to promote peace and security, support international emergency response, address humanitarian crises and support countries at greater risk of natural disasters, including those due to the effects of climate change. Canada will work with like-minded partners to develop and expand collective responses to cyber threats, foreign interference in democratic processes and egregious violations of human rights, including through sanctions and other mechanisms. Through these and other efforts, Canada will work to protect and revitalize the rules-based international system so that it is better positioned to serve Canadians and evolves in accordance with Canadian priorities to advance democracy, human rights, gender equality and the rule of law. Global Affairs Canada will continue to advance Canada’s ongoing response to the tragic downing of flight PS752, including by leveraging international conventions and treaties to which Canada and Iran are both parties.

Canada will also make its commitment to democracy and human rights a core strategic priority. Global Affairs Canada will pursue an integrated approach to advancing democracy across its international assistance and foreign policy activities through diplomacy, programming and advocacy. This will include expanding fast and flexible support for fragile and emerging democracies, increasing Canada’s diplomatic presence in regions of strategic importance and working more closely with democratic partners to promote open, transparent and inclusive governance around the world. Global Affairs Canada will defend the right of freedom of expression, including by building on the work of the Media Freedom Coalition; supporting the work of feminists, LGBTQ2+ activists, disability activists and human rights defenders; protecting those facing persecution; condemning and working to eradicate the practice of arbitrary detention—including by expanding the broad coalition of states supporting Canada’s initiative and advancing an action plan; and promoting inclusion, gender equality and a strong civil society. Canada will establish a Canadian centre to expand the availability of Canadian expertise and assistance to those seeking to build peace, advance justice, promote human rights, inclusion and democracy, and deliver good governance.

2. Deepening Canada’s global engagement

The department is committed to strengthen Canada’s international influence, building on Canada’s robust and constructive engagement as a G7 and G20 nation, a top-10 provider of development assistance and donor to UN funds and programs, a significant member of NATO and an influential voice in shaping the global agenda. This will involve further strengthening key bilateral relationships, expanding cooperation with like-minded partners and Canadian, international and multilateral organizations, and engaging new partners to address emerging challenges. Global Affairs Canada will advance these relations based on core Canadian interests, including sovereignty, national security, sustainable and inclusive economic prosperity, and key values such as democracy and human rights. The department will work to enhance solidarity, coordination and alignment with Canada’s closest partners, while protecting Canada’s independent interests and positioning it to deter and respond to any threat to sovereignty, stability and security. The department will also launch a new, whole-of-government cultural diplomacy strategy, to leverage the work of Canadian artists and cultural industries to support Canada’s diplomatic goals.

Canada will further strengthen its partnership with its closest ally, the United States, enhancing cooperation on border management, trade, the pandemic, economic recovery, diversity and inclusion, and energy and climate change, and jointly address global issues, including security and defence. Canada will also further strengthen its engagement with Mexico on shared priorities such as promoting Canada’s feminist foreign policy, trade and other issues affecting the continent.

In Europe, the department will work closely with the European Union and its member states, the United Kingdom and other European partners to achieve common goals related to foreign affairs, international security, free and fair trade and sustainable development. Across Asia and the Pacific, Canada will strengthen key bilateral and regional partnerships to advance shared interests. Working across the department and the federal government, Global Affairs Canada will develop and launch a comprehensive Indo-Pacific strategy. Canada will also deepen its partnerships in the Arctic, defend Canada’s Arctic sovereignty and implement the Arctic and Northern Policy Framework to create a future where Canada’s Northern and Arctic residents, especially Indigenous peoples, are thriving, strong and safe.

In the Middle East and North Africa, Canada will continue to work with partners to set the conditions for sustainable peace, support inclusive governance efforts, grow bilateral trade and advance human rights and gender equality. Canada will continue to engage in Latin America and the Caribbean, working regionally and with individual countries toward achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and fostering economic prosperity, and across the region to address common challenges related to climate change, democracy and irregular migration. In sub-Saharan Africa, the department will continue to strengthen economic and people-to-people ties, including by developing a strategy for economic cooperation across Africa, providing support for the African Continental Free Trade Area and for Canadian businesses to reach the Africa market, advancing democracy and human rights, supporting poverty eradication and addressing climate and health crises.

3. Supporting rules-based trade and Canadian exporters

Global Affairs Canada will continue working to preserve and expand open, rules-based trade and support Canadian businesses looking to grow into global markets. The department will work to combat protectionism, unfair trade practices and economic coercion around the world and to strengthen and secure critical supply chains, including through the Roadmap for a Renewed U.S.-Canada Partnership and working with international partners and allies. The department will also do so by advancing Canada’s export diversification strategy, negotiating new free trade and investment promotion and protection agreements, leading continued implementation of concluded agreements to ensure they benefit Canadian consumers and businesses, and advancing foreign investment attraction measures. The Indo-Pacific will be a region of particular focus for Canada’s efforts in this regard. Canada will continue leading World Trade Organization (WTO) reform efforts and supporting the broader multilateral trading system, advancing Canada’s global leadership on critical minerals, and addressing barriers to international trade and protecting the market access interests of Canadian companies abroad. The department will also continue to support Canadian businesses through the Trade Commissioner Service (TCS), notably by helping them take advantage of free trade agreement opportunities, providing expanded and innovative support options through the Canadian Technology Accelerators and the new Global Mentor Program, and helping foster an easily navigable ecosystem of federal services that includes establishing a new federal hub to help Canadians businesses and entrepreneurs take full advantage of the opportunities created by trade agreements. The TCS will also continue to support the attraction of foreign investment that supports growth and well-paying jobs in Canada.

Global Affairs Canada remains committed to advance Canada’s inclusive free trade agenda, which supports all segments of society in taking advantage of the economic opportunities flowing from international trade and investment. The department will promote exporter diversity and help Canadian businesses from traditionally underrepresented groups grow through international trade. This will include a focus on supporting the success of Indigenous businesses and entrepreneurs. Global Affairs Canada will release an enhanced and expanded Responsible Business Conduct Strategy and provide continued support to the Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise, contributing both to upholding the highest environmental and societal standards of corporate governance and to Canada’s competitiveness. The department will support and advance the international science, technology and innovation partnerships that help Canadian innovators thrive. Global Affairs Canada will continue to play a key role in attracting students from diverse countries to study at institutions across Canada.

4. Eradicating poverty

Global Affairs Canada will continue to implement the Feminist International Assistance Policy, which provides a strategic framework for Canada’s global response to complex challenges, such as COVID-19, and maintain an ongoing focus on gender equality, sustainable and inclusive development and human rights. Canada will invest in health, education, food systems and climate action; advance gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, including by doubling funding to women’s rights organizations and supporting LGBTQ2+ rights abroad; advocate for people with disabilities through programs and partnerships; and focus humanitarian, development and peace and security efforts on the poorest and those in the most vulnerable situations. In this context, Global Affairs Canada will deliver Canada’s international assistance in ways that support innovation and improve coherence, effectiveness, transparency and accountability, and that reinforce Canada’s commitment to realizing the UN’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The department is committed to leverage new and innovative financing approaches and to work with various partners to meet the needs of low- and middle-income country partners. This includes funding to support developing countries’ adaptation, mitigation and resilience efforts.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to advocate for inclusive, equitable and quality education for the most marginalized children, including refugee and displaced children and youth. It will also continue to support the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and girls, including the prevention of sexual and gender-based violence, and reduce and address inequalities generated by the unequal distribution of paid and unpaid care work. In the context of more complex and protracted crises, the department will further efforts to increase coherence between development, humanitarian and peace and security initiatives.

For more information on Global Affairs Canada’s plans, see the “Core responsibilities: planned results and resources” section of this plan.

Core responsibilities: planned results and resources

This section contains information on the department’s planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities.

International Advocacy and Diplomacy

Description

Global Affairs Canada promotes Canada’s interests and values through policy development, diplomacy, advocacy and effective engagement.

Planning highlights

Global Affairs Canada will continue its strong leadership in support of Canada’s feminist foreign policy through focused advocacy and diplomacy programs that seek to uphold and advance human rights, gender equality and democratic values; promote biodiversity and climate change action; support sustainable and inclusive economic growth; and build lasting peace and security. Canada’s efforts to preserve and expand open, rules-based trade will continue to be front and center, helping to advance broader international efforts to address the lasting impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, and foster strong and resilient supply chains. Canada will also work with its international partners to advance action on common global goals, including the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests

Through existing and evolving advocacy and diplomacy mechanisms, including through a new cultural diplomacy strategy, Global Affairs Canada will continue to develop diverse and productive international partnerships and strengthen long-standing relationships to advance Canada’s interests and objectives, both bilaterally and multilaterally. Canada’s foreign policy commitments will focus on climate change, democratic values and countering trade protectionism. Canada will prioritize the promotion of democracy, human rights, gender equality and the rule of law and will continue to be a global leader in championing the rights of women and girls in all their diversity, LGBTQ2+ people and other marginalized communities. Canada will continue to take real climate action, including through enhancing strategic policy leadership on climate change, biodiversity, land degradation and agri-food systems; fostering engagement with other government departments and international and domestic partners; and contributing to global efforts to build a resilient, net-zero and nature-positive world.

Feminist foreign policy

Canada’s feminist foreign policy is an ambitious and concrete commitment to build a more inclusive and sustainable world through the department’s diplomatic, trade and development actions. It seeks to reinforce the overarching objectives of strengthening a rules-based international system, supporting lasting peace, security and shared prosperity. Canada’s feminist approach is grounded in advancing human rights, dismantling persistent inequalities and addressing fundamental structural barriers that prevent gender equality, accounting for the needs of those most affected by multiple forms of discrimination.

With the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to pose a global challenge, Canada will remain focused on contributing to the global response to finish the fight and build back better with its partners around the world. This will require action on two fronts: addressing immediate needs and helping to establish the foundation for a resilient and sustainable pandemic recovery. Canada will fight the pandemic to save lives, including by strengthening health systems and key institutions; to manage financial stresses and stabilize economies, including through strengthening Canada’s trade partnerships and reinforcing global supply chains; and to support the most vulnerable to reduce poverty and growing gender inequality, including by working with partners to ensure fair and equitable access to vaccines and other resources. By deepening partnerships through the COVID-19 Access to Tools Accelerator (ACT-A) and exercising leadership within its vaccine pillar, COVAX, Canadian engagement will help end the acute phase of the pandemic for everyone, everywhere.

Recognizing that global challenges require global solutions, Canada will continue to contribute its expertise and leverage its influence in key multilateral forums, including the UN, the G7, the G20, the Commonwealth, La Francophonie, the OECD, the European Union, the African Union, ASEAN, the Pacific Alliance, APEC, the OAS, NATO, the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), the OSCE and a wide range of bodies and entities created under international treaties to which Canada is a party.

In the face of the lingering impacts of the pandemic, Canada’s close ties with its continental partners, the United States and Mexico, have proven essential to keeping citizens healthy and safe while ensuring that goods and services continue to flow between the countries. Given the growing strain on global economies, meeting each country’s individual needs while strengthening regional cooperation will be essential to building back a better post-pandemic North America. This includes working to support the effective implementation and enforcement of the Canada–United States–Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) and its environmental cooperation agreement; pursuing inclusive and progressive trade and investment policies; reinforcing Canadian defence and security, including by investing in continental defence and working with the United States to modernize NORAD; addressing the root causes of irregular migration in Central America; and promoting clean energy, environmental protection and resource security. This also includes working together on public health, reliable transportation networks, secure and resilient supply chains and economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. Global Affairs Canada will engage at all levels with decision makers and opinion shapers in North America, including at the state and local levels, to advance Canada’s interests and foster strong partnerships. With respect to the United States, Canada will continue its close cooperation on operations around the world, including in Europe through NATO and to build the capacity of the Ukrainian security forces and deter Russian aggression; across the Middle East through the United States-led Global Coalition to defeat Daesh; maintaining a maritime presence and upholding sanctions in the Asia-Pacific region; and, illicit trafficking operations in the Caribbean Sea and eastern Pacific Ocean.

Canada will work in partnership with European countries to uphold shared values and interests. As Canada pursues a sustainable, broad-based economic recovery from the pandemic, Global Affairs Canada will seek out markets, investments and innovation partnerships in Europe that benefit workers and businesses alike. The Canada-EU Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is an especially crucial tool; the department will work to promote its full use in the interests of both parties. The department will work beyond CETA to grow Canada’s commercial relationships with important markets in the United Kingdom and the European Free Trade Association countries. Canada has a long-standing interest in Europe’s stability, security and prosperity, and will cooperate with the European Union and its member states, as well as the full range of other partners in Europe, including Ukraine, on international peace and security; gender equality; democracy; human rights; diversity, equity and inclusion; climate change; and the rules-based international system.

Global Affairs Canada will also build on Government of Canada efforts to strengthen Canadian leadership in the Arctic and support a rules-based international system that focuses on Earth observation, environmental protection, combatting climate change and sustainable socio-economic cultural development. The department will work to implement Canada’s international Arctic policy, as reflected in the Arctic and Northern Policy Framework, in close cooperation with domestic and international partners, including territorial and provincial governments and Indigenous peoples. To enable progress in these and other areas, the department will ensure substantive support for Canada’s engagement on the Arctic Council and work in partnership with Indigenous peoples to advance their rights, to clearly define Canada’s Arctic boundaries and to conduct targeted advocacy to broaden international engagement on Canada’s Arctic and Northern priorities.

Global Affairs Canada will coordinate the development and launch of an integrated, whole-of-government Indo-Pacific Strategy that will deepen Canada’s diplomatic, economic and defence partnerships and international assistance in the region. This includes deepening cooperation between Canada and Japan to advance our shared vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific.

Canada’s evolving China Policy Framework will be integrated within the Indo-Pacific Strategy. Under this framework, Canada will continue to advance its interests through judicious and principled engagement with China and by providing services that support Canadian stakeholders in the world’s second-largest market. Canada will challenge the government of China when values and interests diverge and cooperate where interests align. Advocacy and diplomacy efforts, including through the G7, Five Eyes (intelligence alliance with Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States) and the multilateral system, will remain focused on the respect for and protection and promotion of human rights and fundamental freedoms and championing the rules-based international system. Canada will continue to speak out against the China’s repression of the Uyghur and Tibetan peoples, and of all religious minorities in China. With respect to Hong Kong, Canada will continue to adjust approaches in the context of the rapid deterioration of personal rights and freedoms of Hong Kong citizens following the implementation of the National Security Law in 2020. Canada will continue to support Taiwan’s meaningful participation in international organizations, where appropriate, and strengthen their economic partnership while also urging restraint across the Taiwan Strait in the interest of peace and stability. Global Affairs Canada will work alone and with like-minded partners to combat economic coercion, which poses a considerable threat to the rules-based international system and harms Canadian economic interests.

Bilaterally and multilaterally, Canada will continue its strong advocacy and action for a sustainable solution to the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar and Bangladesh.

Sustainable development, peace and cooperative bilateral relationships in the Middle East and North Africa will be fostered through a wide range of foreign policy tools. Canada will work with the United Nations and others to support peacebuilding in the Middle East, including through diplomatic and multilateral engagement. Canada will also work closely with its partners to counter the threat posed by Iran and Iran-backed groups in the Middle East and will support international diplomatic efforts to monitor and curtail the Iranian nuclear program. In the same vein, Canada will look for opportunities to build on and support implementation of the Abraham Accords, with a view to support intra-state dialogue and cooperation throughout the region, including through triangulation of trade and investment with partners in the region. Also in trade and economic development, Canada will build on its participation in Expo Dubai 2020 by identifying and supporting opportunities for Canadian businesses in the region, as well as promoting Canada as an investment destination by regional investment firms. As Egypt prepares to host the next United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties (COP) event in 2022, Canada will work with Middle Eastern and North African countries to address climate change and biodiversity loss and advance environmental protections while ensuring sustainable, resilient, nature-positive and inclusive global economic development.

Canada will also continue to engage in Latin America and the Caribbean to build shared prosperity and security, including by addressing needs generated or exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. We will consolidate gains from bilateral and multilateral engagements, notably through constructive participation in the Organization of American States and 2022 Summit of the Americas, and through sustained engagement with the Caribbean Community (CARICOM). Important objectives of cooperation will be to pursue a feminist foreign policy that promotes effective multilateral action and inclusive economic growth, which includes mobilizing additional private investment, particularly for women and Indigenous and marginalized peoples’ economic empowerment, advancing democratic principles, defending human rights, addressing the root causes of irregular migration, acting on climate change, especially in the Caribbean and with Small Island Developing States, and supporting pandemic recovery, including improving equitable, affordable and timely access to vaccines. Global Affairs Canada will continue close cooperation with international and local partners in pressing for peaceful democratic resolutions in Venezuela and Nicaragua. Canada will promote a multi-donor strategic approach in Haiti to fight insecurity, support local populations affected by the earthquake and COVID-19, and promote food security and economic renewal, while using its leadership to support reconstruction and sustainable development.

In sub-Saharan Africa, Canada will continue to foster productive relationships, including with African governments, the African Union, the African Development Bank, regional economic communities, La Francophonie and the Commonwealth. Through strong partnerships and in alignment with the Feminist International Assistance Policy, Canada will seek to advance human rights, sustainable development, governance, peace and security, and inclusive economic growth, while enhancing Canadian trade and investment ties across the continent. Global Affairs Canada’s strategic advocacy efforts will continue to promote gender equality, including through the advancement of the health and rights of women, girls and LGBTQ2+ communities in the region. Special effort will be made to work in solidarity with African and multilateral partners to play a meaningful role in supporting recovery and mitigating the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change and biodiversity loss on the most marginalized and vulnerable communities. Canada will also continue to support the G7 Signature Initiative to Mitigate Biological Threats in Africa, in partnership with the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention and African countries. Sub-Saharan Africa remains a source of important economic, security and political partnerships for Canada, relationships that will be further deepened in the year ahead.

Canada’s leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world

In the face of rising authoritarianism, foreign interference and great power competition, Canada will continue to champion international peace and security, democracy, gender equality, respect for human rights, and the rule of law. Canada’s political, economic and security values and interests will be advanced with a feminist approach, integrating coherent foreign affairs, trade and international assistance objectives. This includes undertaking targeted diplomacy and advocacy initiatives that promote gender equality, diversity and inclusion, democracy and human rights, peace and security, and poverty reduction, and address diverse challenges and the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Efforts to combat antisemitism

Global Affairs Canada will strengthen its efforts to combat antisemitism and hatred abroad, including through providing ongoing support to Canada’s Special Envoy on Preserving Holocaust Remembrance and Combating Antisemitism.

The promotion and protection of human rights remains an integral part of Canadian efforts abroad. Canada will implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and work in partnership with Indigenous peoples to advance their rights, internationally and domestically. Canada will also continue its strong advocacy efforts to help improve sexual and reproductive health and rights, address sexual and gender-based violence, increase women’s participation in peace and security efforts and decision-making processes, and advance the human rights of LGBTQ2+ persons and women and girls in all their diversity. Canada’s approach in these areas will be informed by regular and meaningful engagement with diaspora and faith and belief communities, civil society actors, academics, the private sector and the broader international community. In close collaboration with government and non-government partners, Canada’s engagement in multilateral forums, including the UN Human Rights Council, the UN General Assembly, the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance and regional organizations, will encourage respect for human rights online and offline, support human rights defenders and ensure accountability for human rights abuses and violations.

Canada will also continue to coordinate the G7 Rapid Response Mechanism as a platform to discuss national approaches and share real-time information on foreign threats to democracy, including those targeting democratic institutions and processes, media and the information environment, and fundamental freedoms and human rights, and offer opportunities for coordinated responses. The department will also actively contribute to whole-of-government efforts to address foreign interference in Canada, including through enhanced engagement with Canadian universities and research bodies, provincial/territorial/municipal actors and civil society.

In 2022-23, Canadian leadership will be visible in democratic and human rights forums. For example, Canada will chair the Freedom Online Coalition and focus on digital inclusion and shaping the global governance of digital technology to ensure the digital future is underpinned by respect for human rights and democratic principles. Canada will continue as co-chair of the Media Freedom Coalition, and engage with and support the Equal Rights Coalition and its global LGBT conference to be hosted by the United Kingdom in June 2022. Canada will chair the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in 2022 and by doing so, will support the organization’s work on the advancement of democracy worldwide. As well, Global Affairs Canada will continue to work toward establishing a new Canadian centre for global democracy, as announced by the Prime Minister at the U.S.-hosted Summit for Democracy in December 2021.

Preventing and fighting corruption remains a critical component of democratic renewal. To address and fight corruption globally, Canada will convene a high-level round table in 2022 to examine effective ways to strengthen international legal frameworks to combat corruption globally. Canada will also continue to support capacity-building initiatives to enhance the ability of foreign states to combat corruption, such as organized crime and money laundering, and ensure the transparent governance of natural resources in developing countries. Canada will exercise leadership to promote the rule of law at the United Nations and within other international organizations and continue to reinforce NATO’s role as a key pillar of the current rules-based international system and as the cornerstone of transatlantic security. Canada will work with its like-minded partners, including the G7 and NATO, to develop and expand collective responses to international security issues, focusing on coordinating responses to foreign interference and hostile activities by state actors, arbitrary detention, cyber threats, international crime and terrorism, weapons proliferation, and global health security. Building on years of advocacy and action, Canada will remain a global leader in promoting opportunities to advance the women, peace and security agenda.

Alongside members of the Global Coalition to Defeat Daesh, Canada will work to ensure the downfall of Daesh in Iraq and Syria, as well as its affiliates and branches worldwide. Canada will continue to sustain diplomatic efforts to address and respond to ongoing crises, such as in Afghanistan, the Tigray region of Ethiopia, Sudan, Mali and the Sahel region. This will be done, in part, through continued engagement with like-minded partners to promote peace and stabilization in the region, such as the Coalition for the Sahel and enhanced relations with the African Union.

Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law

Canada’s contribution to the revitalization of an effective, rules-based international system that promotes and protects the interests and prosperity of all Canadians is of increasing importance. To that end, Global Affairs Canada will strengthen cooperation with Canada’s closest partners, while engaging with non-traditional partners, to further develop and leverage rules-based multilateral institutions and mechanisms to advance Canadian priorities and address global challenges. Importantly, Canada will strengthen its engagement and presence in the UN system to ensure a more effective, efficient, relevant and accountable United Nations, one that supports a rules-based international system and is better able to address those who are seeking to undermine democracy, human rights and the rule of law. Canada will also continue its active support for and engagement with other international institutions of which it is a member, including the International Criminal Court, WTO, Arctic Council and International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes.

Recognizing that the Commonwealth and La Francophonie are key international partners in promoting Canada’s foreign policy and international assistance objectives, with a significant strategic reach in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean, Canada will continue working with these institutions in areas of gender equality, human rights and democracy, and climate change, as well as supporting their organizational improvements to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, relevance and accountability.

Global Affairs Canada’s leadership role in advancing the development, promotion and application of international law is a key element in efforts to strengthen the rules-based international system across a variety of bilateral, regional and multilateral initiatives and actions. Global Affairs Canada will continue to support the Government of Canada through the provision of legal advice and legal policy guidance on international legal issues, which helps ensure that Canadian policies, priorities and programs are informed by international legal considerations and that the outcomes of international discussions and negotiations are consistent with Canada’s international legal obligations. The department will increase its attention on international law issues arising from cyber, digital and Internet developments, including on cyber security and cybercrime and Internet jurisdiction matters. As well, Global Affairs Canada will maintain its active engagement in and support for key international legal forums, such as the UN General Assembly’s Sixth Committee, the International Criminal Court and conferences of the parties to multilateral environmental agreements, such as the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Paris Agreement. Global Affairs Canada will also continue to oversee the application of Canada’s treaty adoption process, as outlined in the current Policy on Tabling of Treaties in Parliament, and provide services relating to international law and legal cooperation, such as authentication of documents, mutual legal assistance and treaty registration and preservation.

Canada will maintain its active engagement on non-proliferation, arms control and disarmament. It will also continue to play its leadership role in mitigating chemical weapons threats and restoring respect for the global norm against chemical weapons, in fulfilment of Canada’s commitment as Champion for item nine of the UN Secretary General’s Agenda for Disarmament, and remain steadfast in calling for accountability for the perpetrators of chemical weapons use in Syria. Canada will reinforce the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons as a keystone of the international disarmament architecture and support the disarmament efforts associated with the peaceful use of outer space through our continued participation and support of the UN Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Space and the Conference on Disarmament. As well, the Weapons Threat Reduction Program will continue its work related to chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear security, and support for the universalization and national implementation of conventional arms control regimes such as the Arms Trade Treaty and the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention. To prevent, detect and respond to infectious disease threats, whether natural, accidental or deliberate in origin, Canada will continue to demonstrate leadership and innovation in delivering programming to strengthen global health security (including in sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia). Additionally, support to reduce the nuclear threat posed by Iran and North Korea will continue via tangible support for key multilateral institutions, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Canada will work with partners to reinforce the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, in order to advance global disarmament and non-proliferation efforts, and facilitate international cooperation on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

Canada will continue to enhance the effectiveness and inclusivity of UN peace operations, including through support for the UN’s peacekeeping reform agenda and through the UN General Assembly Fifth Committee and Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations.

As chair of the International Coordination and Response Group for victims of Flight PS752, alongside state members Afghanistan, Sweden, Ukraine and the United Kingdom, Canada will stay focused on supporting families and loved ones and holding Iran accountable for its violations of international law. Canada will continue to seek accountability, transparency and justice for the victims of this tragedy and their families.

Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened

As the world continues to grapple with the impacts of the pandemic, ensuring that Canada has a strong voice to help shape pandemic recovery remains a top priority for the department. Canada will deepen its engagement across the UN system, including through the World Health Organization, as well as through the G7, the G20, APEC, the OAS, the OECD, IFIs, La Francophonie and the Commonwealth. As part of ongoing efforts to sustain and expand on Canada’s leadership in championing the SDGs, the department will continue its leadership role as co-chair of the Group of Friends of SDG Financing at the United Nations and will continue to support and promote the Financing for Development in the Era of COVID-19 and Beyond initiative, which Canada, Jamaica and the United Nations launched in spring 2020.

The emergence and lasting impact of COVID-19 has exacerbated the challenges faced by people affected by humanitarian crises, whether related to natural disasters, climate change or protracted armed conflicts. Canada’s continued commitment to providing timely, needs-based and gender-responsive humanitarian assistance is a tangible expression of Canadian dedication to alleviating the suffering of persons living through emergencies and crises. Canada will work within the global system and continue to support key humanitarian actors to address the needs of refugees and displaced persons in country and regional contexts, such as those being experienced in Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Myanmar, Ethiopia, Haiti, South Sudan, Syria and Venezuela and neighbouring countries.

The department will build on Canada’s strong reputation in certain regions, such as in Latin America and the Caribbean, to increase and advance alliances in support of Canada’s rules-based and inclusive trade objectives. The department will also work in trade-development nexus areas to create a competitive business environment through strengthening institutions, good governance, tackling corruption and inclusive growth. Furthermore, the lead-up to the 2022 Summit of the Americas will offer a series of engagements for Canada to continue to advance and assert its priorities. Canada is a partner of choice for the summit’s host country, the United States, and is engaged with other partners in the region in support of an agenda that serves to unify participants.

Canada will also increase efforts to assert the place of the French language in international organizations and promote its two official languages in its foreign relations. Canada’s official languages enrich Canadian diplomacy, and the French language is an asset in all diplomatic and advocacy initiatives, foreign relations and representation on governance bodies of international institutions.

Planned results for International Advocacy and Diplomacy

The following table shows, for International Advocacy and Diplomacy, the planned results, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022–23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Departmental resultDepartmental result indicatorTargetDate to achieve target2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
2020–21
actual result
Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.Percentage of advocacy campaigns which met their stated objectives.75%March 31, 2023100%80%75%
Percentage of diplomatic activities which met their stated objectives.72%March 31, 202387%70%73%
Number of international commitments through which Canada works with partners to address strategic peace and security challenges.Not applicableFootnote 1171413
Canada’s leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.Number of influencers and decision-makers reached through Canadian-hosted events, including events on women’s empowerment and rights and gender equality.3,000March 31, 2023Not applicable New indicator
Percentage of Canadian-led decisions introduced through international and regional organizations that are accepted.80%March 31, 2023100%100%100%
Number of Canadians in leadership positions in international institutions.18March 31, 202391817
Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.Percentage of organizations of which Canada is a member, which receive a positive performance rating on any independent evaluation.75%March 31, 2023100%100%100%
Degree to which Canadian positions on international legal issues are reflected in the outcome of discussions and negotiations, such as agreements, arrangements and resolutions.85%March 31, 202382%84%85%
Number of actions that are led or supported by Canada which support strengthened adherence to international law.20,935March 31, 2023Not applicable New indicator
Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.Ranking of Canada’s global presence as reflected by our participation in the global economy, our military presence and our people-to-people tiesBetween 5 and 8March 31, 2023888
Ranking of Canada’s reputation abroad as reported in global opinion pollsBetween 1 and 5March 31, 2023763
Percentage of Canadians who are satisfied with Canada’s international engagementAt least 46%March 31, 202346%Not applicableFootnote 2

The financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary spending for International Advocacy and Diplomacy

The following table shows, for International Advocacy and Diplomacy, budgetary spending for 2022-23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)2022–23 planned spending2023–24 planned spending2024–25 planned spending
904,561,152904,561,152897,217,339896,194,758

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for International Advocacy and Diplomacy

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022–23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 planned full-time equivalents2023–24 planned full-time equivalents2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
2,4902,4692,465

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Trade and Investment

Description

Global Affairs Canada supports increased and more diverse trade and investment to raise the standard of living for all Canadians and to enable Canadian businesses to grow internationally, and to create economic opportunities.

Planning highlights

Global Affairs Canada will continue to promote a more open and inclusive economic environment that responds to the challenges and opportunities posed by the evolving digital and green transitions and that supports a sustainable post-pandemic recovery. This will be achieved through deepening and diversifying Canada’s trade relationships, upholding and strengthening the rules-based international trade and investment system and building stronger and more resilient supply chains. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to demonstrate how interconnected the world is, as closed borders and limited flow of goods, capital and people continue to affect international trade and investment on a global scale. Global Affairs Canada will continue to focus on expanding ties with existing and emerging trading partners, resolving trade irritants, opening new markets for Canadian exports and new opportunities for attracting investment into Canada—all while supporting Canadians, including small businesses, women, Indigenous peoples, Black, racialized and LGBTQ2+ entrepreneurs, to better access and share in the benefits of international trade, investment and innovation. As part of a new Indo-Pacific strategy, Global Affairs Canada will negotiate new bilateral and regional trade agreements, expand Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreements, and build stronger economic linkages with the region.

Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system

Canada remains committed to strengthen and uphold a rules-based, open global trading system, supported by well-coordinated policies and programs that will help Canadians achieve a sustainable and inclusive recovery from the pandemic. While increased economic growth has helped drive down rates of extreme poverty and contributed to creating a larger global middle class, the multilateral trading system is under threat, as evidenced by rising protectionism and protracted disagreements and challenges faced by the WTO.

Global Affairs Canada recognizes that the importance of anticipating and managing problems in this challenging global context is greater than ever. Canada’s commitments will be advanced via the global trading system through continued and intensified trade policy advocacy and negotiations, and with newly formed relationships in various key trade areas. The department will engage with international entities such as the G7, the G20, APEC, the OECD, the World Intellectual Property Organization, the World Economic Forum and the WTO.

Canada will continue its work to reform and strengthen global systems to foster global trade and prosperity for everyone, including through Canada’s ongoing leadership of and engagement in the Ottawa Group on WTO reform. Key areas of work will include expansion of the Global Trade and Gender Arrangement, climate change mitigation and adaptation initiatives, frameworks for the digital economy, and seeking to ensure that the benefits of trade are inclusive and distributed equitably. In addition, Global Affairs Canada will continue to exercise leadership in key international trade law reform processes at the UN Commission on International Trade Law and the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes with respect to the reform of investor-state dispute settlement.

Global Affairs Canada continues to pursue free trade opportunities and advance Canada’s export diversification strategy for the benefit of Canadian exporters and consumers. This includes through the negotiation and implementation of bilateral and regional free trade agreements, bilateral foreign investment promotion and protection agreements, and other trade policy tools, including trade controls and dispute settlement where appropriate. Priority will remain on ensuring the implementation of trade controls for new agreements, including CETA, the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) and CUSMA, managing the steel safeguard tariff rate quotas, and continuing to monitor both steel and aluminium imports. The department will also continue to ensure Canada’s close relationship with the United States is effectively managed and strengthened by responding effectively to any existing or new barrier or trade action, including access for softwood lumber, and supporting the successful implementation of CUSMA.

The department will move forward on the ratification of trade and investment agreements, whether multilateral, plurilateral, regional or bilateral; air transportation agreements; and foreign investment promotion and protection agreements. This includes continued negotiation of a new bilateral agreement with the United Kingdom, as well as pursuing the full implementation of CETA. The department will also continue to enhance trade engagements with the Pacific Alliance and Mercosur and pursue new possible trade agreements with ASEAN and Indonesia, allowing Canada to gain broader access to regional markets in the Indo-Pacific and opportunities in emerging economies. In Africa, the department will support the development of a strategy for economic cooperation across the region, including support for the African Continental Free Trade Area, facilitation of increased infrastructure investment and expansion of partnerships in research and innovation.

Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts

Global Affairs Canada’s Trade Commissioner Service continues to support Canadian exporters and innovators through its global network of more than 1400 trade professionals working in 161 cities around the world and across Canada, and through its suite of CanExport funding programs for small and medium-sized enterprises, innovators and associations.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to ensure that collaboration and advocacy with its global partners maximizes innovation, investment and market access opportunities for all Canadians. Through the Export Diversification Strategy, more opportunities are being created for Canadian exporters and innovators to compete and succeed in new global markets and sectors, including further diversification in the Indo-Pacific region. Additionally, the TCS will continue its use of virtual and digital tools to effectively serve and connect clients to international market opportunities, given the ongoing pandemic and broader digital transformation.

The department will continue to promote Canada as an innovative, responsible and competitive leader in the global marketplace. To meet Canada’s goal of increasing overseas exports by 50% by 2025, Global Affairs Canada will continue its support for Canadian exporters and innovators that are entering new markets and expanding in others. It will establish a free trade agreement promotion hub to help Canadian businesses take advantage of free trade agreements such as CETA, CUSMA and the CPTPP. In cooperation with public and private sector partners, it will encourage more Canadian businesses to access the benefits negotiated in these agreements. Global Affairs Canada is also committed to strengthen supply chains, while avoiding measures that may hinder trade, and ensure that the benefits of Canada’s trade promotion and diversification efforts are maximized for all Canadians.

The department will continue to implement an e-commerce strategy that includes support for digital industries and the protection of Canadian intellectual property. This will be facilitated in part by training the TCS network in Canada and abroad about trends and analysis related to Canadian capabilities and risks. In addition, further tools, training and guidelines will be provided to enable the TCS network to support R&D activities through CanExport Innovation and the Canadian International Innovation Program, and to strengthen the ability to deliver tailored and enhanced services to high-potential, high-growth clients through the Canadian Technology Accelerator and Global Mentorship programs. Global Affairs Canada will also continue to provide sectoral analysis and contribute to export market development for Canadian businesses, especially small and medium-sized enterprises, in both emerging and traditional sectors.

The TCS will continue to develop and advance more inclusive approaches to trade through proactive engagement and initiatives that help to increase the number of exporters from under-represented groups. Importantly, the department will seek to reduce barriers faced by small businesses, women entrepreneurs, Indigenous peoples, visible minorities, newcomers, youth and LGBTQ2+ persons, including through the Business Women in International Trade Program.

Global Affairs Canada will launch a new responsible business conduct strategy to underscore the importance of responsible business conduct as part of Canada’s competitive advantage and help companies to mitigate related risks, particularly as they diversify into new markets.

The International Education Strategy (IES) is a key pillar in Canada’s post-pandemic economic recovery strategy and in maintaining Canada’s long-term competitiveness. The TCS will continue to implement the IES and promote Canada as a top study and research destination through targeted digital marketing campaigns, scholarship programs and participation at key international education events. The department will also continue to support international student recruitment and promote exports of Canadian educational products and services. Working collaboratively with other federal government departments, the provinces and territories, education associations and multilateral organizations, the department will ensure its efforts effectively advance Canada’s interests in the international education sector.

Global Affairs Canada will support Canadian firms pursuing procurement opportunities and financing offered by IFIs to advance projects in priority markets, including through Offices of Liaison with International Financial Institutions.

With respect to climate change, domestic and international initiatives will be pursued to support Canada’s transition to a net-zero economy by lowering greenhouse gas emissions. Global Affairs Canada will continue to support clients with effective climate change solutions, including through the Government of Canada Clean Growth Hub, and to promote Canadian clean technology exporters to foreign buyers and international investors.

The department will seek to enhance its collaborative work with Export Development Canada, the Canadian Commercial Corporation, Invest in Canada, the Business Development Bank of Canada and other federal partners that share similar mandates to support Canadian businesses.

Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained

The TCS will continue activities that raise foreign investor knowledge, awareness and interest in investing in Canada. The department will seek to strengthen Canada’s economic resilience by targeting investment projects from foreign-based multinationals to fill gaps in existing supply chains in key priority sectors.

The department will conduct regular, coordinated and strategic engagement with relevant federal government departments, provinces and territories, municipalities, and the Invest in Canada agency to help increase foreign direct investment into Canada. Through the CanExport Community Investments program, the department will continue to assist Canadian communities, including Indigenous communities, to attract, retain and expand foreign direct investment.

The department will support economic and environmental protection by focusing on innovation and green jobs, thereby building a more resilient, sustainable and competitive economy.

Planned results for Trade and Investment

The following table shows, for Trade and Investment, the planned results, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022-23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Departmental resultDepartmental result indicatorTargetDate to achieve target2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
2020–21
actual result
Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.Degree to which Canada opens markets and advances trade policy innovations through negotiations, agreements and discussions.4 (on a scale of 1-5)March 31, 2023444
Degree to which Canada works to resolve or mitigate market access barriers, disputes or other strategic policy issues.4 (on a scale of 1-5)March 31, 2023444
Percentage of applications for permits and certificates related to trade controls processed in accordance with service standards.90%March 31, 202398%98%99%
Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.Percentage of clients indicating satisfaction with the quality of services delivered by the Trade Commissioner Service.90%March 31, 202392%91%92%
Number of active business clients of the Trade Commissioner Service.17,000March 31, 2023 15,96816,94216,882
Value of Canada’s goods and services exports (in dollars).30% increase from 2017 to $820 BDecember 31, 2025$713 B (in 2018)$737.5 B (in 2019)$638.4 B (in 2020)Footnote 3
Number of Canadian exporters.15% increase from 2017 to 100,000December 31, 202545,081 (in 2018)45,533 (in 2019)83,790 (in 2020)3
Value of exports to overseas markets.50% increase from 2017 to $292 BDecember 31, 2025$210 B (in 2018)$216 B (in 2019)$196.7 B (in 2020)3
Number of concluded commercial agreements facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.1,500March 31, 20231,1331,4111,340
Number of international research and innovation partnerships facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.170March 31, 2023152159148
Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.Number of new foreign investments and expansions of existing foreign investments in Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.150March 31, 2023159128121
Number of investor visits to Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.225March 31, 2023241235100

The financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary spending for Trade and Investment

The following table shows, for Trade and Investment, budgetary spending for 2022-23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)2022–23 planned spending2023–24 planned spending2024–25 planned spending
375,140,952375,140,952347,726,111346,757,125

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Trade and Investment

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022-23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 planned full-time equivalents2023–24 planned full-time equivalents2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
2,1102,0992,094

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Development, Peace and Security Programming

Description

Global Affairs Canada programming contributes to reducing poverty, increasing opportunity for people around the world, alleviating suffering in humanitarian crises and fostering peace and security, and in so doing, advances the Sustainable Development Goals.

Planning highlights

Canada is firmly committed to the advancement of gender equality, sustainable development and human rights through the implementation of its Feminist International Assistance Policy. The Policy is one of a suite of international strategies guided by Canada’s over-arching feminist foreign policy and guides Canada’s efforts to contribute to eradicating poverty, building a more peaceful, inclusive and prosperous world, and to achieving the SDGs. In line with the Policy, Global Affairs Canada will address the disproportionate impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on marginalized groups and people in vulnerable situations, support global access to resources such as vaccines, including through the COVID-19 Vaccine Global Access (COVAX), and work with multilateral and bilateral partners to help foster an inclusive, sustainable, and resilient recovery. Global Affairs Canada is focusing its efforts to respond to the pandemic on three pillars where it can make an immediate and direct impact: fighting the pandemic, managing financial stresses and stabilizing economies, and supporting the most vulnerable and addressing the pandemic’s long-term socio-economic impacts. Canada will prioritize the promotion of democracy, human rights, gender equality and the rule of law and will continue to be a global leader in championing the rights of women and girls in all their diversity, LGBTQ2+ people and other marginalized communities. In support of a new Indo-Pacific strategy, Global Affairs Canada will deepen international assistance in the region.

The department will continue to lead Canada’s response to international emergencies and global food crises with the provision of international humanitarian and development assistance through Canada’s intersectional human rights-based feminist approach. This approach provides a solid framework for Canada’s efforts to meet the challenges of COVID-19 and address the disproportionate impacts of the pandemic on women and girls, marginalized groups and people in vulnerable situations. Efforts will continue to improve complementarity in Canada’s humanitarian, development and peace and stabilization programming and to help developing countries address the urgent, twin crises of climate change and biodiversity loss.

Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global threat that does not recognize borders and will only be overcome through coordinated global action. Canada is committed to a robust international effort to stop COVID-19 and to address its devastating health, social, economic and security impacts on people around the world. Since February 2020, Canada has committed over $2.6 billion to the global pandemic response, which includes $1.3 billion for the ACT-Accelerator, over $740 million in humanitarian and development assistance, and adapted funding arrangements with organizations to address COVID-19 needs worth over $555 million. Implementing this funding and ensuring it goes where it is needed most will be a key priority in the years to come.

To address the pandemic’s devastating consequences, nations must work toward fair and equitable access to vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostics everywhere in the world. To assist in these efforts, and to continue to position Canada as one of the lead donors, Canada will work to increase access to vaccines through investments of up to $15 million to the COVAX Manufacturing Task Force partners, to support South Africa’s messenger RNA (mRNA) Technology Transfer Hub and through the donation of surplus vaccine doses. Canada will donate the equivalent of at least 200 million doses to the COVAX facility by the end of 2022. In addition, through the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, Canada will continue to support R&D of a diverse portfolio of vaccines based on a range of vaccine approaches.

Health and rights of women and girls

Canada has made a historic 10-year commitment to improve the health and rights of women and girls around the world. This will reach $1.4 billion annually, starting in 2023; $700 million of the annual investment will be dedicated to sexual and reproductive health and rights.

Throughout its programming, Canada will focus on reaching the poorest, most vulnerable and marginalized through an intersectional, human rights-based feminist approach to address economic, political and social inequalities. Canada will also support targeted programming that provides greater access for persons living with disabilities, advances the rights of Indigenous peoples and advances gender equality and LGBTQ2+ rights abroad.

Global Affairs Canada will contribute to advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights, nutrition, maternal, newborn and child health and the fight against communicable diseases in an effort to safeguard the global health and rights of women and girls. Canada’s sexual and reproductive health rights investments take a comprehensive approach, with a specific focus on the neglected areas of safe abortion and post-abortion care, comprehensive sexuality education, family planning, and advocacy for sexual and reproductive health rights, as well as on sexual and gender-based violence. Canadian organizations will play a critical role in building local capacity and in strengthening the “rights” aspect of sexual and reproductive health rights. Canada will provide significant support to global health platforms to ensure effective and coordinated support for developing countries, including via the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance; the Global Polio Eradication Initiative; and the Global Financing Facility. Roughly $100 million per year will be directed to nutrition programming.

The department will also work toward addressing barriers and ensuring improved access to quality, inclusive and equitable education and skills training for all children and youth, especially girls, children with disabilities and refugees and other forcibly displaced children and youth. In support of activities targeted directly at addressing social and institutional barriers to girls’ education and promoting gender equality and the empowerment of girls in partner countries, the department will be investing in the Global Partnership for Education. Canada will also work with other donors to support the development of the next Education Cannot Wait strategic plan and funding replenishment. Global Affairs Canada will also continue to lead Canada’s international development response to help address the crisis in education for refugees and forcibly displaced children and youth, including through the department’s global campaign, Together for Learning. This campaign is intended to increase mission advocacy and engagement on education for refugee and forcibly displaced children and youth in humanitarian hotspots. It also aims to bring the voice of forcibly displaced youth into the dialogue on education programming and policy.

Canada recognizes the interconnectivity between climate change and gender inequality. In the context of the new international climate finance program, Canada is taking a leadership role in promoting a feminist approach to climate action. Building on its previous climate finance commitment, Canada pledged at the 2021 G7 Leaders’ Summit to double its international climate financing to $5.3 billion over the next five years, which includes increased funds for adaptation and biodiversity. The Government of Canada is also increasing the proportion of grant funding from 30 percent to 40 percent of climate finance resources. Canada will continue to work with international partners to deliver four initiatives under the $100-million Marine Litter Mitigation Fund in support of the Ocean Plastics Charter.

Global Affairs Canada will increase efforts in 2022-23 to help developing countries achieve cleaner economic growth, transition to climate-smart agriculture and food systems, and build climate-resilient and nature-positive economies. Canada’s support to various multilateral funds will contribute to delivering high-impact results and global benefits in the protection of biodiversity, climate change adaptation and mitigation, land degradation, and the management of international waters, chemicals and waste. Building on the UNFCCC COP 26, Canada will focus its global efforts on transitioning toward sustainable climate pathways by 2030 and net-zero (carbon neutral) by 2050, aligning with the UNFCCC and promoting the effective implementation of the Paris Agreement. These efforts will include advancing toward a nature-positive future (that is, halting and reversing biodiversity loss) by 2030, aligning with the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, UN Convention to Combat Desertification, Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework and the G7 2030 Nature Compact.

Enhanced empowerment and rights of women and girls in countries where Canada engages

Canada will continue to promote gender equality and support enabling environments that allow women and girls in all their diversity to thrive, specifically in the poorest and most fragile contexts. Recognizing that gender equality is a pre-requisite to achieving sustainable development and peace, it will continue to advance the women, peace and security agenda and remain a strong voice on the international stage and work to further leverage its position in key international institutions and forums, such as the United Nations, the Commonwealth, La Francophonie, the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC), IFIs, the G20 and G7, including by advocating for the continuation of the G7 Gender Equality Advisory Council first launched by Canada in 2018. Global Affairs Canada priorities will also include implementing concrete commitments arising from the 2021 Generation Equality Forum.

The COVID-19 pandemic, climate change and fragile regional contexts have worsened already prevalent global challenges to gender equality, setting back progress by decades. More than ever, concerted efforts are required to preserve gains and further transformative change in advancing gender equality as an effective approach to international development, climate action and durable peace. A post-pandemic recovery that does not promote the equal participation of women in the economy will not be fully successful. Global Affairs Canada will enhance its contribution to achieving Canada’s global priorities related to gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls by developing and implementing crosscutting, gender-responsive, climate smart and COVID-responsive programming.

The gender inequalities surrounding unpaid and paid care work have been exacerbated and exposed with the COVID-19 pandemic, and Canada has solidified its position as a leading advocate on this issue worldwide. At the Generation Equality Forum, Canada announced that it would commit $100 million in new funding for stand-alone programming to address issues in unpaid and paid care work in low- and middle-income countries in which Canada provides international assistance. Through this commitment, Canada will help address root causes of global inequality; help increase women’s participation in economic growth, education and public life; and ensure care workers are represented, have their voices heard and their rights supported.

Global Affairs Canada will also continue to advance Canada’s position on sexual and gender-based violence, harmful practices and child protection at international and multilateral forums, and through global and multilateral partners. The department will build on Canada’s increased investments in sexual and gender-based violence to advance targets of the Generation Equality Forum’s Action Coalition on Gender-based Violence. Canada will seek to continue to achieve broad cross-regional support on the biennial UN General Assembly resolution on child, early and forced marriage, which Canada co-leads with Zambia.

An important way Canada is working to accelerate progress on gender equality and women’s rights is through supporting and strengthening women’s rights organizations and movements as drivers of change. Global Affairs Canada will continue to provide women’s rights organizations with direct funding and institutional support through the Women’s Voice and Leadership program. Reaching over 800 local women’s rights organizations in 30 developing countries and regions, this innovative program is actively learning from this vibrant community how best to support local women’s rights organizations’ dedication, resilience and core mandate: human rights and justice for women and girls in all their diversity. In addition, the Equality Fund, established with $300 million from Global Affairs Canada to mobilize additional resources from philanthropy and the investment sector to support women’s organizations, will continue to provide grants to women’s organizations and resources to women’s funds to strengthen the feminist funding ecosystem in developing countries. Canada will remain engaged as a co-leader of the Generation Equality Action Coalition on Feminist Movements and Leadership. As Canada announced in 2021 alongside the Equality Fund and the Ford Foundation, the department will work closely with partners to establish and launch the Global Alliance for Sustainable Feminist Movements, which through advocacy and mobilization, aims to ensure more and better financial and political support for women’s rights and feminist organizations and movements.

Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises

As the global development challenges related to gender equality, climate change, biodiversity loss, security and fragility, health and income inequality continue and are exacerbated as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Global Affairs Canada remains committed to ensuring that people living in the most precarious and vulnerable circumstances are not left behind. These issues will continue to exacerbate the challenge of forced displacement and humanitarian need in the coming years. Over the past decade, the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance has climbed from 69 million in 2011 to over 274 million in 2022. COVID-19 has compounded challenges and made the lives of these millions of vulnerable people even more difficult. This has only increased the strain on a global humanitarian system.

Support for low income countries

On October 30, 2021, at the G20 Leaders’ Summit, Canada announced that it will channel 20% of its newly allocated International Monetary Fund Special Drawing Rights to support low-income and other vulnerable countries. Of this, $982 million will be distributed to the Poverty Reduction and Growth Trust.

In 2022-23, Global Affairs Canada will work in collaboration with experienced humanitarian partners, including the United Nations, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and international and Canadian non-governmental organizations, to meet the needs of crisis-affected people around the globe. The department will also continue its efforts to enhance the humanitarian system to ensure timely, appropriate, gender-responsive and effective needs-based humanitarian assistance, in accordance with Canada’s Grand Bargain commitments.

As the pandemic continues, there has been a sharp increase in food insecurity around the world due to the disruption of food production, supply and distribution. Acute hunger and malnutrition increased in both scale and severity. In response, the Government of Canada remains committed to providing emergency humanitarian and development assistance to help avert famine in affected countries by addressing deteriorating food security and nutrition needs.

Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages

Violent conflict and insecurity have wide, deep and lasting effects, often with regional and global implications such as irregular migration and terrorism. Canada is committed to addressing the root causes of conflict through integrated approaches to conflict prevention, stabilization and peacebuilding that are inclusive, gender responsive and coherent across the humanitarian-development-peace nexus. Canada will deliver effective international assistance in fragile and conflict-affected settings by working closely with like-minded partners and through multilateral forums to identify opportunities to support conflict prevention, peacebuilding, and democratic resilience, aligned with Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy. Through the Peace and Stabilization Operations Program (PSOPs), the department will continue to promote peace and stability through the delivery of flexible, agile and catalytic programs and the deployment of police and civilian experts to fragile and conflict-affected states. In 2022-23, country-specific conflict prevention, stabilization and peacebuilding activities will be undertaken in countries such as Colombia, Haiti, Mali, Myanmar, Syria and Ukraine. In many cases, such as the evolving security situation in Ukraine, the department will work with partners to ensure strong collaboration and coordination via the humanitarian-development-peace nexus to support peace and stabilization, including through longer-term support.

National Action Plan of Women, Peace and Security

In 2022-23, Global Affairs Canada will develop Canada’s third National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, which will provide an opportunity to review current focus and strengthen the integration of the WPS agenda into the government’s peace and security efforts.

Women are critical to peace and security efforts around the world. Canada’s second National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security (2017-2022) aims to increase the meaningful participation of women (including women’s organizations and networks in conflict prevention, conflict resolution and post-conflict state-building) and to ensure all of Canada’s peace and security efforts are gender-responsive and advance gender equality. Canada’s ambassador for women, peace and security (WPS), Jacqueline O’Neill, was appointed in 2019 and will continue to be the cross-governmental champion for the effective implementation of Canada’s National Action Plan on WPS. In 2022-23, the department will develop Canada’s third National Action Plan, building on the current action plan’s successes, including the important progress and commitments made, including in support of women peacebuilders. Global Affairs Canada will also review the current focus and increase the level of thematic ambition for Canada’s implementation of the WPS agenda, including exploring and including under-represented issues such as decolonizing WPS, LGBTQ2+, anti-racism, disability, cyber security and climate security. It will continue to focus on international WPS efforts, while committing to a more ambitious domestic implementation of the WPS agenda through an inclusive whole-of-government approach.

The department will continue to strengthen peace operations through support for specialized training and capacity building to troop- and police-contributing countries. Global Affairs Canada will also support international implementation of the Vancouver Principles on Peacekeeping and the Prevention of the Recruitment and Use of Child Soldiers.

The Government of Canada renewed the Elsie Initiative for Women in Peace Operations beyond its initial pilot end date of March 2022. This will allow Canada and key stakeholders to build on the significant momentum generated to date to increase the meaningful participation of uniformed women in UN peace operations. The Elsie Initiative will continue and deepen its focus on evidence-based policy and practice, working closely with key partners at the United Nations, within troop- and police-contributing countries and with a dedicated contact group of champion member states, to cement systemic change.

In an effort to promote Canada’s interests and values on issues of international peace and security, Global Affairs Canada will provide support to partners to build local capacity in combatting terrorism and transnational crime. It will also support partners to improve the prevention, mitigation and response to proliferation threats, work to reduce access to weapons of mass destruction and their related materials by terrorists and states of proliferation concerns, and promote and protect democracy, its values and its institutions globally. To advance Canada’s commitment to combatting transnational criminal and terrorist networks, including security vulnerabilities arising from the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Anti-Crime and Counter-Terrorism capacity building programs will maximize opportunities to improve gender equality and women’s empowerment in its programming. Canada will work to strengthen resilience and support effective responses to international crime and terrorism, and by so doing, reduce the threat to Canada and to Canadian interests abroad.

Global Affairs Canada will engage and work with trusted and new partners in all regions and continue to implement targeted peace and security programming in the Middle East, East and West Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and South and Southeast Asia. In 2022-23, the Counter-Terrorism Capacity Building Program (CTCBP) and the Weapons Threat Reduction Program will continue to support Canada’s efforts in the Middle East with counterterrorism and non-proliferation programming in Iraq, Lebanon and Jordan. The CTCBP will explore ways of contributing to international efforts to respond to the situation in Afghanistan through counterterrorism capacity-building support to neighbouring and regional states. In Africa, CTCBP programming in the Sahel, Lake Chad Basin and Horn of Africa will explore options for new programming to respond to terrorist and violent extremist groups expanding throughout the continent. In South and Southeast Asia, the CTCBP will continue to support regional counterterrorism initiatives, including with ASEAN member states. 

The department will also strengthen efforts to monitor the movement of foreign terrorist fighters, support resilient communities and work with allies and like-minded partners across multilateral forums such as the G7 Roma-Lyon Group and the Global Counterterrorism Forum to promote unity of effort to disrupt and deter terrorist activities and networks wherever they may emerge. 

Through its long-standing partnerships with international organizations such as the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), INTERPOL and the OAS, the Anti-Crime Capacity Building Program (ACCBP) will continue to combat the smuggling of migrants and trafficking of people, drugs and weapons, and enhance cooperation in the global fight against cybercrime. For example, Canada will continue to support operations such as the UNODC-led project in Central America, Operation Guardian Angel. In 2021, that project resulted in the arrest of 30 individuals charged with acquiring and distributing child exploitation materials. While retaining its strong position in Latin America and the Caribbean, the ACCBP will continue to assess opportunities to expand programming in other regions, including South and Southeast Asia and West Africa, in response to new and emerging risks posed by transnational organized crime to Canada’s national security and foreign policy interests.

Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation and experimentation

Fostering strong, diverse and inclusive partnerships is essential to achieving common international objectives and maximizing the impact and results of Canada’s international assistance. In collaboration with committed and engaged partners, Canada will work toward tackling the barriers to achieving gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls, as well as others who face discrimination or marginalization, and advancing the Sustainable Development Goals. Global Affairs Canada will work toward “rebuilding better and greener” to address setbacks experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic by delivering Canada’s international assistance in ways that encourage innovation, including innovative financing approaches, as well as effectiveness, transparency and accountability. These efforts will be guided by the Whistler principles to accelerate innovation for development impact.

Canada will support local ownership and streamline delivery of international assistance in accordance with principles of aid effectiveness, including transparency, accountability and financial stewardship. Global Affairs Canada will work to diversify its partnerships and enhance the reach and impacts of its international assistance investments, integrate innovative approaches and support new or improved locally driven solutions to achieve better results. To do this, the department will leverage Canadian partner expertise and networks. For example, the department will support organizations and movements in developing countries striving to address the barriers to equality that limit the ability LGBTQ2+ people to enjoy their human rights. The department will also support the ongoing Small and Medium Organizations (SMOs) for Impact and Innovation initiative. Under the SMO initiative, the department will continue to fund the testing of innovative solutions through the Fund for Innovation and Transformation and build and increase the capacity of Canadian SMOs through the Spur Change program, which aims to support SMOs, educators and Canadian youth regarding inclusive, gender-responsive, sustainable and innovative programming. The department will also continue to engage in dialogue with Canadian partner organizations, the International Development Innovation Alliance and the OECD’s DAC to promote innovation in international assistance.

In 2022-23, Canada will increase its collaboration on innovative financing with multiple partners in civil society and the private sector, with an aim to enhance the impact of its international investments. This will include through the continued implementation of Canadian initiatives, such as the International Assistance Innovation Program, FinDev Canada and the Sovereign Loans Program. Canada will also continue to leverage its position in key international institutions such as the G7, G20, WTO, OECD’s DAC and UN to be a strong actor on economic growth issues and facilitate access to financial capital through its shareholdings in the World Bank Group and regional development banks.

Global Affairs Canada will strengthen strategic policy, science and innovation partnerships to advance a feminist food systems approach, promote climate-smart agricultural solutions and scale up food system finance. One of the priorities for 2022-23 includes exploring the use of financial incentives for fund managers in the agriculture and food systems sector, which would be based on impact metrics related to gender equality and development impact.

The department recognizes that experimentation, through testing the effectiveness of initiatives before they are scaled up, is a valuable tool in its efforts to further evidence-based decision making to deliver strong results for Canadians on its international agenda. To this end, Global Affairs Canada will continue to improve its capacity related to experimentation and provide the tools and processes to effectively manage risks. In addition, the department will continue to integrate innovation into departmental policies, programs and initiatives, promote evidence-based decision making, promote innovation and experimentation, and more rigorously collect, analyze and use data to support evidence-based decision making.

Planned results for Development, Peace and Security Programming

The following table shows, for Development, Peace and Security Programming, the planned results, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022-23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Departmental resultDepartmental result indicatorTargetDate to achieve target2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
2020–21
actual result
Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.Number of people trained in demand-driven technical and vocational education and training.30,000March 31, 2023Not applicable
New indicator
Number of people reached with nutrition-specific interventions.150 MMarch 31, 2023Not applicable
New indicator
Number of entrepreneurs, farmers and smallholders provided with financial and/or business development services through GAC-funded projects.1 MMarch 31, 20233.5 M5.2 M: 2 M women 3.1 M men (35,000 gender not indicated)6.9 M: 2.8 M women 4 M men (4,315 gender not indicated)
Number of individuals with an enhanced awareness, knowledge or skills to promote women’s participation and leadership in public life.100,000March 31, 2023Not applicable
New indicator
Number of beneficiaries (m/f) from climate adaptation projects supported by GAC.To be decidedFootnote 4March 31, 20234.6 M2.8 M: 1.3 M women 1.4 M men (7,600 gender not indicated)5.9 M
Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.Number of people reached by GAC-funded projects that help prevent, respond to and end sexual and gender-based violence, including child, early and forced marriage and/or female genital mutilation.40 MMarch 31, 2023Not applicable
New indicator
Number of women’s organizations and women’s networks advancing women's rights and gender equality that receive GAC support for programming and/or institutional strengthening.2,000March 31, 20234538681,914
Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.Number of beneficiaries that receive emergency food and nutrition assistance in relation to need and in consideration of international response.Not applicableFootnote 586.7 M (in 2018)97.1 M115.5 M
Number of refugees and internally displaced persons assisted and protected.Not applicable
5
12.5 M Refugees assisted 41.4 M  IDPs protected/ assisted (in 2018)12.2 M Refugees assisted 43.5 M IDPs protected/ assisted13.1 M Refugees assisted 48.6 M    IDPs protected/ assisted
Number of people who have received sexual and reproductive health services, including access to contraception, through a humanitarian response delivered by civil society organizations.Not applicableFootnote 6Not applicable
New indicator
Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.Percentage of international assistance that targets fragile and conflict-affected states.Not applicableFootnote 759%55%40%
Number of Canadian supported interventions taken by partners to prevent, detect and/or respond to crime, terrorism, and the proliferation of weapons, including weapons of mass destruction and related materials.170March 31, 2023222233202
The amount of international assistance funds ($) invested by Global Affairs Canada in international and national efforts to investigate and prosecute crimes committed in situations of violent conflict, including crimes involving sexual and gender-based violence.Not applicableFootnote 8Not applicable
New indicator
$222.05 M
Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.Number of new partners that receive GAC support for programming in the delivery of international assistance, disaggregated by type.52March 31, 2023Not applicable
New indicator
6146 new partners: 9 Civil society (Canadian) 27 Civil society (Foreign) 4 Multilateral (non-core) 1 Private sector (Canadian) 5 Private sector (Foreign)
Percentage of initiatives implementing innovative solutions in the delivery of international assistance.13.8%March 31, 2023Not applicable
New indicator

The financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary spending for Development, Peace and Security Programming

The following table shows, for Development, Peace and Security Programming, budgetary spending for 2022-23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)2022–23 planned spending2023–24 planned spending2024–25 planned spending
4,662,048,6064,662,048,6064,660,336,4664,690,211,824

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Development, Peace and Security Programming

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022-23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 planned full-time equivalents2023–24 planned full-time equivalents2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
1,1721,1391,125

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Help for Canadians Abroad

Description

Global Affairs Canada provides timely and appropriate consular services for Canadians abroad, contributing to their safety and security.

Planning highlights

The global context in which consular services are provided has become significantly more complex and challenging as illustrated by recent world events, including high-profile consular cases and the COVID-19 pandemic. As risks inherent to international travel have also become compounded, Global Affairs Canada is increasing its readiness to assist clients and their families and to help Canadians travelling, living and working abroad who may be affected by sudden travel restrictions.

The department plays an important role in supporting Canadians in all their diversity and in line with Canada’s feminist foreign policy, through international engagement, diplomacy and advocacy in a rapidly changing international landscape. Despite frequent emergencies affecting Canadians in more dangerous locations, the department is committed to strengthening and improving client-focused services to meet their needs, including the provision of consular and emergency services in both official languages. This means ensuring appropriate assistance to clients, including women, children, members of the LGBTQ2+ community and those dealing with mental health issues. It also means implementing important initiatives dedicated to gender equality and working on complex issues such as force marriage, gender-based violence, sexual assault and child abductions.

Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad

Amidst uncertainties of international travel, Canadians can rely on Global Affairs Canada to provide timely and relevant information, thereby promoting their safety and ensuring they can make informed decisions. The department will actively engage with Canadians by sharing information through multiple online platforms and providing ongoing updates and recommendations during international crises and significant events. The Travel Advice and Advisories portal is the most credible source of information that travellers can rely on for up-to-date travel information. It is complemented by the department’s social media messages and those sent via the Registration of Canadians Abroad system, the 24/7 support from the Emergency Watch and Response Centre, and Canada’s global network of consular officials. Canada’s consular services help prepare Canadians for international travel and keep them informed in the event of an emergency.

Global Affairs Canada will continue developing its whole-of-government international emergency preparedness and response capacity to deliver timely consular services, including in locations where the Government of Canada has limited presence. This includes through enhancing and leveraging domestic and international partnerships to support consular policy development and consular services provision and enhance Canada’s response to international crises. As such, the department will support its advocacy efforts through the creation of a consular advocacy initiative fund to further enable consular teams to inform foreign governments and stakeholders on issues affecting the safety of Canadians.

New consular brand

A new consular brand will facilitate the recognition of Canada’s consular services and equip Canada’s global network of consular officials with high-quality products to support active engagement.

Global Affairs Canada will also maintain, develop, disseminate and implement policies, plans, frameworks and guidelines to ensure resilience measures are in place throughout all phases of an emergency management process. In continuing to provide comprehensive security and emergency management training, exercise and awareness programs to ensure readiness and responsiveness at missions and headquarters, Global Affairs Canada will ensure its employees are prepared and ready to assist Canadians abroad. When Canadians are affected by a crisis or emergency event abroad, the department’s highly trained and capable team of emergency core responders will be ready 24/7 to assist Canadians.

Global Affairs Canada will pursue its efforts to modernize consular service delivery to Canadians through the ongoing maintenance and enhancements of the new case, contact and emergency management system, launched in 2021. Close collaboration with the consular network will ensure that the system continues to evolve with the requirements of the program.

Lastly, the department will work to expand the broad coalition of states supporting the Declaration Against Arbitrary Detention in State-to-State Relations, implement the Partnership Action Plan and advance an action plan for collective response to individual cases. Canada will convene international partners at an arbitrary detention initiative conference in 2022 to accelerate efforts, assess progress achieved and plan the way forward for the initiative.

Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services

Global Affairs Canada will continue to provide timely and appropriate consular services to Canadians, including those in potentially vulnerable situations, including women, children, those dealing with mental health issues and members of the Indigenous and LGBTQ2+ communities.

Following established service standards, the department has responded to the global pandemic by adjusting the ways consular officials receive and interact with Canadians to maintain access to essential services. As the global pandemic further evolves, Global Affairs Canada will continue to deliver consular services in a manner that reflects the needs of Canadians and local public health conditions.

The department will adapt, develop and implement new policies, tools and guidance to better respond to the needs of vulnerable clients, as well as target training products to support the learning needs of the consular network. These will include a focus on financial assistance, mental health and distress cases, and efforts to provide tailored and appropriate support to the needs of vulnerable clients. In light of the passage of Bill C-4, which bans conversion therapy, the department is developing a policy to support the delivery of consular services in cases where Canadians, including minors, are taken abroad and subjected to behavior modification practices. It will also strengthen its honorary consul program to enhance and modernize the oversight and guidance provided to missions and honorary consuls. Lastly, the department will increase standardization in the consular network, continue efforts toward gender parity as well as diversity, equity and inclusion, and work toward appointing honorary consuls in more locations.

Global Affairs Canada delivers passport and citizenship services on behalf of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada to Canadians abroad. The department will continue to contribute to the effective governance and support the modernization of the passport and citizenship programs to allow timely and consistent access to passport and travel document services to Canadians working, living or travelling abroad. These services are key enablers for Canadians who choose to live, study or travel abroad, and support the provision of consular services.

Planned results for Help for Canadians Abroad

The following table shows, for Help for Canadians Abroad, the planned results, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022-23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Departmental resultDepartmental result indicatorTargetDate to achieve target2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
2020–21
actual result
Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.Number of Canadians who use the department’s travel outreach products, including digital initiatives.5% increase in annual unique page views of Travel.gc.ca 2% increase in total number of installations of Travel Smart app annually 2% increase in social media followers 2% increase in participation in outreach activitiesMarch 31, 20238% increase to 17,400,000 visits to Travel.gc.ca 29% increase to 108,437 downloads of Travel Smart app 9% increase to 344,740 social media followers76.67% increase to 30,730,857 visits to Travel.gc.ca 141% increase to 30,829 iOS installations 92% increase to 20,621 Android installations 18% increase to 407,024 social media followers9.7% decrease to 27,899,927 visits to Travel.gc.ca 555% decrease to 5,550 iOS downloads of Travel Smart app 352% decrease to 5,855 Android downloads of Travel Smart app 25.9% increase to 512,447 social media followers
Percentage of consular cases actioned within the established service standards.90%March 31, 2023Not applicable New indicator97% received an initial response within 1 business day 98% contacted within 1 month of detention 95% contacted within 1 month of sentencing 95% contacted within 3 months after transfer Annually: 95%97% received an initial response within 1 business day 89% contacted within 1 month of detention 91% contacted within 1 month of sentencing  100% contacted within 3 months after transfer Annually: 97%
Number of Canadians who have been assisted through the 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre.Not applicableFootnote 940,102 calls handled 66,627 e-mails handled 29,646 cases managed126,446 calls handled 38,435 e-mails handled 7,080 cases managed120,383 calls handled 152,818 e-mails handled 6,805 cases managed
Number of employees trained and available to deploy in response to a crisis.1290 people trained and 50 exercises completedMarch 31, 2023Not applicable New indicator2,377 employees participated in emergency management training and exercises. 130 exercises were completed
Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services.Percentage of Canadian clients who expressed satisfaction with the service(s) received.90%March 31, 202394%95%90%
Percentage of passport applications that are processed within service standards90%March 31, 2023Passports: 94% Citizenship: 82%Passports: Regular 97.5% Temporary 99.5% Emergency 99.4% Citizenship N/A Specialized services: Private financial services 90% Notarial services 96%Passports: Regular 94% Temporary 99% Emergency 97% Citizenship N/A Specialized services: Private financial services 100% Notarial services 96%

The financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary spending for Help for Canadians Abroad

The following table shows, for Help for Canadians Abroad, budgetary spending for 2022-23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)2022–23 planned spending2023–24 planned spending2024–25 planned spending
52,693,59452,693,59452,111,11052,120,857

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Help for Canadians Abroad

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022-23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 planned full-time equivalents2023–24 planned full-time equivalents2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
374370369

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad

Description

Global Affairs Canada manages and delivers resources, infrastructure and services enabling Canada’s presence abroad, including at embassies, high commissions and consulates.

Planning highlights

Global Affairs Canada continues to demonstrate resilience as it continues to support a more robust and agile network of missions, embassies, high commissions and consulates amid the ongoing pandemic. The department will continue to increase its capacity to deliver its services digitally and with more enhanced collaboration capabilities, so employees can better serve Canadians through missions abroad and at home. This includes continuing to deliver modern capabilities using cloud-based solutions as well as providing more efficient common service delivery to federal departments at missions. These efforts will be pursued with particular attention to accessibility, diversity, equity and inclusion, mental health and well-being, in line with the feminist foreign policy.

Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure and services enables Canada’s presence abroad

Canada’s presence in missions abroad goes beyond the employees of Global Affairs Canada and locally engaged staff; it can also include other government departments providing services to Canadians and representing Canada’s interests. Global Affairs Canada provides common services to support Canada’s diverse representatives at missions so that Canada’s objectives are attained in a seamless and cost-effective way. The department will continue to improve its management and delivery of common services, improve its real property portfolio and modernize its business processes in 2022-23.

Global Affairs Canada’s Digital Strategy will modernize mission networks, positioning the department to be digitally enabled and more secure over the long term. The Strategy will focus on continuing to develop user-centred digital solutions through strengthened strategic partnerships fostering a client-focused culture within the department. The department will also expand its Digital Strategy with its new community of digital champions, who will promote modern self-serve skills, behaviours and best practices that will be enabled by cloud platforms. The department will continue to evolve its cloud-based solutions to enable modern program and service delivery for Canadians. This will ensure that the department’s digital offerings meet the evolving requirements of GAC business users in a more cost-effective and secure way, further improving the ability of its employees to serve Canadians around the world.

Global Affairs Canada will continue to expand the Virtual Mission Model, which aims to build a more secure, cloud-capable and collaboration-friendly network architecture. This will benefit the user experience globally, helping to enable digital adoption across the Government of Canada. The department will also continue to promote digital innovation that explores new ways to transform its operations to better serve Canadians.

In support of greening its operations and contributing to the Government of Canada’s sustainability goals and climate change commitments, Global Affairs Canada is continuing efforts to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and overall environmental footprint through the implementation of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2020-23 and the Government of Canada’s Greening Government Strategy. The department will continue its progress on the application of green building certification assessment standards, such as the Building Owners and Managers Association’s Building Environmental Standards, building on existing greening efforts at headquarters and missions abroad.

Other greening initiatives being implemented to reduce the department’s carbon footprint include reducing energy consumption, carbon emissions and water consumption; planning for climate resilience; establishing internal carbon pricing; reducing printing in all offices and missions abroad; waste and landfill diversion through recycling and composting programs; and engaging in sustainable procurement practices by ensuring that commodities procured from environmentally sustainable manufacturers can be reused, repaired or recycled and that hazardous chemicals can be disposed of in a sustainable manner.

Global Affairs Canada is committed to improve the quality and efficiency of services for Government of Canada employees at missions through ongoing engagement with both locally engaged staff (LES) and Canada-based staff (CBS). The LES People Management Framework Reform will continue with its multi-year plan to improve the management of this large and diverse workforce. The focus for 2022-23 will continue to be on foundational pieces of staffing and employment, labour relations and recourse, as well as new areas such as competencies, performance and learning. Following the completion of a comprehensive global review of the LES social security, pension and insurance benefits program, the implementation of a multi-year LES benefits modernization initiative will continue to progress in an effort to move away from system inequities and toward a more standardized, systemic approach to LES benefits design, delivery and governance.

Global Affairs Canada is committed to fostering a healthier work environment that helps to support employees’ mental health and well-being. The department is also working to remove systemic barriers, unconscious biases and discrimination to further support diversity, equity and inclusion in its workplace through its Diversity and Inclusion Council and the Anti-racism Secretariat.

Personnel are safe, missions are more secure, and government and partner assets and information are protected

While the Government of Canada embraces digital transformation and new ways of working, keeping sensitive information safe is a growing challenge due to the increasing security risk related to the theft of sensitive information and assets, as well as the vulnerability of technical or physical facilities. As a result, Global Affairs Canada is enhancing its cyber security capabilities and upgrading its IT security and infrastructure to better prevent, detect and respond to cyber threats on networks, platforms and devices. It is also continuing to modernize security to focus on data-level protection and zero-trust architecture.

Global Affairs Canada will continue its assessment of mission vulnerabilities abroad to provide security recommendations, ranging from physical security upgrades, equipment and programs to operational security improvements. It will also implement related security measures to strengthen the department’s security posture against the evolving global threat environment in which it operates. The department will continue to implement the 10-year Duty of Care initiative, launched in 2017, aimed at improving the infrastructure, readiness and information security at its missions abroad. These activities consist of additional security measures, selected and prioritized for implementation according to real-time security risks, to protect people, assets and information at Canadian missions abroad.

Ensuring the health, safety and security for personnel who work and live abroad amid the pandemic remains a high priority for Global Affairs Canada. The department will continue to support, resource and strengthen its Vaccine Program to ensure that personnel abroad and their dependants have access to the COVID-19 vaccine under the department’s overall duty of care responsibilities, which includes having reasonable access to health care. The department will continue to provide personnel with the tools and technologies to work remotely as well as the required protective equipment (e.g. face masks, hand sanitizer) when working in the office.

Planned results for Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad

The following table shows, for Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad, the planned results, the result indicators, the targets and the target dates for 2022-23, and the actual results for the three most recent fiscal years for which actual results are available.

Departmental resultDepartmental result indicatorTargetDate to achieve target2018–19
actual result
2019–20
actual result
2020–21
actual result
Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.Percentage of partner organizations, indicating the resources, infrastructure, and services provided abroad met their needs.75%March 31, 202372%79%73%
Percentage of the replacement value of the department’s real property portfolio spent on repairs, maintenance, and recapitalization.2%March 31, 20231.4%1.6%1.2%
Percentage of Crown-owned properties abroad that were rated in good and fair condition based on the condition categories in the Directory of Federal Real Property.85%March 31, 202388%90%86%
Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.Proportion of security risk mitigation measures that address the priority risks identified in the Departmental Security Plan that are implemented.75%March 31, 2023Not applicable New indicator56%

The financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary spending for Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad

The following table shows, for Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad, budgetary spending for 2022-23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)2022–23 planned spending2023–24 planned spending2024–25 planned spending
1,202,126,6461,202,126,6461,196,678,2621,161,835,716

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to fulfill this core responsibility for 2022-23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 planned full-time equivalents2023–24 planned full-time equivalents2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
4,6534,6384,635

Financial, human resources and performance information for Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Internal services: planned results

Description

Internal services are the services that are provided within a department so that it can meet its corporate obligations and deliver its programs. There are 10 categories of internal services:

Planning highlights

The smooth and efficient operation of the department’s internal services is foundational to the achievement of its overall mandate and results. During the pandemic, the department has adapted quickly to modernize its overall internal operations to deliver on its international mandate. As the international and domestic environments become more complex, so too must Global Affairs Canada adapt how it operates to ensure that it can meet both current and future challenges. In this context, the department will focus its efforts and resources on four critical corporate priorities in 2022-23 and beyond:

Sustain COVID response and prepare for future pandemics: Through integrating the evolving COVID-19 context into business planning to position the organization to respond effectively to current and future challenges, the department will maintain organizational resilience in the face of future pandemics.

Strengthen operations and asset management: Through enabling business practices that are agile and infrastructure that is sustainable and responsive to emerging opportunities, the department will implement systematic approaches to evolve GAC’s future footprint, modernize financial management and investment planning, transform the grants and contributions process and green government operations.

Develop the workforce of the future: Through its skilled, diverse, flexible and high-performing workforce, supported by responsive human resources systems and structures, the department will increase diversity, equity and inclusion, strategically manage talent to maximize future workforce, and increase management and workforce agility.

Enable a digital transformation: Through transforming the department’s services, workplace, workforce and infrastructure, Global Affairs Canada will establish an enterprise-wide digital strategy that will prepare it to meet the challenges of the future.

Enterprise risk management

To better support the advancement of its priorities in 2022-23, Global Affairs Canada will continue to implement its new Enterprise Risk Management Strategy and leverage data and evidence to manage risk at all levels. Corporately, efforts will focus on addressing the department’s top strategic risks, which have been impacted by the pandemic and a variety of external forces. The majority of the department’s top strategic risks relate to human resources and information technology, including health, safety and wellbeing of employees and cyber/digital security. Risk-mitigation efforts in these areas of focus will enable the department to promote the sound management of people, finances and assets; protect, detect and respond to cyber vulnerabilities; and shift to new modes of digital service delivery to support agility, decision making and stewardship of assets. Global Affairs Canada’s senior management will be strongly engaged to monitor the department’s responses to these risks on a regular basis and review the department’s top strategic and emerging risks regularly.

Planned budgetary spending for internal services

The following table shows, for internal services, budgetary spending for 2022-23, as well as planned spending for that year and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)2022–23 planned spending2023–24 planned spending2024–25 planned spending
272,488,656272,488,656267,748,893266,228,676

Planned human resources for internal services

The following table shows, in full‑time equivalents, the human resources the department will need to carry out its internal services for 2022-23 and for each of the next two fiscal years.

2022–23 planned full-time equivalents2023–24 planned full-time equivalents2024–25 planned full-time equivalents
1,9741,9421,942

Planned spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three fiscal years and compares planned spending for 2022-23 with actual spending for the current year and the previous year.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2019-20 to 2024-25

The following graph presents planned spending (voted and statutory expenditures) over time.

Figure 01
Alternative text
Planned spending2019-20202020-20212021-20222022-20232023-20242024-2025
Statutory442.5601.9382.3381.3380.0379.7
Voted6,734.58,739.87,672.57,087.87,041.97,033.7
Total7,176.99,341.78,054.87,469.17,421.87,413.3

From 2021-22 to 2024-25, Global Affairs Canada’s spending profile varies from $8.1 billion in 2021-22 to $7.4 billion in 2024-25.

Significant items contributing to the decrease of $641.4 million include the following:

These decreases are offset by an increase of the following:

Expenditures for 2019-20 and 2020-21 reflect the financial information previously reported in the Departmental Results Reports and the Public Accounts.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and internal services (dollars)

The following table shows information on spending for each of Global Affairs Canada’s core responsibilities and for its internal services for 2022–23 and other relevant fiscal years.

Core responsibilities and internal services2019–20 actual expenditures2020–21 actual expenditures2021–22 forecast spending2022–23 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates)2022–23 planned spending2023–24 planned spending2024–25 planned spending
1. International Advocacy and Diplomacy942,662,171899,031,725885,954,902904,561,152904,561,152897,217,339896,194,758
2. Trade and Investment350,954,383331,958,395378,760,274375,140,952375,140,952347,726,111346,757,125
3. Development, Peace and Security Programming4,488,445,1286,675,018,4975,385,467,2854,662,048,6064,662,048,6064,660,336,4664,690,211,824
4. Help for Canadians Abroad76,510,527135,456,11349,370,07552,693,59452,693,59452,111,11052,120,857
5. Support for Canada's Presence Abroad1,049,692,086982,828,4181,069,532,3571,202,126,6461,202,126,6461,196,678,2621,161,835,716
Subtotal6,908,264,295 9,024,293,148 7,769,084,893 7,196,570,950 7,196,570,950 7,154,069,288 7,147,120,280
Internal services268,638,903317,413,748285,705,449272,488,656272,488,656267,748,893266,228,676
Total7,176,903,198 9,341,706,896 8,054,790,342 7,469,059,606 7,469,059,606 7,421,818,181 7,413,348,956

Planned human resources

The following table shows information on human resources, in full-time equivalents (FTEs), for each of Global Affairs Canada’s core responsibilities and for its internal services for 2022-23 and the other relevant years.

Human resources planning summary for core responsibilities and internal services

Core responsibilities and internal services2019–20 actual full‑time equivalents2020–21 actual full‑time equivalents2021–22 actual full‑time equivalents2022–23 actual full‑time equivalents2022–23 actual full‑time equivalents2023–24 actual full‑time equivalents2024–25 actual full‑time equivalents
1. International Advocacy and Diplomacy2,3192,3422,3992,4902,4692,465
2. Trade and Investment2,0382,0772,1282,1102,0992,094
3. Development, Peace and Security Programming1,0971,1341,1351,1721,1391,125
4. Help for Canadians Abroad398405401374370369
5. Support for Canada's Presence Abroad4,4824,3454,4924,6534,6384,635
Subtotal10,334 10,303 10,555 10,799 10,715 10,688
Internal services1,8241,8731,9481,9741,9421,942
Total12,158 12,176 12,503 12,773 12,657 12,630

Estimates by vote

Information on Global Affairs Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the 2022-23 Main Estimates.

Future-oriented condensed statement of operations

The future‑oriented condensed statement of operations provides an overview of Global Affairs Canada’s operations for 2021-22 to 2022-23.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The forecast and planned amounts presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future‑oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations with the requested authorities, are available on Global Affairs Canada’s website.

Future‑oriented condensed statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2023 (in thousands of dollars)

Financial information2021–22 forecast results2022–23 planned resultsDifference
(2022–23 planned results minus
2021–22 forecast results)
Total expenses7,325,5427,088,439(237,103)
Total revenues48,03845,548(2,490)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers7,277,5047,042,891(234,613)

The decrease of $235 million (2022–23 Planned Results, when compared to the 2021–22 Forecast Results) of the Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers is mainly attributable to:

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate ministers: Mélanie Joly, Minister of Foreign Affairs; Mary Ng, Minister of International Trade, Export Promotion, Small Business and Economic Development; and Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of International Development and Minister responsible for the Pacific Economic Development Agency of Canada

Institutional head: Marta Morgan, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs; Christopher MacLennan, Deputy Minister of International Development; and David Morrison, Deputy Minister of International Trade

Ministerial portfolio: Global Affairs Canada and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service. The following federal entities operate at aim’s length and report to Parliament through the Global Affairs Canada ministers: the Canadian Commercial Corporation, Export Development Canada, the International Development Research Centre, and Invest in Canada

Enabling instrument: Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Act, S.C. 2013, c. 33, s. 174

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1909

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Information on Global Affairs Canada’s raison d’être, mandate and role is available on the department’s website.

Information on Global Affairs Canada’s mandate letter commitments is available in the Ministers’ mandate letters.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on Global Affairs Canada’s website.

Reporting framework

Global Affairs Canada’s approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2022-23 are as follows.

Core Responsibility 1: International Advocacy and Diplomacy

Departmental Results Framework

Departmental ResultIndicator
Canada builds and maintains constructive relationships that advance Canada’s interests.Percentage of advocacy campaigns which met their stated objectives.
Percentage of diplomatic activities which met their stated objectives.
Number of international commitments through which Canada works with partners to address strategic peace and security challenges.
Canada’s leadership on global issues contributes to a just and inclusive world.Number of influencers and decision-makers reached through Canadian-hosted events, including events on women’s empowerment and rights and gender equality.
Percentage of Canadian-led decisions introduced through international and regional organizations that are accepted.
Number of Canadians in leadership positions in international institutions.
Canada helps build strong international institutions and respect for international law.Percentage of organizations of which Canada is a member, which receive a positive performance rating on any independent evaluation.
Number of actions that are led or supported by Canada which support strengthened adherence to international law.
Degree to which Canadian positions on international legal issues are reflected in the outcome of discussions and negotiations, such as agreements, arrangements and resolutions.
Canada’s global influence is expanded and strengthened.Ranking of Canada’s global presence as reflected by our participation in the global economy, our military presence and our people-to-people ties.
Ranking of Canada’s reputation abroad as reported in global opinion polls.
Percentage of Canadians who are satisfied with Canada’s international engagement.

Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 2: Trade and Investment

Departmental Results Framework

Departmental ResultIndicator
Canada helps to build and safeguard an open and inclusive rules-based global trading system.Degree to which Canada opens markets and advances trade policy innovations through negotiations, agreements and discussions.
Degree to which Canada works to resolve or mitigate market access barriers, disputes or other strategic policy issues.
Percentage of applications for permits and certificates related to trade controls processed in accordance with service standards.
Canadian exporters and innovators are successful in their international business development efforts.Percentage of clients indicating satisfaction with the quality of services delivered by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Number of active business clients of the Trade Commissioner Service.
Value of Canada’s goods and services exports (in dollars).
Number of Canadian exporters.
Value of exports to overseas markets.
Number of concluded commercial agreements facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Number of international research and innovation partnerships facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.
Foreign direct investment is facilitated, expanded or retained.Number of new foreign investments and expansions of existing foreign investments in Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service. 
Indicator: Number of investor visits to Canada facilitated by the Trade Commissioner Service.

Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 3: Development, Peace and Security Programming

Departmental Results Framework

Departmental ResultIndicator
Improved physical, social and economic well-being for the poorest and most vulnerable, particularly for women and girls, in countries where Canada engages.Number of people trained in demand driven, technical and vocational education and training.
Number of people reached with nutrition-specific interventions.
Number of entrepreneurs, farmers and smallholders (m/f) provided with financial and/or business development services through GAC-funded projects.
Number of individuals with an enhanced awareness, knowledge or skills to promote women’s participation and leadership in public life.
Number of beneficiaries (m/f) from climate adaptation projects supported by GAC.
Enhanced empowerment and rights for women and girls in countries where Canada engages.Number of people reached by GAC-funded projects that help prevent, respond to and end sexual and gender-based violence, including child, early and forced marriage and/or Female Genital Mutilation.
Number of women’s organizations and women’s networks advancing women's rights and gender equality that receive GAC support for programming and/or institutional strengthening.
Reduced suffering and increased human dignity in communities experiencing humanitarian crises.Number of beneficiaries that receive emergency food and nutrition assistance in relation to need and in consideration of international response.
Number of refugees and internally displaced persons assisted and protected.
Number of people who have received sexual and reproductive health services, including access to contraception, through a humanitarian response delivered by Civil Society Organizations.
Improved peace and security in countries and regions where Canada engages.Percentage of international assistance that targets fragile and conflict-affected states.
Number of Canadian supported interventions taken by partners to prevent, detect and/or respond to crime, terrorism, and the proliferation of weapons, including weapons of mass destruction and related materials.
The amount of international assistance funds ($) invested by Global Affairs Canada in international and national efforts to investigate and prosecute crimes committed in situations of violent conflict, including crimes involving sexual and gender-based violence.
Canada’s international assistance is made more effective by leveraging diverse partnerships, innovation, and experimentation.Number of new partners that receive GAC support for programming in the delivery of international assistance, disaggregated by type.
Percentage of initiatives implementing  innovative solutions  in the delivery of international assistance.

Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 4: Help for Canadians abroad

Departmental Results Framework

Departmental ResultIndicator
Canadians have timely access to information and services that keeps them safer abroad.Number of Canadians who use the department’s travel outreach products, including digital initiatives.
Percentage of consular cases actioned within the established service standards.
Number of Canadians who have been assisted through the 24/7 Emergency Watch and Response Centre.
Number of employees trained and available to deploy in response to a crisis.
Canadians abroad receive timely and appropriate government services.Percentage of Canadian clients who expressed satisfaction with the service(s) received.
Percentage of passport applications that are processed within service standards.

Program Inventory

Core Responsibility 5: Support for Canada’s Presence Abroad

Departmental Results Framework

Sound management and delivery of resources, infrastructure, and services enables Canada’s presence abroad.Percentage of partner organizations, indicating the resources, infrastructure, and services provided abroad met their needs.
Percentage of the replacement value of the department’s real property portfolio spent on repairs, maintenance, and recapitalization.
Percentage of Crown-owned properties abroad that were rated in good and fair condition based on the condition categories in the Directory of Federal Real Property.
Personnel are safe, missions are more secure and government and partner assets and information are protected.Number of security risk mitigation measures that address the priority risks identified in the Departmental Security Plan that are implemented.

Program Inventory

Program Inventory

Internal Services

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Global Affairs Canada’s program inventory is available on GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Global Affairs Canada’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

Global Affairs Canada’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government­‑wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis plus.

Organizational contact information

Mailing address

Global Affairs Canada

Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
TTY: 1-800-394-3472 (toll-free from the U.S. and Canada only); 613-944-1310 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709

https://www.international.gc.ca/

Enquiries Services

Global Affairs Canada
125 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, ON K1A 0G2

Email: enqserv@international.gc.ca
Tel.: 1-800-267-8376 (toll-free in Canada);
613-944-4000 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-996-9709

Other Portfolio Related Contacts

Canadian Commercial Corporation

350 Albert Street, 7th Floor
Ottawa, ON K1A 0S6

Tel.: 1-800-748-8191 (toll-free in Canada);
613-996-0034 (National Capital Region and outside Canada)
Fax: 613-995-2121

www.ccc.ca

International Joint Commission (Canadian Section)

234 Laurier Avenue West, 22nd Floor
Ottawa, ON K1P 6K6

Tel.: 613-995-2984
Fax: 613-993-5583

www.ijc.org

Export Development Canada

150 Slater Street
Ottawa, ON K1A 1K3

Tel.: 1-800-229-0575 (toll-free in North America);
613-598-2500 (local)
TTY: 1-866-574-0451
Fax: 613-598-3811

www.edc.ca

Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission

459 Route 774
Welshpool, NB E5E 1A4

Tel.: 1-877-851-6663 (toll-free)
506-752-2922 (local)
Fax: 506-752-6000

www.fdr.net

International Development Research Centre

150 Kent Street
Ottawa, ON K1P 0B2

Postal address: P.O. Box 8500
Ottawa, ON K1G 3H9

Tel.: 613-236-6163
Fax: 613-238-7230

www.idrc.ca

Invest in Canada

www.investcanada.ca

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A document that sets out a department’s priorities, programs, expected results and associated resource requirements, covering a three‑year period beginning with the year indicated in the title of the report. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

departmental result (résultat ministériel)

A change that a department seeks to influence. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.

departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on a department’s actual performance in a fiscal year against its plans, priorities and expected results set out in its Departmental Plan for that year. Departmental Results Reports are usually tabled in Parliament each fall.

experimentation (expérimentation)

The conducting of activities that explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform decision-making and improve outcomes for Canadians. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from, innovation. Innovation is the trying of something new; experimentation involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, introducing a new mobile application to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new application and comparing it against an existing website or other tools to see which one reaches more people, is experimentation.

full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA Plus) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS Plus])

An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2022–23 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities are the high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2021 Speech from the Throne: protecting Canadians from COVID-19; helping Canadians through the pandemic; building back better – a resiliency agenda for the middle class; the Canada we’re fighting for.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)

What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within a department and that focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

program inventory (répertoire des programmes)

An inventory of a department’s programs that describes how resources are organized to carry out the department’s core responsibilities and achieve its planned results.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead, they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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