Technical Assistance Handbook

It is imperative that this Handbook be read in conjunction with these definitions.

Effective February 1, 2005, the provisions of the Technical Assistance Handbook replace all previous versions of "Management of Overseas Personnel: Manual for the Executing Agency".

For any questions concerning the terms of this Handbook, the cooperant, the executing agency or the advisor via the executing agency, must contact the Technical Assistance Unit at CIDA. Only CIDA's Technical Assistance Unit is authorized to interpret this Handbook where it is unclear or does not cover a particular circumstance.

In cases of alleged misinterpretation or misapplication arising out of this Handbook by the cooperant, advisor or executing agency, the costs incurred shall be the responsibility of the cooperant, advisor or executing agency.

If you have any questions or comments regarding this Handbook, please contact us.

  • E-mail: cooperant@acdi-cida.gc.ca
  • Fax: (819) 994-5395
  • Mailing Address: Canadian International Development Agency
  • Technical Assistance Unit (CMD)
  • 200 Promenade du Portage, 8th floor
  • Gatineau, Québec
  • K1A 0G4

Chapter 1 - General

1.1 Purpose of the Handbook

The Technical Assistance Handbook, hereafter referred to as the "Handbook", is a guide for the application of the Technical Assistance Regulations (TAR), the authority by which the Canadian International Development Agency may retain the services of Canadian cooperants for services in developing countries and countries in transition, and pay them specified expenses and benefits. It is CIDA's policy that expenses and benefits payable to long-term personnel overseas on CIDA-funded projects shall not exceed those allowable under the provisions of the TAR. Therefore, CIDA has extended the provisions of this Handbook to executing agency advisors.

The provisions of this Handbook are effective February 1, 2005, and replace all previous versions of the Handbook for Cooperants and the publication Management of Overseas Personnel: Manual for the Executing Agency.

1.2 Amendments to the Handbook

CIDA may, at any time, amend the provisions of the Handbook as a result of changes in policies and/or procedures. The Handbook, including amendments, are located on the Internet (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). CIDA will contact cooperants when there are amendments to the Handbook. Executing agencies who wish to be put on a contact list to be notified of amendments, should inform the Technical Assistance Unit (see Chapter 1.10 for the address).

1.3 Cooperant Contract

This Handbook forms part of the cooperant's contract. In the event of conflict between the provisions of this Handbook and those included in the cooperant's contract, the latter shall prevail.


1.4 Extent of Application

This Handbook applies to persons having a cooperant contract with CIDA. This Handbook may apply to an advisor if the executing agency's contract with CIDA stipulates the application of the provisions of the Handbook to its personnel assigned overseas. Before applying this Handbook, the executing agency must ensure that their contract with CIDA refers to this Handbook or to the publication "Management of Overseas Personnel: Manual for the Executing Agency". The Handbook should always be read in conjunction with the contract, and, in the event of any conflict between the two, the provisions of the contract shall prevail.

A federal public servant, on leave with pay, hired as a cooperant/advisor is governed by the Foreign Service Directives (FSD). Any executing agency hiring a federal government employee on leave with pay must be prepared to administer the benefits in accordance with the FSD. The benefits outlined in this Handbook do not apply to a federal public servant.

The provisions of this Handbook provide for the cooperant's/advisor's legitimate expenses related to the assignment outside Canada, without opening the way for personal gain or for the underwriting of non allowable benefits and expenses. The rationale behind the TAR is to cover costs directly attributable to the assignment outside Canada, and not to cover costs that would have been incurred had the cooperant/advisor remained in Canada. Individuals engaged on long-term assignments outside Canada should receive the same basic benefits as individuals working overseas in the same country but on different CIDA projects.

The executing agency may provide some or all of the benefits outlined in this Handbook, but shall not exceed the individual benefits, taken separately. Advisors must verify their contracts with the executing agency to ascertain which of these benefits apply.

1.4.1 Individuals recruited in Canada as cooperants or advisors

Individuals recruited as cooperants/advisors for an assignment outside Canada must be Canadian citizens or permanent residents with a contract address (see definition) in Canada. Individuals on continuous assignment may be recruited as cooperants or advisors.

A permanent resident may lose Canadian residency status if living outside Canada for extended periods of time. The cooperant/advisor should contact Citizenship and Immigration Canada for further information (see Section 1.10 for the Internet address).

These individuals are cooperants/advisors and the benefits package set out in this Handbook applies to these individuals.

1.4.2 Locally-recruited personnel

Although CIDA has in the past had strict rules requiring the recruitment of Canadians only, there is an increasing use of local and third-country personnel. It is sometimes both appropriate and cost-effective to recruit personnel already residing in the country where the project takes place.

Locally recruited personnel may be Canadian or non-Canadian. These individuals are not cooperants or advisors and are not entitled to any of the benefits in this Handbook. They should be engaged according to local salary scales and regulations.

1.4.3 Individuals recruited in a third country

It may happen that a person who is a resident neither of Canada nor of the country of assignment is the most suitable candidate for a position. This individual is not a cooperant or an advisor. The remuneration and benefits should be negotiated on an individual basis by comparing the conditions in the person's usual country of residence (e.g. availability of free health care, public education, cost of living) to those in the country of assignment.

Benefits offered to individuals recruited in a third-country shall not exceed the individual benefits, taken separately, outlined in this Handbook.

1.5 Interpretation

For any questions concerning the terms of this Handbook, the cooperant, the executing agency or the advisor via the executing agency must contact the Technical Assistance Unit at CIDA (see Chapter 1.10 for the Technical Assistance Unit coordinates). Only CIDA's Technical Assistance Unit is authorized to interpret this Handbook where it is unclear or does not cover a particular circumstance.

In cases of alleged misinterpretation or misapplication arising out of this Handbook by the cooperant, advisor or executing agency, the costs incurred shall be the responsibility of the cooperant, advisor or executing agency.

1.6 Cooperant/Advisor Couple

All cases where the spouse/common-law partner works as a cooperant/advisor are treated on an individual basis at the time of contract negotiation. The following guidelines must be applied where both spouses/common-law partners are governed by the TAR, or where one is governed by the TAR and the other by the Foreign Service Directives (FSD) or where one is governed by the TAR and the other by any similar regulation, government or non-government.

  1. The same benefits cannot be granted twice (no overlap).
  2. Benefits for dependants, including the spouse/common-law partner, may be claimed by only one spouse/common-law partner. Before the contract is signed, a declaration must be completed to clearly identify all dependants who will be receiving benefits under the contract. This declaration must form part of the contract.
  3. Where both spouses/common-law partners are governed by this Handbook, the one who declares the dependants is entitled to the benefits under this Handbook for the family, except that the spouse/common-law partner is not considered a dependant in calculating the overseas allowances. The other spouse/common-law partner receives only the basic fee, pension plan contribution, if applicable, and overseas allowances at the unaccompanied rate.
  4. Where one spouse/common-law partner is governed by this Handbook and the other by the FSD, the person governed by the FSD must declare all the dependants including the spouse/common-law partner and is entitled to the benefits under the FSD for the family. The person governed by the FSD shall pay a shelter cost based on the total number of dependants in the household. The other spouse/common-law partner is not considered a dependant in calculating the overseas allowances. The person governed by this Handbook receives only the basic fee, pension plan contribution, if applicable, and the overseas allowances at the unaccompanied rate.

1.7 Conduct in the Country of Assignment

1.7.1 Canada's image overseas

The cooperant/advisor contributes to determining the image Canada projects abroad. They are expected, as well as their accompanying dependants, to conduct themselves in a way that creates a favourable image of Canada. Official Government of Canada representational activities are the responsibility of the Embassy or High Commission staff who are covered under different regulations, enabling them to carry out official representation.

1.7.2 Local laws and customs

  1. The cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants must comply with the laws and regulations of the country of assignment, particularly the employment regulations and highway code. They should not expect, by virtue of their status or nationality, different treatment from the local authorities than is given to citizens of the country of assignment. Cooperants and advisors are not diplomats therefore they are not covered by diplomatic immunity.
  2. Generally, the cooperant/advisor will observe the hours and days of work established by the Canadian local authorities. However, in certain country of assignments, the CIDA Field Representative may advise that a combined schedule of local and Canadian statutory holidays be followed.

1.7.3 Professional discretion

The cooperant/advisor agrees not to disclose any confidential or classified information acquired during the assignment, except with the prior written approval of CIDA.

1.8 New or Extended Assignments

A cooperant/advisor whose assignment is extended, or who takes on a new assignment in the same city of assignment, immediately following the previous assignment without a break in service, is considered to be on a period of "continuous assignment" (see definitions). In such cases, no extra shipping entitlements are granted and relocation travel to Canada does not apply.

A cooperant/advisor who is cross posted to another city of assignment, without a break in service, is considered to be on a period of continuous assignment; therefore, relocation provisions apply.

For a continuous assignment, the cooperant/advisor retains credit for the total length of time for the purposes of calculating Vacation Travel Assistance (see Section 5.4).

1.9 Break in Service During the Period of Contract

If for any reason there is a break in service during the period of the contract, such as a period of leave without remuneration, parental/maternity leave, etc., the definition of "continuous assignment" will no longer apply. During this break in service, no fees or benefits or any other provision of this Handbook, including housing and related costs, shall be applicable, payable or accumulated under the contract or this Handbook.

Frequency of entitlements to benefits such as Vacation Travel Assistance and Family Reunion Travel shall be applied as if the date of return from the break in service is a new assignment. (example for Vacation Travel Assistance: The cooperant/advisor must have 24 months continuous assignment after return from the break in service to be entitled to one VTA).

1.10 Reference Addresses

CIDA

Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook

CIDA's policy on annual fee and salary increases

Vendor Electronic Payment Registration Request

Treasury Board

Security forms: "Personnel Screening, Consent and Authorization"

Security Clearance

Meal and incidental rates in Canada and abroad, please refer to Treasury Board Travel Directive

Canada and the USA rates

In-Canada kilometre rates for business use of personal vehicles. Treasury Board Travel Directive

International kilometre rates for business use of personal vehicles. Foreign Affairs Canada Kilometre Rates at Locations Abroad

Other

Public Works and Government Services Canada web site for some approved hotel rates internationally and in North America

The Centre for Intercultural Learning

  • E-mail: culture@international.gc.ca
  • Telephone: 1-819-997-1197
  • Toll free (in Canada): 1-800-852-9211
  • Fax: 1-819-997-5409
  • Toll free fax (in Canada) 1-877-723-1604
  • Mailing Address: 115 Bisson Street, Gatineau Québec, J8Y 5M2

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Canada Revenue Agency (tax)

Knights of Columbus' Catholic Information Service provides online catechism courses free of charge. For information: look for Catholic Information Services (CIS).

Bank of Canada

U.S. Department of State, Office of Overseas Schools


Chapter 2 - Assignment Prerequisites

2.1 Medical Requirement and Related Information

This chapter describes the requirements which must be met before a contract shall be signed. It also describes various tasks that the cooperant/advisor must carry out, after signing the contract, in preparation for, and during, the overseas assignment. A contract shall not be signed unless the potential cooperant/advisor meets the following four requirements described in Sections 2.1.1(a), 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4 below:

  • successful medical examination, for the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants (see Chapter 2.1.1a));
  • accident and sickness insurance coverage that meets CIDA's minimum mandatory requirements, for the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants (see Chapter 2.2);
  • security clearance by CIDA's Security Services for the cooperant (and for the advisor if CIDA deems it necessary (see Chapter 2.3).
  • If applicable, visa requirements of the country of assignment for the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants (see Chapter 2.4).

2.1 Medical Requirements and Related Information

2.1.1 Before signing a contract

This section applies to all contracts including continuous assignments (see definition). For contract extensions please refer to Section 2.1.2.

  1. Medical examination
    As overseas work can be strenuous, with higher health risks, and the human and project costs associated with repatriation for medical reasons can be high, the Administrative Officer must ensure that the potential cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants undergo successful medical examinations prior to signing the contract to ensure they are physically and mentally fit for the overseas assignment. The potential cooperant and each accompanying dependant must have the medical form shown in Appendix 2 completed and signed by a physician. Executing agencies may also use the form in Appendix 2, or use their own form.
    In the event that the potential cooperant, advisor or any of their accompanying dependants do not receive medical clearance, A CONTRACT SHALL NOT BE SIGNED
  2. Vaccination
    It is the cooperant's/advisor's responsibility to obtain information and advice on the required vaccinations for the country of assignment. All cooperants/advisors and their accompanying dependants must obtain these vaccines prior to departure for the country of assignment. The cost of vaccines that are required prior to departure can be included in the claim for medical expenses (see Section 2.1.1 d) and submitted to the Administrative Officer.
  3. Confidentiality
    Note that personal medical information is protected; its disclosure is subject to the provisions of the Privacy Act.
  4. Procedures concerning reimbursement of medical expenses:
    Upon presentation of receipts, the Administrative Officer will reimburse the potential cooperant/advisor for any actual and reasonable expenses incurred for the mandatory pre-assignment medical examinations, vaccinations required for the country of assignment, travel expenses and local transportation to and from the medical facility nearest to the contract address, or nearest to the city of assignment in the case of a continuous assignment. Expenses claimed shall not exceed the provisions of the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see definition).
    For certain countries, preventative medical precautions such as vaccination against Hepatitis B or prophylactics for malaria are necessary. When prescribed preventative medication is attributable to the assignment and must be taken prior to departure for the country of assignment, the cost of the medication that must be taken up to the date of arrival in the city of assignment will be reimbursed by the Administrative Officer.

2.1.2 During assignment

  1. Annual medical examination
    The cooperant/advisor must contact their medical insurance broker for approval of the cost of an annual medical examination. The broker will decide if the examination should take place in the city of assignment or elsewhere. If the broker is not contacted beforehand, expenses related to an annual medical examination may not be reimbursed by the broker.
  2. Medical examination for contract extension
    If towards the end of an assignment, a contract extension is being considered for the same country of assignment, the cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants may be required to undergo a medical examination similar to that undergone at the beginning of the assignment. Normally, an annual medical examination, if undertaken within six (6) months prior to the extension date is acceptable.
    The cooperant/advisor must contact the medical insurance broker who will determine if and where the medical examination should take place. If the broker is not contacted beforehand, expenses related to the medical examination may not be reimbursed.
    Where a new contract will be signed in situations such as continuous assignment, successful medical examinations are required before the contract can be signed (see section 2.1.1).

    In exceptional circumstances, where the medical examination is not covered by the medical insurance broker, the cooperant/advisor may submit to the Administrative Officer a claim for reimbursement supported by receipts and proof of denial by the broker.
  3. Preventative medication
    Once in the field, the expense for prescribed preventive medication, attributable to the city of assignment, will be reimbursed by the accident and sickness insurance provider. Expensive preventive medication such as malarone shall be reimbursed by the insurance broker when such medication is deemed medically necessary by the cooperant's/advisor's physician.

    No travel costs to obtain these preventative medications in the city of assignment will be reimbursed by the Administrative Officer.

2.1.3 End of contract medical examinations

It is recommended that persons returning to Canada from an overseas assignment have a medical examination including tuberculosis testing.
For medical examinations on return, the Administrative Officer will reimburse previously approved expenses as described above in section 2.1.1d) except that the medical facility must be in Canada, nearest to the contract address. Expenses must be incurred within sixty (60) days of termination of the cooperant's/advisor's contract.

2.2 Accident and Sickness Insurance

The cooperant/advisor or the executing agency are responsible for buying insurance from an insurance broker of their choice. The cooperant/advisor may claim reimbursement of fifty percent (50%) of the cost of the mandatory minimum accident and sickness insurance coverage described in Section 2.2.1, plus one hundred percent (100%) of surcharges for exceptional conditions affecting the cooperant's/advisor's and accompanying dependant(s) health and security in the city of assignment.

The cooperant/advisor shall not enter into any legally binding obligation with any insurance broker prior to contract signature. However, prior to contract signature, arrangements must be made by the cooperant/advisor to have the insurance provider forward to the Administrative Officer, a written confirmation of insurability. The confirmation shall indicate that the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants meet CIDA's minimum mandatory accident and sickness insurance requirements as specified in section 2.2.1 and the period of the coverage.

Please note that most insurance companies will require a successful medical examination prior to providing coverage.
The cooperant/advisor must provide the Administrative Officer with confirmation of continued insurance coverage and arrange for this coverage to take effect on the day of departure from Canada with extensions to the end date of the contract. Premiums must be paid prior to departure from Canada

The cooperant/advisor must submit claims directly to the insurer. Settlement of such claims by the cooperant/advisor will not be made through CIDA. The cooperant/advisor shall contact the insurer directly for additional information.
CIDA will not assume liability for death, disease, illness, injury or disability suffered by a cooperant/advisor or their dependants as a result of, or attributable to, service abroad, or resulting from conditions encountered during the period of the cooperant's/advisor's assignment, even if CIDA provided assistance in organizing the medical evacuation.

2.1 Mandatory minimum accident and sickness insurance

The cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants must obtain the following coverage a) and b) during the assignment:

  1. Medical expense benefits of one million Canadian dollars (C$1,000,000) coverage for each person, which includes:
    1. Accident and sickness,
    2. Annual medical examination,
    3. Prescribed preventative medication for conditions or diseases prevalent in the area of the cooperant's/advisor's city of assignment,
    4. Medical evacuation: to cover costs related to a medical evacuation when the required medical care is not available locally and the evacuation is recommended by a physician; the evacuation package must include actual and reasonable transportation costs for the return to the city of assignment following an evacuation, and anyone else authorized to accompany the person evacuated, if the need arises,
    5. Maximum daily allowance for hospital room and board (ward accommodation): reasonable and customary fees in the country of assignment or at the location where the person is evacuated.
  2. Extension of medical expense benefits coverage on final return to Canada for the applicable waiting period for re-enrollment in the provincial health care plan.
    PLUS the following coverage c) and d) is required for the cooperant/advisor only:
  3. Long term disability income benefit: in case of long term disability acquired during the assignment until the claimant reaches age 65;
    • if basic annual fee is eighty thousand Canadian dollars (C$80,000) or above: sixty percent (60%) of eighty thousand Canadian dollars (C$80,000) (i.e. maximum of four thousand Canadian dollars (C$4,000) per month).
    • if basic annual fee is below eighty thousand Canadian dollars (C$80,000): sixty percent (60%) of basic annual fee (i.e. maximum of three thousand Canadian dollars (C$3,000) per month based on an annual fee of sixty thousand Canadian dollars (C$60,000)).
    Coverage must commence within 30 days following the start of the long term disability.
  4. Accidental death or dismemberment during the assignment, fifty thousand Canadian dollars (C$50,000) coverage.

2.2.2 Medical insurance for non-accompanying dependants travelling to the city of assignment

Non-accompanying dependants require the same coverage against illness, injury and medical evacuation when they travel to the city of assignment. Coverage must start no later than the day of departure from Canada and end no sooner than the day of return.

The cooperant/advisor is responsible for the costs of coverage for non-accompanying dependants and for informing the insurance company ahead of time of short-term coverage requirements.

2.2.3 Procedure for reimbursement of accident and sickness insurance premiums

The cooperant/advisor may receive reimbursement of fifty percent (50%) of the cost of the mandatory minimum basic accident and sickness insurance coverage described in Section 2.2.1, plus one hundred percent (100%) of surcharges for exceptional conditions affecting the cooperant's/advisor's and accompanying dependant(s) health and security in the city of assignment. The cooperant/advisor must have a signed contract and submit a claim to the Administrative Officer with the original paid invoice from the broker, detailing the coverage of CIDA's minimum insurance as described in Section 2.2.1.

Any advance made to the cooperant/advisor in accordance with article 2.9.2 shall be justified within 15 days after the expense has been incurred. No further advance will be made until the outstanding advance has been justified.

Costs for additional insurance coverage in excess of CIDA's required minimum insurance coverage are the responsibility of the cooperant/advisor and are not to appear on the invoice submitted for reimbursement.

2.3 Security Clearance

Note: This section is for potential cooperants only. However, in certain cases, if CIDA deems it necessary, advisors may also need a security clearance from CIDA Security Services. If a potential advisor requires a security clearance, the executing agency can complete the forms (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) and return them to the CIDA Project Officer in charge of their project, or directly to CIDA's Security Services.
Based on the sensitivity of the information and assets that the potential cooperant will have access to, the Project Manager is responsible, with assistance from CIDA's Security Services, for determining the type of personnel screening required: Reliability or Security Clearance.

Reliability is the type of screening required when the duties or tasks of a position necessitate access to information and assets designated "Protected", regardless of the duration of an assignment. An individual granted reliability status may access, on a need-to-know basis, information and assets designated "Protected".

A security clearance is the type of screening required when duties or tasks of a position necessitate access to classified information and assets (Confidential / Secret / Top Secret). An individual granted a security clearance may access, on a need-to-know basis, classified information and assets up to and including the level of security clearance granted.

Procedure
The Project Manager uses the "Personnel Screening, Consent and Authorization" form to identify the level of clearance required for the position, by completing Part A, "Administrative Information" (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).
If the Project Manager determines that a security clearance is required, the "Security Clearance" form must be completed, in addition to the "Personnel Screening, Consent and Authorization" form (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).
The Project Manager ensures that the candidate completes his/her portion of the form and returns the completed, original form(s) to CIDA's Security Services (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

2.4 VISA Requirements of the Country of Assignment

Where the country of assignment requires specific medical (e.g. HIV/AIDS) or other types of clearance prior to granting an entry visa, the Project Manager shall not enter into a contract with the cooperant/advisor until the conditions have been met.

  1. Prior to assignment:
    If visas are required for the country of assignment, the cooperant/advisor is responsible for obtaining the application forms from the respective embassy or consulate. In some cases, the executing agency may take the necessary steps for the advisor.
    The processing time required for a visa is usually from 3 to 4 working days in addition to mailing time, but for certain countries it can be up to 5 weeks. If mailing, these documents must always be sent by registered mail.
  2. During assignment:
    If travel outside the country of assignment is required in the performance of duties, the cooperant/advisor is expected to obtain any necessary visas.
  3. Charges for visas:
    If there is a charge for obtaining a visa, which is related to the assignment including family reunion travel, education travel and compassionate travel, the Administrative Officer may reimburse the cost of the visas, including the cost of photographs and mailing by registered mail. The cooperant/advisor is responsible for any related travel costs.
    The costs for visas related to personal travel shall not be reimbursed.

2.5 Declaration of Dependants

At the time of signing the contract and before leaving Canada, the Administrative Officer must have the cooperant/advisor sign a "Declaration of Dependants" (see Appendix 3), indicating:

  • the names, relationship and dates of birth of all dependants (accompanying or not), including those of the spouse/common-law partner;
  • the name, relationship and dates of birth of any other person who may be eligible for benefits under the provisions of this Handbook (e.g. a non-dependent child or a child from a previous relationship who may take family reunion travel).

Furthermore, the cooperant/advisor must submit the following documents to the Administrative Officer:

  • declaration of a spouse: Copy of the marriage certificate.
  • declaration of a common-law partner: Appendix 1: Declaration including two pieces of acceptable proof that the common-law partner resided with the cooperant/advisor for at least one year prior to the date of contract start date. Examples of proof of cohabitation would be a bank statement or utility bill addressed to the common-law partner at the same address as the cooperant/advisor during the past year. Where the period of one year is interrupted, as described in Appendix 1 and the Administrative Officer accepts the status of common-law partner, the Administrative Officer will determine what acceptable proof is required and so inform the cooperant/advisor.
  • declaration of a child or student dependant: Copy of the birth certificate or legal adoption papers.
  • declaration of a non-dependant child of the cooperant/advisor or of their spouse/common-law partner, who does not normally reside with them but are financially responsible for visiting privileges with the child under the terms of a custody agreement: Certified copy of the custody or divorce agreement, showing that the cooperant/advisor or spouse/common-law partner is responsible for all travel costs associated with the visitation terms as set out in the legal document.

2.6 Passports

  1. Before assignment:
    The cooperant/advisor and their accompanying dependants must obtain valid passports before leaving for the country of assignment.
    A valid passport will also be obtained for any dependant who, though not intending to reside in the city of assignment, is likely to travel during the assignment.
  2. During assignment:
    A valid passport will always be maintained. If a passport expires while the holder is overseas, application for a new passport will be made through the Canadian Embassy or High Commission responsible for the city of assignment.
    On the birth of a child overseas, application for registration of the child and a new passport will be made through the Canadian Embassy or High Commission responsible for the city of assignment.
  3. Other cases:
    If the cooperant's/advisor's spouse/common-law partner or dependant is not a Canadian citizen, a valid passport will need to be obtained by the cooperant/advisor from the particular country of citizenship.
  4. Charges for passports:
    All costs associated with obtaining passports are the responsibility of the cooperant/advisor and are not reimbursable.

2.7 Banking and Currency

2.7.1 Personal banking arrangements

Before leaving Canada, the cooperant must complete and submit the "Vendor Electronic Payment Registration Request" located at CIDA's web site (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). This will allow CIDA to directly deposit fees and other payments into a designated Canadian bank account. The advisor should consult with the executing agency for instructions.

The cooperant/advisor is responsible for making arrangements to transfer funds to the city of assignment. Any transfer charges or commissions for conversion to other currencies are not reimbursable. Established financial institutions are to be used to avoid difficulties in transferring funds.

2.7.2 Currency regulations

All currency regulations of the country of assignment must be observed. The Administrative Officer reserves the right to ask the cooperant/advisor to provide official exchange receipts confirming exchange rates obtained. Violations of such regulations will be considered misconduct subject to applicable cooperant/advisor contract penalties.
Because many countries place restrictions on currency export, it is strongly recommended, at the commencement of the assignment, that the cooperant/advisor obtain all information concerning currency regulations.

2.7.3 Rate of exchange and expense claims

Any claims presented to CIDA or to the executing agency in foreign currency will be converted to Canadian dollars at the official rate of exchange applicable on the actual date the transaction is paid (i.e. hotel invoice) or the rate indicated on currency exchange receipts for the transaction, if that rate exceeds the official Bank of Canada rate (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). For other expenses incurred (i.e. meals, taxis etc.) during an extended period, the monthly Bank of Canada rate will apply. If no receipts are available, the Bank of Canada rate will apply. All claims must be submitted in the currency in which the expenses were incurred.
For the cooperant: all advances issued must be justified to the CIDA office where the advance was issued.

2.7.4 Currency conversion at the end of the assignment

The cooperant/advisor is responsible for the conversion of any local funds remaining at the end of the assignment and any related bank charges related to such conversion.
For the cooperant only: Provided such transactions are legal in the country of assignment, the Canadian Embassy or High Commission may authorize the transfer of up to ten thousand Canadian dollars (C$10,000) resulting exclusively from the sale of a private motor vehicle. This service is at the discretion of the Embassy or the High Commission.

2.8 Intercultural Effectiveness Training

2.8.1 Centre for Intercultural Learning

The Centre for Intercultural Learning (CIL) has over 30 years of experience in developing and delivering intercultural effectiveness training to CIDA and its partners. The Centre's competency-based courses are anchored by the Profile of the Interculturally Effective Person (IEP). The IEP is a comprehensive and behaviour-based profile of the skills, knowledge, attitudes and other characteristics that are required or desirable for living and working effectively in another culture.
CIDA recognizes that intercultural barriers are among the significant challenges to achieving sustainable development. The intercultural services available are:

  1. Intercultural effectiveness programs for Canadians assigned abroad: pre-departure courses and debriefings for technical assistance personnel and youth;
  2. Intercultural effectiveness programs for professionals, students and trainees coming to Canada: On-arrival orientations, mid-term reviews and pre-returns;
  3. Personnel Assessment Services;
  4. Learning materials such as country specific documentation, cultural information, publications and videos; and
  5. Intercultural advice and consultation in support of effective development.

CIDA has mandated the CIL to work in partnership with CIDA, its executing agencies and development partners to determine their intercultural needs and identify the appropriate solutions.

CIDA stipulates in its contractual agreements with executing agencies and partners that certain services, such as pre-departure programs are required.

For additional information, contact the CIL directly (see Chapter 1.10 for contact information).

2.8.2 Training for Canadians assigned abroad (pre-departure and debriefing programs)

For participants in the Centre's pre-departure and debriefing programs, all training, transportation and accommodation expenses (in accordance with Treasury Board Travel Directive), are paid by CIDA through its agreement with the CIL.
When presenting its plan of activities in a project proposal, the executing agency must budget time and money for advisors to attend pre-departure training. CIDA will only reimburse executing agencies for the advisor's fee if it is specifically indicated in the contract or agreement between CIDA and the executing agency. Cooperant/advisor contracts or agreements must include the dates of pre-departure or debriefing programs if the cooperant/advisor is to be paid fees during this period.

Pre-departure training - Required
As part of the contractual agreements between CIDA, cooperants and executing agencies, all cooperants/advisors, their accompanying dependants and the executing agencies' sub contractors are required to attend a pre-departure training program.
Pre-departure training programs are designed to explore mission goals and priorities and provide comprehensive and detailed information on the personal and professional preparation necessary for success overseas. They provide training in intercultural effectiveness and an exploration of the receiving country's context.
To register the cooperant/advisor, the Administrative Officer must contact the CIL directly (see Chapter 1.10 for details).

End of assignment debriefing
The Project Manager may require the cooperant/advisor to participate in a debriefing session designed to facilitate personal and professional reintegration and to capture lessons learned. If the case arises, the Administrative Officer will contact the CIL.
The debriefing session is an opportunity for returning professionals to reflect on intercultural effectiveness, development and training. It is designed to explore a participant's experience abroad. Lessons derived from this exploration provide insight into, and enhance on-going and future overseas initiatives
To register the cooperant/advisor or the sub contractor, the Administrative Officer must contact the CIL directly (see Chapter 1.10 for details).

2.8.3 Personnel assessment services

The Centre's unique Intercultural Living and Working Inventory (ILWI) helps take the guesswork out of international recruitment. The ILWI is a research-based assessment inventory that provides your organization with a profile of your candidate's potential for adjustment and professional effectiveness on an international assignment.
For more information on the ILWI, please contact the CIL directly (see Chapter 1.10 for details).

2.8.4 In-country intercultural training

In-country intercultural effectiveness programs are available on an ad hoc basis. They are highly specific, and developed on-demand to provide in-country intercultural support to project teams and programs. The nature and scope of these services is such that availability of resources must be discussed and agreed upon between CIDA, the executing agency and the CIL before proceeding.
These programs are typically characterized by a high degree of integration with the overseas stage(s) of a project management cycle such as project inception, mid-project review or a work plan revision. The more common features of the in-country performance support programs have been: stakeholder exchange partnership review, intercultural capacity building and intercultural training in project-specific methodologies such as Result Based Management and Participatory Rural Appraisal.

2.9 Advances

2.9.1 Fee advance

Cooperant: Once the contract is signed, the Administrative Officer may provide the cooperant with a fee advance of up to six thousand Canadian dollars (C$6,000).
This advance will be recovered from subsequent contract fees in three (3) equal amounts, deducted on the last day of the second, third and fourth month of the cooperant's assignment.
Advisor: If the executing agency provides the advisor with an advance, it shall not exceed six thousand Canadian dollars (C$6,000) and the reimbursement plan may vary.

2.9.2 Accountable advance

Once the contract is signed and after submitting a written request to the Administrative Officer, the cooperant/advisor may receive an accountable advance to cover the following expenses.

  • fifty percent (50%) of CIDA's mandatory minimum accident and sickness insurance coverage and one hundred percent (100%) of surcharges (see section 2.2);
  • actual, reasonable and admissible relocation costs not covered by the Relocation Travel Allowance (see Chapter 4.2);

The cooperant/advisor must account for any such advance within 15 days after the expenses are incurred. No further advance will be made until the outstanding advance has been justified.

2.10 Income Tax

2.10.1 Tax liability

Fees
The cooperant's/advisor's fee is subject to Canadian income tax as the CIDA project is government funded.
Before departure from Canada, the cooperant/advisor should contact Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) to determine their residency status and obtain all necessary information.

Benefits
CRA issued an opinion that reimbursement of most actual expenses are considered taxable while the issuance of non-accountable allowances is not.
Please see the introductory remarks in Chapter 12 for further explanation of the required changes to administrative procedures and for the mandatory forms and reporting that must be completed when a non-accountable allowance is issued.

2.10.2 Tax return

The cooperant/advisor is required to complete and submit an annual return to CRA.
CIDA does not make deductions at source and issues cooperants with a T1204 form (Government Service Contract Payments form). CIDA cooperants will be contacted annually in December or January, by e-mail, for instructions on where the cooperant prefers to have their T1204 mailed.
For advisors, the executing agency will supply T4 or T4A forms for each calendar year.
Neither the cooperant nor the advisor is engaged as a CIDA employee. CIDA is not responsible for any payments and/or deductions required to be made on behalf of the cooperant to any governmental plans including the Canada or Quebec Pension Plans, and CIDA will not pay or reimburse any portion of such expenses. The advisor must address all questions regarding this subject to the executing agency as provisions may differ depending on the advisor's status with the executing agency (example: if the advisor is an employee or a contractor.)

2.11 CIDA Contribution to a Pension Plan

2.11.1 For the cooperant

CIDA is not responsible for any payments and/or deductions required to be made on behalf of the cooperant to any governmental plans including the Canada or Quebec Pension Plans, and CIDA will not pay or reimburse any portion of such expenses.
Where no employer contribution has been made to a registered pension or retirement plan, the cooperant may be reimbursed a taxable amount equal to fifty percent (50%) of the individual's contribution to one or more registered pension funds under the following conditions:

  • The amount to be reimbursed does not exceed seven percent (7%) of the basic fee paid under the contract for any given calendar year.
  • Official receipts acceptable for income tax purposes or an official letter from a bank/financial institution confirming the purchase of the contribution are required.
  • The amount reimbursed is taxable.
  • Any claim for reimbursement must be submitted to the Administrative Officer at the latest within 60 days of the end of the contract or agreement.
  • The plan must be in the cooperant's name. Spousal RRSP's are not eligible for reimbursement.
  • The cooperant will bill CIDA only once a year, at the end of the calendar year, for contributions related to that calendar year and/or any eligible amounts not contributed in previous years.

2.11.2 For the advisor

When the executing agency provides contributions to a pension plan on behalf of the advisor, these are peremptorily deemed to be covered under the mark-up for "fringe benefits" or in the all-inclusive fixed daily/monthly rate in the agreement or contract between the executing agency and CIDA.

2.12 Motor Vehicle Insurance

The cost of such insurance is the responsibility of the cooperant/advisor.

2.13 Household Effects Insurance

The risk of loss or damage to household effects is high, especially during international shipments. It is wise to avoid bringing very valuable objects and to ensure to full replacement value all household effects whether they are in transit, in Canada or in the country of assignment. The cooperant/advisor bears the cost of insurance and should investigate the appropriateness and availability of "all-risk" insurance.

The importance of having a detailed and complete inventory of household effects cannot be overemphasized


Chapter 3 - Relocation - Shipping and Storage

Subject to the limitations set out in this chapter, at the beginning and end of the assignment, the Administrative Officer will pay relocation expenses billed by commercial moving companies in Canada and abroad for packing, transport, shipping, en route storage, in-Canada long term storage, delivery and unpacking of the cooperant's/advisor's/accompanying dependant's household effects. The cooperant/advisor is responsible for any related custom duties and insurance charges.
If the departure address from Canada or return address to Canada differs from the contract address, the Administrative Officer will only reimburse the actual and reasonable relocation expenses up to the cost which would have been incurred for the relocation of household effects to or from the contract address. If the cooperant/advisor does not relocate at the beginning or end of the contract as the cooperant/advisor is either residing in the city of assignment or has decided to remain in the city of assignment, the provisions of this chapter shall not apply unless, as described in article 3.2.6, the relocation takes place within six (6) months after the end of the contract.
The cooperant/advisor shall not enter into any financially binding obligation with any moving company prior to contract signature.

3.1 Customs Regulations

There are usually special rules regarding duty-free importation of household effects to the country of assignment. The Project Manager will provide all necessary information regarding this matter. The cooperant/advisor is responsible for customs clearance in the country of assignment, but may seek advice from the Project Manager.
Cooperants or advisors who need to bring technical equipment to the country of assignment should enquire about the requirements for customs clearance and importation and ensure that any necessary paperwork is completed well in advance. Documents in the language of the country may be required.
On return to Canada, the cooperant/advisor is responsible for clearance through Canadian customs of all household effects and for any related duties and charges.

3.2 Shipment of Household Effects

For shipping of household effects as well as long-term storage in Canada, the cooperant/advisor or the executing agency must compare different commercial moving companies and select the one with the best value.
The Administrative Officer reserves the right to review quotes received from the companies.

Procedures for approval and payment

  • Once the contract has been signed, the cooperant/advisor must submit to the Administrative Officer two (2) detailed estimates of the cost of shipping the cooperant's/advisor's household effects to the city of assignment. The estimates must include the net weight in kilograms.
  • The estimates are subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer. The Administrative Officer will inform the moving company chosen if amendments are required to the estimate. The Administrative Officer will provide the moving company with the necessary shipping instructions required to proceed with the relocation, within the weight limitations outlined in Section 3.3.
  • The cooperant/advisor is personally responsible for any additional charges associated with the shipment(s) exceeding these weight limitations.
  • The invoice must be sent directly to the Administrative Officer. The net weight in kilograms must be clearly indicated on the invoice.
  • No moving company administrative fees nor insurance shall be paid for or reimbursed by the Administrative Officer.
  • The Administrative Officer shall not pay the invoice until the household effects are received by the cooperant/advisor.

3.2.1 Excess baggage

No costs for shipment of excess baggage as accompanied luggage at the beginning or end of an assignment will be paid for or reimbursed by the Administrative Officer.<br />

3.2.2 Subsequent shipments

The cost of subsequent shipments shall not exceed the cost of transporting those household effects from the contract address to the city of assignment or from the city of assignment to the contract address.

  1. Within the first 6 months
    Subject to the overall weight limitations (see Section 3.3 - Weight limitations), a subsequent shipment of essential household effects may be authorized by the Administrative Officer. This shipment must take place during the first 6 months after moving into permanent accommodation.
  2. During the assignment
    The lesser cost of either a shipment of air cargo or accompanied excess baggage, in accordance with Vacation Travel Assistance (see Chapter 5.4.3), may be authorized by the Administrative Officer if the cooperant/advisor is working in a city of assignment with a Post Rating of III or more.
  3. Change in number of dependants
    In accordance with the weight limitations established in Section 3.3, a subsequent shipment of household effects may be authorized as follows:
  • at the birth or adoption of a child. (maximum 100 kg net);
  • when a student dependant leaves the city of assignment to study in Canada in conjunction with approved education travel (see Chapter 5.6). (maximum 100 kg net);
  • when an accompanying dependant permanently leaves the city of assignment. (maximum 300 kg net);
  • when a non-accompanying dependant joins the cooperant/advisor in the city of assignment as an accompanying dependant during the course of the assignment. The total quantity of household effects to be shipped, including all other shipments for the cooperant/advisor, will not exceed the cooperant's/advisor's weight entitlement as set out in Section 3.3 for the new household size;
  • when a spouse/common-law partner qualifies as a dependant (see Appendix 1) during the contract period, and joins the cooperant/advisor as an accompanying dependant in the city of assignment, the following conditions shall apply:
  1. packing, crating and transportation shall be paid following the same approval process as described in Section 3.2
  2. subject to the prior approval of the Administrative Officer, the shipment will be to the city of assignment:
    • from the location where the marriage took place; or
    • from the spouse's previous place of residence at the time of marriage; or
    • from the cooperant's/advisor's contract address in the case of a common-law partner qualifying as a dependant according to Appendix 1
    • not exceeding the cost of a shipment from the contract address to the city of assignment.
  3. the total quantity of household effects shipped, including all other shipments for the cooperant/advisor, will not exceed the cooperant's/advisor's weight entitlement as set out in Section 3.3 for the new household size.
  4. transportation of the spouse's/common-law partner's household effects will not be authorized by the Administrative Officer if the move is within any area, which according to local custom, is within commuting distance of the cooperant's/advisor's city of assignment.
  5. the move must be effected immediately after the marriage or after the date of dependency and no less than six months before the termination of contract.

3.2.3 Technical material

The Administrative Officer may increase the shipping entitlement by an amount sufficient to cover the cost of transporting technical material or equipment for the project, if these are deemed necessary by the Project Manager. Any technical material being transported to the city of assignment must appear as a separate item on the moving company's estimated cost and final invoice.

3.2.4 Cross-posting

When, at the request of the Project Manager, a cooperant or an advisor is transferred from one city of assignment to another, on a CIDA funded project, authority will be given for the transportation of household effects from:

  • the previous city of assignment to the new city of assignment,
  • the previous city of assignment to the contract address,
  • the contract address to the new city of assignment.

The cumulative weight of all these shipments shall not exceed the weight entitlement established in Section 3.3.

3.2.5 Contract extension

There are no shipping entitlements of household effects when the contract is extended in the same city of assignment.

3.2.6 Shipping of household effects at end of assignment

As at the commencement of the assignment, the cooperant/advisor must follow the procedures indicated in Section 3.2. Subject to the prior approval of the Administrative Officer, the cooperant/advisor may proceed with arrangements with the movers. The cooperant/advisor enters into the contract with the moving company and provides all shipping instructions, including the address to appear on all packages. Normally, shipments are addressed c/o the storage company in Canada.
If the return address to Canada differs from the contract address, the Administrative Officer will only reimburse the actual and reasonable relocation expenses up to the cost which would have been incurred for transportation of household effects to the contract address at the contract termination. If the cooperant/advisor does not relocate at the end of the contract as the cooperant/advisor decides to remain in the city of assignment, the provisions of this chapter shall not apply unless the relocation takes place within six (6) months after the end of the contract.
Expenses related to relocation of household effects will not be reimbursed if incurred six (6) months after the end of the contract. If during that period the contract between the executing agency and CIDA terminates, claims for expenses must be submitted by the advisor prior to the termination date of the CIDA/executing agency contract.
The cooperant/advisor must complete and forward forms requested by the country of assignment for the export of household effects, with the assistance of the moving company.
The company in Canada storing the household effects is usually the commercial packing company used at the time of relocation. This company will retain the incoming household effects in customs storage until the cooperant/advisor arrives and customs clearance has been obtained.
The cooperant/advisor is responsible for clearance through Canadian customs of all household effects, and for any related duties, charges and insurance costs.

3.3 Weight limitations

The maximum combined air and surface freight weight allowance for the cooperant/advisor is described in the chart below in kg. net. Net weight includes only household effects, wrapping and packing materials. Net weight does not include crating, whose weight varies from country to country.

Number in household
(Cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants)
Weight in kg net
11,350
22,050
32,350
42,650
52,950
63,250
73,550

The proportion of air and surface freight is determined by the Administrative Officer, taking into account costs related to temporary living expenses in the city of assignment.

Note: For some countries, all household effects must be sent by air. Refer to the list published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

3.4 Restricted Household Effects

  1. The following items may not be packed, stored or shipped at CIDA's expense:
    • automobiles, motorized vehicles, motors;
    • barbecues made from brick, cement or stone;
    • patio stones;
    • building materials (lumber, cement blocks, etc.);
    • portable buildings such as tool sheds;
    • boats, trailers, all terrain vehicles and snowmobiles;
    • aircraft, parts of aircraft;
    • perishable goods;
    • fuel, both liquid and solid, including tanks for gas barbecues;
    • explosives, corrosives, flammable liquids, aerosols, cooking oil;
    • pets or livestock;
    • home brew;
    • firearms, ammunition;
    • goods requiring climatically controlled conditions;
    • farm or construction equipment or machinery;
    • items which by international law cannot be moved (e.g. protected species, national treasures);
    • items which by local law cannot be moved or stored (e.g. narcotics, tobacco, alcohol, plants).
  2. The cooperant/advisor will consult with the moving company if there are any doubts if a household effect is restricted.

3.5 Long-term storage in Canada

It is recommended that the mover chosen to ship household effects to the city of assignment also provides long term storage.

The Administrative Officer will pay the costs for packing, unpacking, local transportation and storage of household effects at the nearest suitable long-term commercial storage facility closest to the contract address. Payment is subject to the limitations set out below.
Costs for packing, transporting, withdrawing or storing of household goods during the assignment will not be reimbursed. In the case of a dependant joining the cooperant/advisor in the city of assignment during the assignment, transportation of the dependant's household effects to the storage facilities will not be reimbursed.
Limitations

  1. Monthly maximum: actual and reasonable costs of long-term commercial storage up to two hundred and eighty Canadian dollars (C$280) per month upon receipt of an invoice from a commercial storage company. The invoice submitted to the Administrative Officer must indicate volume/weight stored and price per volume/weight.The monthly storage cost limitation will be revised by CIDA from time to time and will be published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address)
  2. Time limits: The storage period paid by the Administrative Officer may commence no sooner than one month prior to the effective date of the contract, and end no later than one month following its termination.
  3. Insurance:The cooperant/advisor is responsible for all insurance costs for household effects in storage, in transit, and in the city of assignment.
  4. Restricted household effects: Articles listed in Section 3.4 &quot;Restricted Household Effects&quot; may not be packed, stored or moved at CIDA's expense.

3.6 Household Effects Insurance

The cost of such insurance is the responsibility of the cooperant/advisor.
Without limiting any provisions of this Handbook, CIDA will not assume any liability for claims resulting from loss of, or damage to, household effects whether they are in transit, in Canada or in the city of assignment.

3.7 Inventories

The importance of having a detailed and complete inventory of household effects cannot be overemphasized. For insurance and other purposes, the cooperant/advisor may need four separate inventories covering air freight, surface freight, accompanying baggage and long-term storage in Canada. These inventories are for the use of packing and freight forwarding agents. The cooperant/advisor will consult the moving company and insurance broker for further information regarding this matter.


"Chapter 4 - Travel - Relocation

Subject to the limitations set out in this chapter, at the beginning and end of the assignment, the Administrative Officer will pay relocation travel expenses as described in this chapter.
If the departure address from Canada or return address to Canada differs from the contract address, the Administrative Officer will only reimburse the actual and reasonable relocation expenses up to the cost which would have been incurred for travel relocation to or from the contract address. If the cooperant/advisor does not relocate at the beginning or end of the contract as the cooperant/advisor is either already residing in the city of assignment or has decided to remain in the city of assignment, the provisions of this chapter shall not apply unless the relocation takes place within six (6) months after the end of the contract.

Travel Arrangements
The cooperant/advisor shall not enter into any financially binding obligation with the carrier prior to contract signature. When public funds are expended, Canadian government policy states that preference shall be given to using Canadian suppliers.

4.1 Arrival and Departure Procedures

The cooperant/advisor must, immediately upon arrival in the city of assignment and immediately prior to departure from the city of assignment, inform the Administrative Officer, Project Manager and the CIDA Field Representative in writing of the following arrivals and departures of the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants:

  • date of moving out of the permanent accommodation in Canada;
  • date of departure from Canada;
  • date of the permanent arrival in the city of assignment at the commencement of the assignment;
  • date of the move into permanent accommodation;
  • dates of temporary absences from the city of assignment for any reason (business travel or personal travel);
  • dates of return to the city of assignment after temporary absences;
  • date of moving out of the permanent accommodation at the termination of the assignment;
  • final date of departure from the city of assignment;
  • date of move into permanent accommodation in Canada.

Written notice must also be given of any change of address.
No overseas allowance will be paid before the Administrative Officer has received the cooperant's/advisor's permanent arrival date in the city of assignment and the date of final departure from the city of assignment.

4.2 Relocation Transportation Costs and Routes

At the beginning and at the end of the assignment, the cooperant/advisor will be responsible for making their own travel arrangements. These travel expenses shall form part of the non-accountable relocation travel allowance provided by the Administrative Officer. If the destination at the end of the assignment is not the contract address, a non-accountable relocation travel allowance shall not apply.

4.2.1 Relocation Travel Allowance (hereinafter called RTA)

The RTA includes the following:

  1. A transportation entitlement for the cooperant/advisor and each accompanying dependant.
  2. Two (2) days living expenses (see definition) at the contract address and in the new city of assignment for the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants relocating from Canada.
  3. Two (2) days living expenses in the previous city of assignment and at the contract address for cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants when relocating back to Canada.
  4. Two (2) days living expenses in the previous city of assignment and in the new city of assignment for the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants when cross-posting to a new city of assignment.
  5. Living expenses at authorized stopovers.

4.2.2 Procedures for the calculation and payment of the RTA

The cooperant/advisor completes and submits, in accordance with the provisions of this section, the RTA form ( Appendix 4) to the Administrative Officer. The amount of the RTA will be subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer who will then arrange for payment of the RTA to the cooperant/advisor. The applicable Bank of Canada exchange rate (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) is the rate effective the date of the air fare quote.

  1. Transportation allowance:The cooperant/advisor obtains and attaches to the form, a detailed original airfare quote from a commercial travel agency, representing the cost of full (Y) economy airfare (ONE WAY ONLY), for the cooperant/advisor and each accompanying dependant. Where a child's rate is available, that rate shall be included in the quote and shall be used to determine the airfare entitlement. The quote must be based on the most direct routing from:
    • the major airport closest to the contract address to the major airport closest to the city of assignment OR,
    • at termination of the contract, from the major airport closest to the city of assignment to the major airport closest to the contract address OR,
    • for a cross posting, from the major airport closest to the previous city of assignment to the major airport closest to the new city of assignment.
    In the case of a spouse/common-law partner qualifying as an accompanying dependant during the period of the contract, the airfare quote (ONE WAY ONLY) must be from the contract address or the location of the residence of the spouse/common-law partner to the city of assignment. The quote shall not exceed the airfare cost (ONE WAY ONLY) from the contract address to the city of assignment.
  2. Temporary accommodation allowance:commercial hotel accommodation for an average priced hotel unless the cooperant/advisor is able to reside in their own home (e.g. if a spouse/common-law partner remains in Canada and will continue to reside in the family home or if the cooperant/advisor is able to immediately move into permanent residence in the city of assignment):
    • at the beginning of relocation travel, two (2) nights at the contract address or at the originating city of assignment, and
    • at the end of relocation travel, two (2) nights in the new city of assignment or contract address, and
    • One (1) night stop-over if approved in Section 4.2.2(d) below.
    As a source of average hotel rates, the Canadian Government Department of Public Works and Government Services Canada publishes hotel rates on their web site (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). Alternatively, the Administrative Officer may use the experience of other travellers for an average hotel in the city of assignment or enroute. Consideration is to be given to family size while performing this calculation. For example, if a family of four is travelling (cooperant/advisor, spouse/common-law partner and two young children) two rooms may be required if a suitable rate for a two bedroom suite is not available. If private accommodation (other than their own residence) is used during any of these days, an accommodation allowance in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive for private accommodation will apply (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).
  3. Meals and incidental expense allowance:
    • at the beginning of relocation travel, two (2) days meal and incidental expense allowance is calculated for the cooperant/advisor at the contract address or in the city of assignment and two (2) days meal allowance only (i.e. no incidental allowance) for all accompanying dependants, and
    • for approved enroute stopovers (see Section 4.2.2(d)), one (1) day meal and incidental allowance for the cooperant/advisor and one (1) day meal allowance only for all accompanying dependants, and
    • at the end of relocation travel, two (2) days meal and incidental expense allowance for the cooperant/advisor at the contract address or in the new city of assignment and two (2) days meal allowance only for all accompanying dependants in the new city of assignment.
    • The meal allowance authorized for a child is based on the allowance for an adult, as follows:

    In Canada and the United States

    • up to 12 years - 1/2 daily amount
    • 12 years of age and over - full daily amount

    Outside Canada and the United States

    • up to 4 years - 1/2 daily amount
    • 4 years of age and over - full daily amount.

    The Treasury Board Travel Directive rates are to be used for the meal and incidental rates (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

  4. Approved stopovers and travel days:The number of travel days and overnight stopovers authorized is determined as follows:
    • Africa: two (2) days, one (1) night stopover.
    • Asia: two (2) days, one (1) night stopover.
    • Caribbean: one (1) day, no night stopover. If meals are required, the Treasury Board Travel Directive Canadian meal allowance shall apply for the cooperant/advisor and each accompanying dependant . No incidental allowance is payable. A one (1) night stopover may be approved by the Administrative Officer when, through no fault of the cooperant/advisor, connecting flights are not available to complete the trip in one day.
    • Central and Eastern Europe: two (2) days, one (1) night stopover.
    • Central America: two (2) days, one (1) night stopover.
    • Pacific Islands: two (2) days, one (1) night stopover. If the fare quote indicates that connecting flights are such that two (2) nights stopover are necessary, the allowance will be adjusted accordingly.
    • South America: two (2) days, one (1) night stopover.

4.2.3 Accountable relocation expenses

In addition to the RTA, the cooperant/advisor may submit to the Administrative Officer a travel claim accompanied by receipts for reimbursement of the following expenses:

  1. Taxis - The use of taxis may be authorized by the Administrative Officer when airport bus/limousine or public transit service is not available or practical. Claims for taxi charges must indicate the starting point and destination, the purpose and cost of each trip. Taxis to and from airports may be reimbursed at the contract address, authorized stopover locations and in the city of assignment.
  2. If the distance between the airport and the contract address is over 100 kilometers, actual and reasonable transportation expenses will also be reimbursed upon presentation of receipts. If travel is by private motor vehicle, Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) kilometer rates apply.
  3. Airport taxes, if not included in the cost of airline tickets.
  4. Temporary living expenses not included in the RTA (see Section 4.3).
    Any advance made to the cooperant/advisor in accordance with article 2.9.2 shall be justified within 15 days after the expenses are incurred. No further advance will be made until the outstanding advance has been justified.

4.2.4 Relocation during long school recess

When a cooperant/advisor is entitled to an education allowance for a non-accompanying student dependant and the relocation occurs during the long school recess, the student dependant may travel with the cooperant/advisor to the city of assignment for the duration of the long school recess. Relocation expenses for the student dependant will be included in the RTA. For return travel to the school at the end of the long school recess, the Education Travel provisions shall apply (see Chapter 5.6).

4.2.5 Relocation at end of assignment

To receive the RTA at the end of the contract, the cooperant/advisor will submit the RTA form (Appendix 4) to the Administrative Officer, as per Section 4.2.2. Relocation must take place within 6 months after termination of the contract. If within that period the contract between CIDA and the executing agency terminates, requests for the RTA must be submitted prior to the termination of the contract. If the destination at the end of the assignment is not the contract address, a non-accountable relocation travel allowance shall not apply.

Where the return address to Canada differs from the contract address, the Administrative Officer will only reimburse the actual and reasonable relocation expenses up to the cost which would have been incurred for travel relocation to the contract address at the time of contract termination. The cooperant/advisor shall submit a travel claim, with receipts, to the Administrative Officer for reimbursement of the expenses indicated in 4.2.2 and 4.2.3.

Where the cooperant/advisor does not relocate at the end of the contract as the cooperant/advisor decides to remain in the city of assignment, the provisions of this chapter shall not apply unless the relocation takes place within six (6) months after the end of the contract.

4.3 Temporary Living Expenses during Relocation

At the beginning and end of the assignment, a cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants may face a situation where their permanent accommodation is not yet ready and available. The Administrative Officer will reimburse temporary living expenses in accordance with the terms outlined in this section.
The meal allowance authorized for a child is based on the allowance for an adult, as follows:

  1. In Canada and the United States
    • up to 12 years - 1/2 daily amount
    • 12 years of age and over - full daily amount
  2. Outside Canada and the United States
    • up to 4 years - 1/2 daily amount
    • 4 years of age and over - full daily amount.

4.3.1 Prior to departure from Canada

Prior to departure from Canada, the cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants will receive a temporary accommodation and meal allowance as part of the RTA for a period of 2 (two) days. If the cooperant/advisor is able to reside in their own home no amount shall be payable. If this information is not known at the time of issuing the RTA, the amount will be recovered from the cooperant/advisor by the Administrative Officer.

4.3.2 Upon arrival in country of assignment

Residence ready
If upon arrival in the city of assignment, the permanent residence is ready and available and the shipment of household effects has been delivered, temporary living expenses shall not be claimed. If the RTA included two (2) days temporary accommodation on arrival in the city of assignment, this amount will be recovered from the cooperant/advisor by the Administrative Officer. The two (2) day meal allowance will remain unaffected.
However, if the shipment of household effects has not arrived in the city of assignment and essential articles required to occupy and maintain the accommodation are not available, temporary living expenses may be claimed by the cooperant/advisor as described below.

Residence not ready

  • Day 1 and 2: living expenses are included in the RTA
  • From 3rd to 21st day:

Accommodation: actual and reasonable expenses with receipts in commercial accommodation or the private accommodation rate in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address);
Meals: eighty percent (80%) of the local meal rate, for the cooperant/advisor and each accompanying dependant;
Incidentals: an incidental allowance, in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive, for the cooperant/advisor only (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address);
NOTE: For commercial accommodation beyond 21 days, the cooperant/advisor must submit a written report to the Administrative Officer specifying the reason for extension beyond the 21st day and listing their house hunting efforts.

  • From the 22nd day to the 35th day, only self-contained commercial accommodation will be reimbursed or the private accommodation rate in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

As soon as it becomes evident that the cooperant/advisor cannot move into a permanent residence within 35 days, the cooperant or the executing agency, on behalf of the advisor, must submit a written report to CIDA's Technical Assistance Unit detailing the reasons for temporary living expenses beyond 35 days and listing all efforts made to locate permanent accommodation.

4.3.3 Prior to departure from the city of assignment

At the end of the assignment, only two (2) days of temporary accommodation in the city of assignment are authorized and will be included in the RTA.

Reimbursable expenses and the RTA calculations are the same as at the departure from Canada (see Section 4.2.2).

4.3.4 Upon return to Canada

Upon returning to Canada, only two (2) days of temporary accommodation are authorized and will be included in the RTA. Temporary living expenses incurred or claimed 6 months or more after the end of the contract will not be reimbursed.
When public funds are expended, Canadian government policy states that preference shall be given to using Canadian suppliers.

Chapter 5 - Travel

5.1 Travel Before and After the Contract

The cooperant/advisor will be reimbursed for actual and reasonable travel expenses in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) when required for:

  1. pre-contract meetings, including briefing and debriefing sessions and conferences, only if included in the contract;
  2. medical examinations for potential cooperants/advisors and their accompanying dependants (see Chapter 2.1 for conditions).

5.2 Travel in Country of Assignment

5.2.1 Private vehicles

It is the responsibility of each cooperant/advisor to make appropriate arrangements for use of private vehicles, including insurance, in the city of assignment (see Chapter 2.12).

5.2.2 Project vehicles

Project vehicles are meant for project use only. For example, driving to and from work constitutes personal and not project use. The personal use of a project vehicle is a benefit to which the cooperant/advisor is not entitled.

5.3 Overseas Duty Travel

5.3.1 When requested by the country of assignment

When the country of assignment requires the cooperant/advisor to travel, the country of assignment will normally pay for the travel expenses (or give an allowance in lieu of actual and reasonable travel expenses), as provided for in the country's regulations. Any cooperant/advisor who encounters difficulties in obtaining reimbursement of travel expenses should submit a written explanation of the difficulties to the Project Manager who may authorize reimbursement in accordance with Section 5.3.2 below.

5.3.2 When requested by the Project Manager

A cooperant/advisor travelling outside the city of assignment, at the request of CIDA or of the executing agency, is entitled to reimbursement of travel expenses incurred in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).
For reimbursement, the cooperant/advisor must submit a travel claim, supported by receipts, to the Project Manager.

5.4 Vacation Travel (hereinafter called VT)

5.4.1 Purpose of vacation travel

It is in the interest of the cooperant/advisor and their accompanying dependants working and living overseas to take a vacation in Canada or some location other than the city of assignment.

5.4.2 Vacation Travel Allowance (hereinafter called VTA)

The cooperant/advisor and each accompanying dependant is entitled to a non-accountable VTA representing seventy-five percent (75%) of a return full (Y) economy class airfare (excluding taxes), by the most direct routing from the city of assignment to the contract address and return to the city of assignment, subject to the following conditions (see Section 5.4.2 b)).

a)Eligibility and Frequency

Duration of continuous assignment2 years or moreFrequency of VT
Any duration0None
Less than 2 yearsI - VNone
2 years or moreI - VCorresponds to the number of full years of continuous assignment minus one, with one return trip for a two-year assignment, two return trips for a three-year assignment, etc.

b.Conditions and reporting requirements

  1. The conditions and reporting requirements for travel allowances described in Chapter 12 must be adhered to;
  2. VT applies to the cooperant/advisor, accompanying dependants and student dependants authorized by CIDA's Technical Assistance Unit to attend an educational facility in a third country (see Chapter 8.2.5);
  3. A minimum of 10 days leave must be taken in conjunction with VT;
  4. Leave must be approved in advance by the Project Manager and approval of leave is subject to operational requirements;
  5. An individual's VT must be used for one trip only;
  6. VT entitlements cannot be transferred to another person;
  7. VT must be used for the purpose intended;
  8. The trip must start and end in the city of assignment;
  9. A student dependant being educated in the country of assignment but not in the city of assignment because education facilities in the city of assignment are not compatible, is entitled to VT. As VT must start and end in the city of assignment, the cooperant/advisor must request the application of the Family Reunion Travel provisions for the student's travel to and from the location of the school and the city of assignment;
  10. Where, under exceptional circumstances (see Chapter 8.2.5), a student dependant has been authorized to attend school in a third location, VT applies as indicated in ix) above;
  11. VT may be taken to a destination other than the contract address in Canada;
  12. VT must take place during the period of assignment;
  13. subject to the prior approval of the Administration Officer, VT may be authorized for dependants when, for reasons acceptable to the Administration Officer, the cooperant/advisor does not travel with the dependants.

c.Procedures and method of calculation of the VTV

  1. At least two months prior to travel, the cooperant/advisor completes and forwards, to the Administration Officer, the "Request for Vacation Travel Allowance" form (Appendix 5). The request shall include their expected travel dates, destination and costs associated with the vacation. A detailed original airfare quote (taxes excluded) from a commercial travel agency must be attached. The travel agency quote, EXCLUDING taxes, must indicate the full economy (Y) return air fare rate by the most direct routing from the city of assignment to the contract address and, if a child is travelling, a child full economy (Y) air fare rate;
  2. The VTA is seventy-five percent (75%) of the pre-tax airfare quotes. If the nearest major airport is more than 100 km from the city of assignment or the contract address, the VTA can also include an amount to cover the return distance from the major airport. This amount shall be in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive Canadian kilometre rate or, for international kilometre rates, at the kilometre rate at locations abroad (tax paid) published in the Treasury Board Travel Directive by Foreign Affairs Canada (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address);
  3. The applicable Bank of Canada exchange rate (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) is the rate effective the date of the air fare quote.
  4. The approved annual leave request must be attached to the VTA form (Appendix 5) in order for the VTA to be approved and issued;.
  5. The amount of the VTA will be subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer who will then arrange for payment of the VTA to the cooperant/advisor. Payment will not be made more than sixty (60) days prior to travel;
  6. Within thirty (30) days of completion of travel, the cooperant/advisor must complete and submit to the Administrative Officer, the Allowance Certification form (Appendix 11) as described in Chapter 12. The cooperant/advisor must retain evidence for a period of seven (7) years and is required, when requested by the Administrative Officer, to demonstrate that the VTA was used for the purpose intended;
  7. When completing Appendix 11, the cooperant/advisor must indicate the total amounts which were spent for transportation and travel related expenditures. At least fifty percent (50%) of the VTA issued must be used for transportation expenses (excluding taxes) and at least ninety percent (90%) of the VTA issued must be used for travel and travel-related expenses such as transportation, accommodation, meals and incidental travel expenses such as tours, entry fees etc. and that the VTA was used for the purpose intended;
  8. The Administrative Officer reviews the Allowance Certification form in accordance with vi) above and recuperates from the cooperant/advisor unsubstantiated amounts;
  9. No further allowance will be authorized until the required Allowance Certification form has been submitted to the Administrative Officer.

5.4.3 Other vacation travel benefits - accountable

Subsequent shipment of household effects:
As an extension of the provisions of Chapter 3.2.2 b) Relocation - Shipping, if the city of assignment has a Post Rating level of III - V, each person travelling under VT is entitled to claim a subsequent shipment of 20 kilograms of baggage in addition to the normal airline baggage allowance. The cost shall be limited to the lesser cost of either air cargo or accompanied excess baggage. The cooperant/advisor must provide evidence that the method of shipment chosen is the most economical.

5.5 Family Reunion Travel (hereinafter called FRT)

5.5.1 Purpose of family reunion travel

The purpose of family reunion travel is to minimize hardship resulting from family separation by facilitating family reunions in the city of assignment.

5.5.2 Family Reunion Travel Allowance (hereinafter called FRTA)

The cooperant/advisor is entitled to a FRTA reflecting the lowest available airfare, including APEX, charters and other reduced or discounted fares, for the most direct routing between the residence of the dependant or the contract address and the city of assignment for the following family members:

a.Eligibility and frequency

NOTE: A "12-month period" is the actual academic year, which is normally September 1 to August 31 in the northern hemisphere and January 1 to December 31 in the southern hemisphere. For travel by an unaccompanied cooperant/advisor, a "12-month period" is from the date of arrival in the city of assignment or the first day of the contract, whichever is the latter.

FRT Table A: Student Dependant not yet 21 on September 1
Educational InstitutionEducation LevelEducational Facilities in the city of assignmentFrequencyFamily Reunion Travel Allowance
In Canada or in the country of assignment IF the cooperant/advisor is in receipt of an education allowance.ElementaryIncompatible2 return trips in 12-month periodEducational Institution / city of assignment
In a third countryElementaryIncompatibleNone 
In Canada, in the city of assignment or in a third country.ElementaryCompatibleNone 
In Canada IF the cooperant/advisor is in receipt of an education allowance.SecondaryCompatible or incompatible2 return trips in 12-month periodEducational Institution / city of assignment
In a third countrySecondaryCompatibleNone 
In a third country IF the cooperant/advisor is in receipt of an education allowance.SecondaryIncompatible2 return trips in 12-month periodEducational Institution / city of assignment
FRT Table B: Other Situations
TravellerFrequencyFamily Reunion Travel Allowance
Dependant child of cooperant/advisor or spouse/ common-law partner who is not residing in the city of assignment, is not attending school, and is under 21 years of age on September 1.1 return trip in 12-month periodLocation of traveller / city of assignment UP TO cost of city of assignment / contract address
Unaccompanied cooperant/advisor travels to location of dependants.1 return trip in 12-month periodCity of assignment / location of dependants UP TO the cost of city of assignment / contract address
Dependants of unaccompanied cooperant/advisor travel to the city of assignment.1 return trip in 12-month periodLocation of traveller / city of assignment UP TO the cost of contract address / city of assignment
Dependant child of a previous relationship for whom the cooperant/advisor or spouse/ common-law partner has financial responsibility for visitation under a legal agreement.1 return trip in 12-month periodCity of assignment / location of other parent MINUS the cost of city of assignment / contract address
Non-dependant child of a previous relationship not yet 21 years of age on September 1 for whom the cooperant/advisor or spouse/ common-law partner has financial responsibility for visitation under a legal agreement.1 return trip in 12-month periodLocation of traveller / city of assignment MINUS contract address / city of assignment
Cooperant/advisor and/or accompanying dependant(s) travel to location of other dependant(s) under exceptional circumstances (see 5.5.2 b iii.)1 return trip in 12-month period (see 5.5.2 b iii) for conditions)City of assignment / location of other dependant(s) UP TO what would have been paid if the other dependant(s) had travelled to the city of assignment
Spouse/ common-law partner where cooperant/advisor is accompanied in the city of assignment by a dependant other than spouse/ common-law partner.NoneLocation of traveller / city of assignment UP TO cost of contract address / city of assignment
Dependant child not yet 21 years of age on September 1, and attending full-time post-secondary school in Canada.1 return trip in 12-month periodLocation of traveller / city of assignment UP TO cost of contract address / city of assignment.

b)Conditions and reporting requirements

  1. The conditions and reporting requirements for travel allowances described in Chapter 12, must be adhered to.
  2. The destination of all FRT must be the city of assignment unless Section 5.5.2 b) iii) (below) applies. It is not the intention of this benefit to allow the cooperant/advisor to take extra vacations in Canada by "trading" travel entitlements with the traveller eligible to travel.
  3. In exceptional circumstances, such as an unaccompanied assignment, unhealthy or unsafe city of assignment, travel from the city of assignment to the location of the non-accompanying dependant(s), may be authorized by the Administration Officer. As the FRT entitlement applies to the non-accompanying dependant(s), the FRTA shall not exceed the amount of allowance that would normally have been paid for the non-accompanying dependant(s) to visit the city of assignment. In addition, when FRT is authorized, one (1) FRT entitlement for each eligible dependant is liquidated. Approved annual leave must accompany FRT requests.
  4. FRT must be authorized in advance by the Administrative Officer.
  5. Proof of full time attendance at a school may be requested by the Administrative Officer.
  6. Where the student dependant travelling on FRT does not reside at the contract address,the Administrative Officer will pay an FRTA for the cost of transportation up to the cost of return transportation from the educational institution of the student dependant to the city of assignment.
  7. Visits of one week or less will not be approved.
  8. FRT must be taken by student dependants, in order to join their parents, during the Christmas and/or summer school breaks.
  9. FRT must be used for the purpose intended.

c)Procedures and method of calculation of the FRTA

  1. At least two (2) months prior to FRT, the cooperant/advisor must submit a signed and completed "Request for Family Reunion Allowance" form (Appendix 6) to the Administrative Officer. Official commercial travel agency air fare quotes, indicating the lowest available return air fare, including APEX and charters and other discounted fares for most direct routing, must be submitted with the form.
    In determining the cooperant/advisor's share of transportation expenses (i.e. if a "MINUS" factor applies in the above table), quotes for the same class of air fare as was used for the FRTA shall be submitted.
  2. the FRTA is one hundred percent (100%) of lowest available airfare quotes (including taxes) and local transportation costs to and from the airport in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive. If local transportation is by personal motor vehicle, the amount shall be in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive Canadian kilometre rate or, for international kilometre rates, at the kilometre rate at locations abroad (tax paid) published in the Treasury Board Travel Directive by Foreign Affairs Canada (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).
  3. The applicable Bank of Canada exchange rate (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) is the rate effective the date of the air fare quote.
  4. If the cooperant/advisor is travelling on a pre-approved FRT (see Section 5.5.2 b) iii)), approved leave must accompany the request for the FRTA.
  5. The amount of the FRTA will be subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer who will then arrange for payment of the FRTA to the cooperant/advisor. Payment will not be made more than sixty (60) days prior to travel.
  6. Within thirty (30) days of completion of FRT, the cooperant/advisor must complete and submit to the Administrative Officer, the Allowance Certification form (Appendix 11) described in Chapter 12 and must retain evidence, for a period of seven (7) years, that the FRTA was used for the purpose intended.
  7. The Administrative Officer reviews the Allowance Certification form and recuperates unsubstantiated amounts.
  8. No further allowance will be authorized until the required Allowance Certification has been submitted.

5.5.3 Other family reunion travel benefits - accountable

The cost of vaccinations (see Chapter 2.1.1 b) and visas (see Chapter 2.4 c).

5.6 Education Travel (hereinafter called ET)

5.6.1 Purpose of education travel

The purpose of education travel is to cover a student dependant's transportation expenses to attend an approved school away from the city of assignment in accordance with Chapter 8, where neither the relocation travel nor family reunion travel apply.

5.6.2 Education Travel Allowance (hereinafter called ETA)

The cooperant/advisor is entitled to an ETA reflecting the lowest available airfare, including APEX, charters and other reduced or discounted fares, for the most direct routing as indicated in 5.6.2 b)ii) below.

  1. Conditions and reporting requirements
    1. The conditions and reporting requirements for non-accountable travel allowances as described in Chapter 12 must be adhered to.
    2. The cooperant/advisor must be receiving an education allowance as described in Chapter 8 on behalf of the student dependant travelling.
    3. ET is available when education facilities in the city of assignment are incompatible or, when by parental choice, a secondary level student dependant attends school away from the city of assignment.
  2. Procedures and method of calculation for the ETA
    1. The cooperant/advisor submits a signed and completed "Request for Education Travel Allowance" form (Appendix 7) to the Administrative Officer. Appropriate commercial travel agency quotes, clearly indicating the lowest available return air fare, including APEX and charters and other discounted fares for most direct routing, must be submitted with the form.
    2. The ETA consists of the following elements:
      • one hundred percent (100%) of lowest available airfare quotes (including taxes):
      • from the city of assignment to the location of the school when the student dependant has been residing with the cooperant/advisor in the city of assignment, up to the cost of transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the contract address;
      • from the city of assignment to the location of the school when the student dependant travelled to the city of assignment with the cooperant/advisor under a Relocation Travel Allowance (RTA), up to the cost of transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the contract address;
      • from the contract address to the location of the school when the student dependant does not accompany the cooperant/advisor on relocation to the city of assignment;
      • from the location of the school to the contract address at the end of the cooperant's/advisor's contract;
      • in the case of a cross-posting, from the former city of assignment to the location of the school.
      • Local transportation costs to and from the airport, at origin and destination, can be included in the ETA. If ETA will be by personal motor vehicle the Treasury Board Travel Directive will be used to determine the kilometer rate payable (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).
    3. The applicable Bank of Canada exchange rate (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) is the rate effective the date of the air fare quote.
    4. Where, in exceptional circumstances, education has been approved by the Technical Assistance Unit at a school in a third location, the ETA shall not exceed the cost of the lowest available airfare from the city of assignment to the contract address.
    5. The amount of the ETA will be subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer who will then arrange for payment of the ETA to the cooperant/advisor. Payment will not be made more than sixty (60) days prior to travel.
    6. Within thirty (30) days of completion of ET, the cooperant/advisor must complete and submit to the Administrative Officer, the Allowance Certification form (Appendix 11) as described in Chapter 12 and must retain evidence that the ETA was used for the purpose intended.
    7. Cooperants/advisors must be able to demonstrate that the ETA was used for the purpose intended.
    8. The Administrative Officer reviews the Allowance Certification form and recuperates unsubstantiated amounts.
    9. No further allowance will be authorized until the required Allowance Certification has been submitted to the Administrative Officer.

5.6.3 Accountable expenses related to education travel

The cost of vaccinations (see Chapter 2.1.1 b)) and visas (see Chapter 2.4 c)).

5.7 Compassionate Travel (hereinafter called CT)

5.7.1 Purpose of compassionate travel

The purpose of the compassionate travel is to compensate the cooperant/advisor, in accordance with the Eligibility Table in Section 5.7.2 below, for travel costs arising as a result of the critical illness, critical injury or death of a family member which are over and above those that would have been incurred had the cooperant/advisor been residing at the contract address.

5.7.2 Compassionate Travel Allowance (hereinafter called CTA)

The cooperant/advisor is entitled to an allowance reflecting the lowest available airfare, including APEX, charters and other reduced or discounted fares, for the most direct routing at the time travel arrangements are made. Discounted fares may not be available when it is necessary to arrange travel on short notice.

a.Eligibility

CT will be granted for critical illness/injury or death of the following family members:

Compassionate Travel Table - Critical Illness/Injury or Death
Person AffectedTravellerCompassionate Travel Allowance
Cooperant/
advisor
Spouse/common-law partner residing in the city of assignment.Critical illness/injury while on duty travel: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the location of the person affected.
Death while on duty travel: Relocation provisions apply immediately; OR Return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of death and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment). Relocation provisions will apply immediately upon return to the city of assignment.
Death while in the city of assignment: relocation provisions apply.
 Spouse/common-law partner not residing in the city of assignment.Critical illness/injury while in the city of assignment or while on duty travel: return transportation expenses between the place of residence of the traveller and the location of the person affected MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of residence of the traveller.
 Dependant child residing in the city of assignment, and student dependant.Death: relocation provisions apply.
 Suitable person Note: In considering travel for a "suitable person", the Administrative Officer shall take into account the possible need for legal authorization for medical or surgical procedures or health care and shall ensure that the person travelling possesses the appropriate legal responsibility.Critical illness/injury of a cooperant/advisor who is unaccompanied at the city of assignment or, who is a single parent whose accompanying dependants are all under the age of 21: return transportation expenses between the place of residence of the traveller and the city of assignment and/or to the location where the cooperant/advisor is undergoing medical treatment MINUS return transportation expenses between the place of residence of the traveller and the contract address.
Dependant residing in the city of assignment.Cooperant/advisor and all dependants residing in the city of assignment, and student dependant.Death: return transportation expenses between the place of residence of the traveller and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
Dependant not residing in the city of assignment.Cooperant/advisor and/or spouse/common-law partner residing in the city of assignment.Critical illness/injury: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of residence of the person affected MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of residence of the person affected. Death: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of death and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
 Dependant residing in the city of assignment and student dependant.Death: return transportation expenses between the place of residence of the traveller and location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
Student dependant not residing in the city of assignment.Cooperant/advisor, spouse/common-law partner residing in the city of assignment, and an infant or small child who is obliged to accompany a parent.Serious/Critical illness/injury: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of residence of the person affected. Death: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of death and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
 Dependants residing in the city of assignment and student dependant.Death: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the location of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
Non-dependant child (but not of a previous relationship) of the cooperant or advisor or their spouse/ common-law partner.Cooperant/advisor and/or spouse/common-law partner residing in the city of assignment.Critical illness/injury or death: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS the cost of return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
 Dependants residing in the city of assignment and student dependant.Death: return transportation expenses between the place of residence of the traveller and the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS the cost of return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
Non-dependant child of a previous relationship of the cooperant/ advisor or their spouse/ common-law partner.Parent of the non-dependant child residing in the city of assignment and an infant or small child who is obliged to accompany the parent.Critical illness/injury or death: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS the cost of return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
Parent of the cooperant/ advisor or their spouse/
common-law partner.
Cooperant/advisor and/or their spouse/ common-law partner residing in the city of assignment and an infant or small child who is obliged to accompany a parent.Critical illness/injury or death: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS the cost of return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment).
Brother or sister (includes half-brother and half-sister) of the cooperant/ advisor or their spouse/ common-law partner.Cooperant/advisor or their spouse/ common-law partner residing in the city of assignment.Critical illness/injury or death: return transportation expenses between the city of assignment and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS the cost of return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of residence of the person affected or the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment). The Administrative Officer may request proof of kinship from the cooperant/advisor.
Non-custodial parent of a dependant child.Dependant child residing in the city of assignment, and/or a student dependant.Death: return transportation expenses between the place of residence of the traveller and the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment), MINUS return transportation expenses between the contract address and the place of interment or memorial service (where this is in lieu of interment). Authorization may be granted for the custodial parent to accompany the dependant child. The Administrative Officer should review each request for travel by the custodial parent on a case-by-case basis, considering the age and maturity of the child, the child's relationship with the non-custodial parent and the child's emotional state.

b.Conditions and reporting requirements

  1. The conditions and reporting requirements for travel allowances as described in Chapter 12 must be adhered to.
  2. CT may only be used once for critical illness and once for the death of each person visited.
  3. All transportation will be by air, taking the most direct and economical airfare possible. The allowance shall never exceed full economy class fare.
  4. CT must be supported either by a death certificate or certification from a qualified medical practitioner that the life of the person visited was endangered and that the presence of the family member(s) was required. The pertinent certificate will be submitted to the Administrative Officer within thirty (30) days after completion of travel.
  5. Compassionate leave may be granted with the approved CT (see Chapter 6.4). Travel time as indicated in Chapter 4.2.2 d) may also be granted.
  6. CT shall not apply when a member of the family unit is already at the location of the affected person.

c.Procedures and method of calculation for the CTA

  1. The cooperant/advisor submits a signed and completed "Request for Compassionate Travel Allowance" (Appendix 8) form to the Administrative Officer. Appropriate commercial travel agency quotes, indicating available discounted fares between the location of the traveller and the destination must be submitted with the form. If the cooperant/advisor will be responsible for a portion of the airfare (i.e. if a "MINUS" factor applies in the above table), an additional quote from the commercial travel agency must be submitted.
    In determining the cooperant/advisor's share of transportation expenses, (i.e. if a "MINUS" factor applies in the above table) one of the two following equally admissible methods will be used:
    1. quotes for the same class of air fare as was used for the CT shall be submitted. Where Canadian airlines provide special fares or rebates for compassionate travel in the event of bereavement, the share shall be based on the discounted fare, notwithstanding the fact that the actual airline used did not offer a compassionate discount and travel on a Canadian airline was not available or timely;
      OR
    2. The initial CTA is one hundred percent (100%) of the paid invoice issued by a commercial travel agency which represented the lowest available fare at the time of booking. The initial CTA may be adjusted in accordance with v below.
  2. The applicable Bank of Canada exchange rate (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) is the rate effective the date of the air fare quote.
  3. The amount of the CTA will be subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer who will then arrange for payment of the CTA to the cooperant/advisor.
  4. Within thirty (30) days of completion of travel, the cooperant/advisor must complete and submit to the Administrative Officer, the Allowance Certification form (Appendix 11) as described in Chapter 12.
  5. Cooperants/advisors must be able to demonstrate that the CTA was used for the purpose intended.
  6. The Administrative Officer reviews the Allowance Certification form and recuperates unsubstantiated amounts, including adjustments for the cooperant's/advisor's share of travelling expenses and bereavement fare rebates received by the cooperant/advisor.
  7. No further allowance will be authorized until the required Allowance Certification has been submitted.

5.7.3 Accountable expenses related to compassionate travel

none.

5.8 Death at Place of Assignment

If a cooperant/advisor or an accompanying dependant dies during the period of assignment, the cooperant's/advisor's personal medical insurance covers the necessary costs of "repatriation of the body".

In the event of the death of the cooperant/advisor, relocation provisions apply to accompanying dependants and student dependants.


The cooperant/advisor must observe the hours and days of work established by the country of assignment. Generally, local holidays will be observed, however, in certain countries, the CIDA Field Representative may advise that a combined schedule of local and Canadian statutory holidays be followed.

The total number of such holidays shall not exceed the number usually allowed in Canada. The schedule established by the CIDA Field Representative shall apply throughout the entire period of the contract, including any time spent away from the city of assignment e.g. for annual leave or business travel.


Chapter 6 - Leave

6.2 Annual Leave

The type of work done by the cooperant/advisor and conditions of work in the city of assignment may have a direct bearing on the timing of annual leave. For example, if the cooperant/advisor is assigned to an educational institution, annual leave will normally be taken during regular school vacation periods established by this institution.

6.2.1 Cooperant

Annual leave credits, normally 20 working days, will be earned in accordance with the provisions of the contract and are based on a 5-day work week.
Annual leave should be approved at least two months in advance by the Project Manager. A copy of the approved leave must be forwarded to the Administration Officer.
All annual leave credits must be used during the period of the contract. Unused annual leave can be carried forward if the contract is extended. If the Project Manager has requested, in writing, postponement of the cooperant's annual leave for project-related needs resulting in unused annual leave at the end of assignment, the cooperant may claim compensation in accordance with the remuneration clauses of the contract. The request for compensation of unused leave must be accompanied by the Project Manager's written request for postponement. For the purpose of such compensation, the daily fee will be established by dividing the gross annual fee by 260.
In the case of a "continuous assignment" (see definitions), leave and travel entitlements can be carried over.

6.2.2 Advisor

Annual leave credits are established during negotiations between CIDA and the executing agency and are included in the advisor's contract. Executing agencies can use Section 6.2.1 as a guideline.

6.3 Sick Leave

All absences must be reported immediately to the Project Manager for approval. All approved sick leave must be forwarded to the Administrative Officer.

6.3.1 Cooperant

Sick leave credits are earned at the rate of one and one-quarter (1 1/4) days for each completed month of service. Unused credits are carried forward if the contract is extended and for a "continuous assignment" (see definitions). If there is interruption between two contracts, unused sick leave credits cannot be transferred to the new contract. Compensation will not be given for unused sick leave credits.

6.3.2 Advisor

Sick leave credits are established during negotiations between CIDA and the executing agency and are included in the advisors contract. Executing agencies can use 6.3.1 as a guideline.

6.4 Compassionate Leave

If compassionate travel is approved by the Project Manager, the cooperant/advisor may be entitled to paid compassionate leave of up to three (3) working days, plus travel time as indicate in Chapter 4.2.2 d).

Compassionate travel must be supported either by a death certificate or certification from a qualified medical practitioner that the life of the person visited was endangered and that the presence of the family member(s) was required. Approved leave must be forwarded to the Administrative Officer.

6.5 Other Leave - Cooperants

There is no provision in the cooperant contract to accumulate or claim for any other type of leave. For example, there is no provision in the contract for compensatory leave, compensation for overtime worked, maternity leave, parental leave, or leave-without-remuneration.


Chapter 7 - Housing

This chapter does not apply if the cooperant/advisor is owner or co-owner of the occupied accommodation in the city of assignment. No housing allowance will be paid, nor will any furnishings for the accommodation be paid by the CIDA project.
Housing may be provided at no cost to the cooperant/advisor by the country of assignment. The mechanisms for its provision vary depending on the country of assignment.

7.1 Housing Allowance

The housing allowance paid to the cooperant/advisor includes the rent of the approved rental property and a portion of the public utilities (see Section 7.1.1 to 7.1.3), minus any amounts provided by the country of assignment.
If the country of assignment does not provide the cooperant/advisor with adequate housing or an adequate housing allowance, the Administrative Officer may issue an allowance to supplement the allowance provided by the country of assignment, for rent and utilities in accordance with 7.1.1 to 7.1.3).

Rent may include charges or taxes for municipal services such as fire protection, police protection, street cleaning, mail delivery, street lighting, snow removal, as well as condominium fees and similar charges or taxes such as subdivision fees. Rent may also include the monthly cost of monitoring a previously installed security system, where this is a condition of the lease and the Project Manager is satisfied that a security system is a necessity.

A rent ceiling will be established by the Administrative Officer, in consultation with the Project Manager, based on rental properties in the city of assignment that are the size of accommodation to which the cooperant/advisor is entitled (see table below). When the accommodation is within the entitlement size, the rent ceiling will be equal to the actual rent.

Signing the lease
If housing is not provided by the country of assignment, the cooperant/advisor will sign a lease for their rental accommodation. For the cooperant, the lease must be signed by the cooperant
The lease must include provision for repairs and maintenance by the landlord.

7.1.2 Size of accommodation - criteria for establishing rent ceiling

The cooperant/advisor is entitled to a housing allowance which includes the rent for accommodation up to the following sizes:

Number in HouseholdNumber of BedroomsSpace
Square Meter Target
12 bedrooms90
22 bedrooms plus a den or office106
33 bedrooms plus a den or office138
44 bedrooms plus a den or office171

The space to be considered includes family areas only. Included are the entrance foyer and its coatroom/coat closet, powder rooms, living, dining, kitchen, food storage, bedrooms, bathrooms and den/family rooms. Excluded are closets and storage areas (other than those noted), stairways, hallways, side and service entrances, laundry, furnace and mechanical/electrical equipment rooms, and servants quarters (if applicable). Measurements are inside-wall to inside-wall;
The cooperant/advisor may rent accommodation which is one level higher than the actual household size to recognize the impending birth or adoption of a child.
Accommodation larger than entitlement:
When a cooperant/advisor chooses to rent accommodation larger than that described in the table, the rent ceiling amount established by the Administrative Officer, in consultation with the Project Manager, will be used as the amount to be included in the housing allowance, and not the actual rent paid by the cooperant/advisor. The cooperant/advisor will be financially responsible for this additional rent.

7.1.3 Utility costs

Utility costs are mainly the cooperant's/advisor's responsibility. However, because utilities may be very expensive in certain countries, the cooperant/advisor can request an additional housing allowance to cover fifty percent (50%) of the portion of estimated monthly admissible utility costs in excess of two hundred and fifty Canadian dollars (C$250) (as of February 1, 2004). Periodic adjustments to this amount will be published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook.

Admissible utility costs consist of the following:

  • electricity
  • gas
  • rental and repair of meters
  • identifiable water costs,
  • sewerage
  • garbage collection
  • primary fuel used for cooking
  • pest control where required by local law or where considered by the Project Manager to be in excess of the cooperant or advisor's personal responsibility. Such charges shall be limited to those that would not normally be incurred in Canada or would be the responsibility of the landlord or appropriate local authority such as the municipal health or sanitation department. In considering charges for pest control, the Project Manager shall take into account any recommendation or advice from Health Canada and local health authority
  • licence fees imposed by the country of assignment for one television set, one car radio and one radio in the home.
  • fuel used for heating, including the cost of firewood where this is a primary source of heat or where this is an essential source of heat to supplement an inadequate heating system or where used in fuel-efficient fireplaces designed to reduce energy consumption

including sales or excise taxes in respect of those charges specified above.
Inadmissible utility costs include the following:

  • installation and monthly charges for telephone, internet, antenna, cable or satellite.
  • swimming pool maintenance and repair.
  • personal services, including those provided by doormen, janitors, maids, concierges and gardeners.

7.1.4 Procedures to receive a housing allowance

  • The cooperant/advisor will submit to the Administrative Officer a completed and signed "Housing Allowance" form (Appendix 9).
  • A housing allowance shall normally be requested for a twelve (12) month period only (for cooperants: May to April). For the first housing allowance request, the allowance may include the estimated rent, amounts to cover deposits required at the time of signing the lease and any "finders fees" that may have to be paid for finding the property. Additional allowances can be requested to cover the estimated utility costs described in 7.1.3.
  • A copy of the lease must be included with the first request for the Housing Allowance. A copy of new leases or lease renewals must also be submitted to the Administrative Officer.
  • The exchange rate is determined by the Administrative Officer based on the Bank of Canada exchange rate in effect when the allowance is issued.
  • The amount of the housing allowance will be subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer who will then arrange for payment of the housing allowance to the cooperant/advisor.
  • The cooperant/advisor is responsible for any exchange rate and bank transfer fees.
  • Refundable deposits paid as part of the first housing allowance shall be deducted from the last year's housing allowance.
  • Cooperants/advisors must retain evidence of housing expenditures for a period of seven (7) years. If, when requested, the cooperant/advisor cannot demonstrate that the allowance was used for the purpose intended, the allowance will be reduced by the unsubstantiated amount.

7.1.5 Moving from the permanent accommodation in city of assignment during the assignment

In the event that the cooperant/advisor moves from their rented accommodation before the end of the period included in the request for Housing Allowance, the cooperant/advisor must inform the Project Manager and the Administrative Officer. A revised Housing Allowance form shall be submitted for approval to the Administrative Officer who will then adjust the amount of the allowance as required. All moving costs incurred by the cooperant/advisor in the city of assignment due to a change in permanent accommodation shall be the responsibility of the cooperant/advisor unless the move has been approved by the Project Manager and the Administrative Officer.

7.2 Furniture

Where adequate furniture has not been provided by the country of assignment, or available in the rented accommodation, project funds may be allocated for the purchase of basic hard furnishings (see Section 7.2.1) if the Project Manager agrees and if project funds are available.

According to the situation in the country of assignment, and with prior written approval from the Project Manager, the basic hard furnishings may be purchased locally or imported from the most practical and economical alternate sources. A detailed inventory of furnishings purchased must be submitted to the Administrative Officer.

Any furniture thus acquired belongs to the project and not to the cooperant/advisor. At the end of the assignment, the furniture may be kept for the use of other cooperants/advisors, turned over to the country of assignment or institution, or disposed of in accordance with Treasury Board rules and regulations. Needs and availability will vary from one location to another.

Responsibility for wear, maintenance and repair of furnishings provided by the project: The cooperant/advisor is responsible for repair of damage caused by fault or negligence of the cooperant/advisor, or their household members, guests, or domestic help. Normal wear and tear on the furnishings are not the responsibility of the cooperant/advisor.

7.2.1 Basic hard furnishings

The items listed below may be authorized for purchase by the Program Manager when required and if project funds are available. This list is to be used as guidelines only and not entitlements.

Basic furniture:

  • stove
  • refrigerator
  • table and chairs
  • buffet
  • bookshelves
  • couch
  • easy chairs
  • coffee table
  • end tables
  • beds, including mattresses
  • night tables
  • dressers
  • clothes cupboards
  • desk and chairs
  • curtains
  • washing machine, drying rack
  • Normal fixtures such as: shower rod, towel racks, medicine chest, bathroom mirror, light fixtures, curtain rods.

In some locations, the following items may also be considered necessary:

  • air conditioners (one for each occupied bedroom plus living and dining room), fans, heaters, transformers, voltage regulators, lamps, water filter, clothes dryer, dehumidifier, humidifier.

For the cooperant, the Project Manager will confirm whether such items are required. For the advisor, the executing agency will obtain prior approval from the CIDA Project Manager at CIDA Headquarters, before purchasing furniture or other necessary items with project funds.

7.2.2 Inadmissible furnishings

Without limiting the scope of article 7.2, the following items are not basic hard furnishings:
Television sets, VCRs, DVD players, satellite dishes, stereos, kitchen utensils, small appliances, vacuum cleaners, bedding, rugs, mirrors (except in bathroom), filing cabinets, ironing boards, patio furniture, gardening tools, lawn mowers.


Chapter 8 - Education

Cooperants/advisors are entitled to an education allowance to cover admissible education expenses for each student dependant, from junior kindergarten up to and including the secondary level, and conditional on certain restrictions described herein. Theamountof the allowance is intended to cover the education costs that exceed those the parents would normally pay to send a child to public school in Canada.

8.1 Criteria for Assessing Education and Educational Facility Compatibility

Compatible education: means an education system which provides an educational curriculum and services compatible with those normally provided without charge in schools in Ontario from junior kindergarten to secondary school graduation, taking into consideration:

  1. the desirability of continuation in the child's educational stream, and
  2. the educational history and other personal factors pertinent to the child's education. In deciding whether a school is compatible, the cooperant/advisor, and the Project Manager or the Administrative Officer should discuss the various schools with Canadians already residing in the city of assignment.

Compatible educational facility: The following factors can be used in assessing a compatible educational facility:

  • the desirability if continuation in the child's educational stream,
  • instruction in the appropriate official language (English or French),
  • schooling in a safe, healthy and secure environment,
  • a curriculum which is reasonably compatible with the curriculum of the public school system in the province of Ontario or equivalent in other provinces,
  • an environment free of problems arising from racial segregation or hostility to foreigners,
  • schooling free from compulsory, incompatible religious instruction,
  • Roman Catholic education, a right which is confirmed in the Constitution of Canada, comparable to that provided by the Ontario Ministry of Education,, if required by the cooperant/advisor,
  • schooling where there is no lack of confidence in the school staff or in the prevailing climate of morality among the school's student population.

The compatible english school at the city of assignment is normally the United States international school and the compatible french school is normally the french lycée. A list of english schools is published by the U.S. Department of State, Office of Overseas Schools and a list of french schools is published by the Agence pour l'enseignement français à l'étranger (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

8.2 Education Allowance

An education allowance will be issued annually, to cover admissible education expenses described in Section 8.2.9 and 8.2.10.
An education allowance can be provided for a student dependant to complete:

  1. one (1) year of junior kindergarten and one (1) year of kindergarten optional programs, as offered by the Ontario Ministry of Education for students aged 3 years 8 months/4years 8 months as of September 1 of the school year, or as of January 1 of the school year in the southern hemisphere.
  2. eight (8) years of elementary school programs equivalent to Ontario grades 1 to 8 , or six (6) years of such programs equivalent to Quebec grades 1 to 6.
  3. four (4) years of secondary school programs equivalent to Ontario grades 9 to 12, or five (5) years of such programs equivalent to Quebec grades Secondary I to Secondary V plus two (2) years of general pre-university CEGEP I and II in Quebec, up to and including the school year of the student dependant's 20th birthday.

As education in the province of Quebec is under review, these levels will be reviewed annually with changes published as an amendment to this Handbook in September of the year of change.
School year for an educational allowance means the actual academic year, which is normally September to August 31 in the northern hemisphere and January 1 to December 31 in the southern hemisphere.

8.2.1 Eligibility for education allowance

When a student dependant attends school in the city of assignment, elsewhere in the country of assignment, in Canada or, in exceptional circumstances, in a third country, the cooperant/advisor can receive an education allowance only in the following circumstances:

  1. If the school is compatible in the city of assignment, an education allowance will only be paid for:
    • elementary and secondary level student dependants attending school in the city of assignment.
    • secondary level student dependants attending school in Canada and not living with a parent of the student dependant.
  2. If the schools are incompatible in the city of assignment, an education allowance will only be paid for:
    • elementary and secondary level student dependants taking home schooling program in the city of assignment.
    • elementary and secondary level student dependants attending school in the country of assignment.
    • elementary and secondary level student dependants attending school in Canada, provided they are not living with a parent.
    • under exceptional circumstances, secondary level student dependants in a third country (see Section 8.2.5).

8.2.2 Schooling in the city of assignment

The Education Allowance shall be based on the admissible education expenses of the representative school in the city of assignment, which means the least costly compatible school in the city of assignment.

Home schooling

The cooperant/advisor may choose to have a child educated at home in the city of assignment. An education plan, with proof from the Provincial Home Schooling Program that it meets provincial requirements, must be submitted to the Administrative Officer.

The Administrative Officer may authorize an education allowance for home schooling to include admissible education expenses such as the costs of textbooks, school supplies and other expenses that would be authorized under the Home Schooling Program.

The maximum education allowance for home schooling shall not exceed the fees charged for the representative school in the city of assignment, or where there is no representative school, up to the non-resident school fees for public education in Canada published annually in September in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

8.2.3 Schooling elsewhere in the country of assignment

strong>An education allowance for schooling in the country of assignment will only be authorized if education in the city of assignment is not compatible. The cooperant/advisor shall submit to the Administrative Officer a detailed costing of the school fees from the proposed compatible education facility. The Administrative Officer will establish the education allowance based on admissible education expenses.

8.2.4 Schooling in Canada

An education allowance for schooling in Canada will be authorized for secondary level student dependants, regardless of the compatibility of schools in the city of assignment. For elementary level student dependants, an education allowance for schooling in Canada will only be authorized if education facilities in the city of assignment are incompatible. However, if the student dependant, whether elementary or secondary level, is residing in Canada with a parent, spouse/ common-law partner or ex-spouse/common-law partner of the cooperant/advisor, no education allowance is payable. Student dependants may choose various options for education in Canada:

  1. Public schools. The cooperant/advisor may arrange for the child to live in Canada with friends or relatives and attend public school. Parents who are not taxpayers in the area where their child is attending school may be charged non-resident school fees. The maximum amount payable for this fee is updated every September 1st, and is published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook. If the child is living in private accommodation, but not with the parent or spouse/common-law partner or ex-spouse/common-law partner, the cooperant/advisor may include in the allowance request, an amount to cover the estimated cost of the child's board, lodging, laundering and mending. This amount shall not exceed the maximum monthly amount payable for board and lodging found in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). This amount is reviewed each year and changes will be published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook each September 1st. The maximum period for board and lodging that can be requested for each school year is 10 months or, for CEGEP, for the months of scheduled instruction. The education allowance cannot include any local transportation costs.
  2. Residential school. Where public schooling and room and board cannot be arranged, an annual education allowance ceiling for residential school is published each September 1st in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook. The cooperant/advisor must choose a residential educational institution which offers boarding seven days a week except in Quebec where boarding is only available five days a week. The amount for weekend board and lodging while attending a Quebec residential institution is published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address), and can be included in the education allowance.

8.2.5 Schooling in a third country

An education allowance may be paid for secondary level student dependants attending school in a third country only when the education facilities in the city of assignment are not compatible and only under exceptional circumstances.
When a student dependant attends a school away from the country of assignment and not in Canada, CIDA-funded projects will NOT normally pay for that schooling. However, exceptional circumstances may exist where permission may be given for a secondary level student dependant to attend an educational facility in a third country. Every request for schooling in a third country must be submitted for the prior approval of the Technical Assistance Unit. The written request must include a justification of the reasons the student dependant must attend a school in a third location, and the reason the student dependant cannot be educated in the country of assignment or in Canada.
The only schools in third countries that the Technical Assistance Unit might approve is at the Canadian curriculum secondary school which is nearest to the cooperant or advisor's city of assignment, and which is inspected by the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training. An education allowance for schooling in a third location shall not be approved for cooperants/advisors posted to South America, Central America or the Caribbean.
An allowance can be issued to cover estimated admissible education expenses, up to the Canadian residential school education allowance, as published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

8.2.6 Education ceilings

An education ceiling for Canadian residential schools is published annually in September in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). They represent the maximum amount for fees charged by the schools that can be included in the Education Allowance calculation for student dependants approved to attend a Canadian residential school.

Maximum Eligible Education Allowance
Place of EducationEducation in the City of AssignmentLevel of EducationMaximum Eligible Allowance
City of AssignmentCompatibleElementary and SecondaryAdmissible education expenses to attend the representative school in the city of assignment. The representative school will be the least expensive compatible school.
IncompatibleElementary and SecondaryHome schooling allowance up to the admissible education expenses of the representative school in the city of assignment. If a representative school is not established, an allowance to cover admissible education expenses up to the non-resident school fees for public education in Canada
Country of AssignmentCompatibleElementary and SecondaryNone
IncompatibleElementary and SecondaryMaximum allowance must be approved by Administration Officer.
CanadaCompatibleElementaryNone
SecondaryNon-resident school fees to attend public school plus board and lodging costs in accordance with the amounts published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook, or, if applicable, the ceiling for Canadian residential schooling.
IncompatibleElementary and SecondaryNon-resident school fees to attend public school plus board and lodging costs in accordance with the amounts published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook, or, if applicable, the ceiling for Canadian residential schooling.
Third CountryCompatibleElementary and SecondaryNone
IncompatibleElementaryNone
Secondary *Ceiling for Canadian residential schooling.

* only with prior approval from CIDA's Technical Assistance Unit.

8.2.7 Conditions and reporting requirements

  • No education allowance will be paid on behalf of a student dependant who does not accompany the cooperant/advisor to the city of assignment and who lives with a parent or the cooperant's/advisor's spouse/common-law partner or ex-spouse/ex-common-law partner.
  • No education allowance will be paid where non-fee paying schools are compatible in the city of assignment.
  • No education allowance will be paid on behalf of an elementary level student dependant who receives education in Canada or a third country if educational facilities in the city of assignment are compatible.
  • No education allowance will be reimbursed for student dependants studying beyond the secondary or senior matriculation level or equivalent. The senior matriculation equivalency varies from province to province. For example, in Quebec, CEGEP II is considered equivalent to senior matriculation, and is thus considered part of secondary education.
  • Admissible education costs are limited to the 10 month school period, or, for CEGEP, for the months of scheduled instruction.
  • No more than thirty (30) days after the end of the school year, an attendance certificate issued by the school must be submitted to the Administrative Officer.
  • Cooperants/advisors must retain evidence of expenditures related to the allowance for a period of seven (7) years. If, when requested, the cooperant/advisor cannot demonstrate that the allowance was used for the purpose intended, the allowance will be reduced by the unsubstantiated amount.

8.2.8 Procedures for calculation and issuance of the education allowance

  • The cooperant/advisor submits to the Administrative Officer, as soon as the school fees are known, the Request for Education Allowance form (Appendix 10) for one full school year. Expenses that may be included on the form are the admissible expenses detailed in Sections 8.2.9 and 8.2.10.
  • The amount of the education allowance will be subject to the prior verification and approval of the Administrative Officer who will then arrange for payment of the education allowance in Canadian funds, ensuring the amount does not exceed maximum eligible allowance indicated in Section 8.2.6).
  • The exchange rate is determined by the Administrative Officer based on the Bank of Canada exchange rate in effect when the allowance is issued.
  • The Administrative Officer will arrange payment of the approved allowance to the cooperant's/advisor's Canadian bank account no more than 60 days in advance of the date fees are payable to the school.
  • In the event the child withdraws from the school before the end of the school year and the school provides a refund to the cooperant/advisor, the cooperant/advisor must advise the Administrative Officer immediately for the recuperation of the funds.
  • A subsequent education allowance request can be submitted to the Administrative Officer, only if unexpected expenses are incurred. (e.g. additional textbooks, courses required.).
  • No further allowance will be authorized until the required attendance certificate has been submitted.

8.2.9 Admissible education expenses

Admissible education expenses mean actual and reasonable expenses which are necessary for the education of a dependent child and represent the education expenses the parents would normally not have to pay to send a child to public school in Canada.
The following expenses, related to education, are admissible.

  1. Charges for courses, instruction, services or programs which arenormally provided free as part of the educational program within the cooperant's/advisor's province of residence, are compulsory for re-enrolment into the public education system in the province of the contract address, and are not provided free of charge at the school attended by the child such as:
    • tuition fees,
    • fees for subjects normally on the school curriculum,
    • non-refundable application fees, including fees at more than one school where the cooperant/advisor has applied to several to ensure the dependent student's registration in one, to such total amount as the Administrative Officer considers appropriate to the circumstances,
    • non-refundable registration fees,
    • entrance fees, charges for prescribed textbooks,
    • school supplies as listed in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address),
    • examination fees,
    • library fees,
    • laboratory charges and,
    • school computer user fee.
  2. When paid as a compulsory condition of enrolment
    • graduation fees,
    • school building fund fee or similar specialized disbursement for this purpose, subject to prior approval by the Administrative Officer,
    • non-resident fee,
    • athletic fees,
    • identification cards and associated pictures,
    • school foundation fee,
    • medical examination and service fees,
    • fees related to the security of the students and/or school,
    • fees for courses, instruction, services, and/or programs which are part of the curriculum of the school attended, which are paid as part of the tuition, and which are not normally provided free of charge as part of the educational program within the province of residence of the cooperant or of the advisor,
    • mid-day meal service reduced by an amount published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address), which shall be the parents' responsibility
    • accident liability insurance to protect the educational institution, and
    • the cost of pre-testing for first entry to a lycée outside Canada.
  3. Other related admissible education expenses
    • special courses, programs, private tutoring under special circumstances as outlined below
      In the previous city of assignment, prior to departure to a new city of assignment, in order to meet a requirement for a compulsory course and/or to enable the student dependant to meet the appropriate grade level at the school in the new city of assignment: fees, expenses and charges for supplementary courses or programs, or where a structured course or program is not available, private tutoring. The academic deficiency must be attributable to the CIDA overseas assignment and not due to the fault or choice of the student dependant and/or cooperant/advisor. A letter from the school principal in the new city of assignment stating the compulsory course required and the number of tutoring hours required to meet the appropriate grade level at the new school must be submitted with the Request for Education Allowance, along with a cost estimate of per-hour tutoring.
      On return to Canada, for subjects not provided by the school in the city of assignment but required by a Canadian provincial education system for secondary graduation: fees, expenses and charges for courses and/or private tutoring. A letter from the school principal at the new school must accompany the Request for Education Allowance. The letter must state the compulsory subject required and the number of estimated tutoring hours that may be required. A cost estimate of per-hour tutoring must also accompany the request.
      During the first year in the city of assignment, tutoring to bring the student dependant up to grade level at the new school: fees, expenses and charges for private tutoring in subjects where the educational level of the student dependant is below that of the class, form or grade which is attended. The academic deficiency must be attributable to the CIDA overseas assignment and not due to the fault or choice of the student dependant and/or cooperant/advisor. A letter from the school principal at the new school must accompany the Request for Education Allowance. The letter must state the subject(s) that the student dependant is below that of the class and the number of tutoring hours required to meet the appropriate grade level. A cost estimate of per-hour tutoring must also accompany the Request.
      During the assignment, if not available at the school, private tutoring in the second official language for up to 50 hours of instruction in a school year where the student dependant is being educated in the city of assignment (students in junior kindergarten and kindergarten are excluded from this entitlement). A cost estimate of per-hour tutoring must also accompany the request.
      During the assignment, where Roman Catholic instruction is not available and the student dependant would normally attend a school offering Roman Catholic religious instruction in Canada, expenses for Roman Catholic religious instruction may be included in the Request for Education Allowance. The Request for Education Allowance must include a letter from the Roman Catholic school at the contract address confirming that the student dependant attended the school. Please note that the Knights of Columbus provide online Catechism courses free of charge (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).
    • where authority has been granted for education away from the city of assignment, the cost of board and lodging, laundering and mending during the periods of scheduled instruction, up to a monthly maximum amount which is established annually and can be found in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address);
    • a student dependant with special education needs may be given a special education allowance in an amount set and approved by the Technical Assistance Unit

8.2.10 Admissible school transportation expenses

Provided by or for the school
Where school transportation is provided by or for the school, such as school bus service, the allowance is for one return trip each school day between the student's place of residence and place of education. In special situations, the education allowance may include expenses to cover school transportation costs provided by or for the school for more than one return school trip each school day. Special cases would include situations where:

  • the child is not permitted to remain in school during the mid-day break;
  • supervision is not provided during the mid-day break;
  • the school schedule provides for a mid-day break in which children are expected to return home.

Where the school arranges for transportation and the cooperant/advisor chooses to use a private motor vehicle to transport a child to school, the maximum assistance which may be included in the allowance request is up to the cost of the school-provided transportation. If the transportation fee was included in the school's tuition no further allowance will be paid.

School transportation not provided
If school transportation is not available through the school, the cooperant/advisor may include in the request for education allowance the cost of expenses for the most economical alternate arrangements possible for one round trip for each school day between the child's residence and school. Such arrangements must include carpooling where possible. In special situations, the Administrative Officer may authorize reimbursement of expenses to cover school transportation costs provided by or for the school for more than one return school trip each school day. See above, in "Provided by or for the school" for examples of special cases.
For travel by private motor vehicle, expenses will be calculated at the kilometre rate at locations abroad (tax paid) published in the Treasury Board Travel Directive by Foreign Affairs Canada (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

Exceptional circumstances
Under exceptional circumstances, such as dangerous situations in the city of assignment where additional security is required, or for physical disabilities, the amount of the education allowance can be increased to cover extra transportation costs. These circumstances must be justified to and are subject to the prior approval of the Technical Assistance Unit.

8.3 Inadmissible Education Expenses

Inadmissible expenses include costs for:

  • school pictures,
  • sports equipment,
  • school magazines,
  • refundable deposits including those for the student's personal expenses, such as textbooks, sports equipment or similar items,
  • school uniforms,
  • pocket money
  • donations, grants or similar specialized disbursements except for disbursements authorized under Section 8.2.9 a) or b),
  • field trips,
  • penalty for late payment of school fees unless due to short notice of assignment,
  • expenses for private music and dancing lessons,
  • purchase or rental of computer equipment,
  • bank transfer fees,
  • exchange rate losses.

8.4 Relocation During the School Year

When a student dependant is being educated in the city of assignment and the cooperant/advisor relocates to another city of assignment or to Canada during a school year, the student dependant, with prior approval of the Administrative Officer, may remain at the previous city of assignment to complete the semester. The Administrative Officer may authorize the amount of the allowance based on actual and reasonable admissible education expenses, including board and lodging up to the amount published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) for the balance of the semester.
When a student dependant is being educated away from the city of assignment, the annual allowance previously authorized shall remain in effect until the end of the school year.
If the student dependant moves to a new school because of the relocation, a new allowance for admissible education expenses for the balance of the school year can be issued subject to the prior approval of the Administrative Officer.

8.5 Refundable Deposits

When a refundable deposit is required as a condition of enrolment by a school, an accountable advance equal to the amount of the deposit can be issued. The refundable deposit is not meant to cover the dependant student's personal expenses (see Section 8.3 Inadmissible Education Expenses). The accountable advance must be accounted to the Administrative Officer within 10 days from the date on which it is due to be refunded from the school.


Technical Assistance Handbook—Chapter 9 — Overseas Allowances

In addition to the basic fee or salary, the cooperant/advisor receives overseas allowances consisting of a post living allowance, a post differential allowance and an overseas service premium.

These allowances are calculated and paid monthly, based on a calendar month. The allowances can change from month to month, as the variables described below can fluctuate.

9.1 Cooperant/Advisor Couple

Refer to Chapter 1.6 for benefits applying to a couple when the two persons and/or one of the other are cooperants/advisors.

9.2 Post Living Allowance (hereinafter called PLA)

9.2.1 General

To assist cooperants/advisors in country of assignments where the cost of living is higher than in Canada (Ottawa), they are provided with a PLA to compensate for the higher costs of purchasing goods and services in the city of assignment. The index is based on comparative data analysed and reported monthly by Statistics Canada. The country index is calculated in relation to Ottawa prices for goods and services, with the Ottawa index set at 100. Some countries have indices below 100 and these are rounded up to 100 to avoid a negative allowance. There is no PLA when the CIDA Index is 100 or less. The PLA is paid monthly in accordance with the Post Living Allowance Table (see Section 9.2.3). The "CIDA, Index" (CI) required for the calculation of the PLA is published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

9.2.2 Calculation of the PLA

Cooperants/advisors serving in a city of assignment for which the CIDA Index is greater than 100 will receive a PLA, where:

Cooperants/advisors serving in a city of assignment for which the CIDA Index is greater than 100 will receive a PLA, where:

  • Thenominal fee is the mid-point of a cooperant's/advisor's basic contract fee band. The nominal fee and contract fee band can be found in section 9.2.3;
  • Cooperants/ advisors are compensated for the actual percentage of the basic contract fee spent in the city of assignment, calculated on the basis of their nominalfee, and reflecting the CIDA Index adjustment. The percentage of the basic contract fee spent in the city of assignment can be found in section 9.2.3;
  • The percentage of basic contract fee spent in the city of assignment, from the said section 9.2.3, shall remain fixed for the period of the contract in a city of assignment, including contract extensions and fee increases, but excluding situations where the cooperants/advisors sign new cooperant/advisor contracts and when they undertake cross-postings. Upon a cross-posting of the cooperant/advisor or the signature by the cooperant/advisor of any new cooperant/advisor contract, a new percentage shall be established based on the nominal fee associated with the new basic contract fee and corresponding percentage adjustment (see section 9.2.3 for examples).
  • theAnnualPLA is equal to:

    Nominal Fee x Percentage of adjustment x (CIDA Index - 100)

    This amount is then divided by 12 for the monthly PLA.

  • For the cooperant, the "basic contract fee" is the annual fee indicated in the cooperant's contract. For the advisor, the "basic contract fee" does not include amounts allotted for fringe benefits, overhead and profit and does not include additional fee increases approved by the executing agency which exceed the percentage authorized in "CIDA's policy on Annual Fee and Salary Increases" (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

9.2.3 Annual Post Living Allowance Table

Table 1: Annual Post Living Allowance Table Effective April 1, 2004
Fee RangeNominal Fee% adjustment
FromTo
30,45031,44930,9500.742
31,45032,44931,9500.727
32,45033,44932,9500.712
33,45034,44933,9500.699
34,45035,44934,9500.686
35,45036,44935,9500.674
36,45037,44936,9500.662
37,45038,44937,9500.651
38,45039,44938,9500.641
39,45040,44939,9500.631
40,45041,44940,9500.622
41,45042,44941,9500.613
42,45043,44942,9500.605
43,45044,44943,9500.596
44,45045,44944,9500.586
45,45046,44945,9500.589
46,45047,44946,9500.574
47,45048,44947,9500.568
48,45049,44948,9500.561
49,45050,44949,9500.555
50,45051,44950,9500.549
51,45052,44951,9500.543
52,45053,44952,9500.537
53,45054,44953,9500.532
54,45055,44954,9500.527
55,45056,44955,9500.522
56,45057,44956,9500.517
57,45058,44957,9500.513
58,45059,44958,9500.508
59,45060,44959,9500.504
60,45061,44960,9500.500
61,45062,44961,9500.496
62,45063,44962,9500.492
63,45064,44963,9500.488
64,45065,44964,9500.484
65,45066,44965,9500.481
66,45067,44966,9500.477
67,45068,44967,9500.474
68,45069,44968,9500.471
69,45070,44969,9500.468
70,45071,44970,9500.464
71,45072,44971,9500.461
72,45073,44972,9500.459
73,45074,44973,9500.456
74,45075,44974,9500.453
75,45076,44975,9500.450
76,45077,44976,9500.448
77,45078,44977,9500.445
78,45079,44978,9500.443
79,45080,44979,9500.440
80,45081,44980,9500.438
81,45082,44981,9500.436
82,45083,44982,9500.433
83,45084,44983,9500.431
84,45085,44984,9500.429
85,45086,44985,9500.427
86,45087,44986,9500.425
87,45088,44987,9500.423
88,45089,44988,9500.421
89,45090,44989,9500.419
90,45091,44990,9500.417
91,45092,44991,9500.415
92,45093,44992,9500.414
93,45094,44993,9500.412
94,45095,44994,9500.410
95,45096,44995,9500.409
96,45097,44996,9500.407
97,45098,44997,9500.405
98,45099,44998,9500.404
99,450100,44999,9500.402
100,450etc.etc.0.401
etc.etc.etc.0.401

Note: The PLA table is updated every April 1st in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

Formula for Calculating the PLA

the Annual PLA is equal to:

Nominal Fee x Percentage of adjustment x (CIDA Index - 100)

Example #1: For a new contract and/or cross-post

Annual PLA = (current nominal fee x associated percentage adjustment x (CIDA index-100)) /100

If the Contract Fee = $70,000 and the CIDA Index = 130, then the PLA is calculated as follows:

  • A fee of $70,000 falls into the fee range of $69,450 to $70,449, of which the Nominal fee is $69,950. The corresponding percentage adjustment is .468 (see Table).
  • Annual PLA = $69,950 x .468 x (130-100)) /100
  • Annual PLA = $9820.98 or $818.42 monthly

Example #2:

For contract extensions and fee increases

Annual PLA = (current nominal fee x percentage adjustment associated with the "original contract fee" x (CIDA index-100)) /100

If the original Contract Fee = $70,000, then the corresponding percentage adjustment is .468 (see Table). This percentage remains fixed for the period of the contract in a city of assignment. This includes fee increases and contract extensions, but excludes scenarios in Example #1 above.

If the current Contract Fee = $74,000, then the current nominal fee = $73,950 (see Table) and if the CIDA Index = 130, then the PLA is calculated as follows:

  • Annual PLA = (73,950 x .468 x (130-100)) /100
  • Annual PLA = $10,382.58 or $865.22 monthly.

9.3 Post Differential Allowance (hereinafter called PDA)

A PDA is paid monthly to compensate for hardship conditions in the city of assignment (as compared to Canada) resulting from such factors as geographical isolation, language barriers, cultural differences, quality and availability of goods (e.g. bottled water), restrictions on possible leisure activities, unsanitary conditions, prevalence of diseases, lack of good health care facilities and threats to personal safety.

The PDA is determined as a function of the number of dependants residing with the cooperant/advisor in the city of assignment, and the "post rating"level established for the city of assignment. The ratings of I, II, III, IV and V reflect the level of difficulty that a Canadian can expect to face in a particular foreign country. The higher the rating, the more the conditions in the city of assignment are undesirable. The post ratings are published monthly in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

Table 2:Post Differential Allowance Table (Annual Canadian dollars - Effective April, 2004)
Post RatingUnaccompanied Cooperant/AdvisorCooperant/Advisor with one accompanying dependantCooperant/Advisor with two or more accompanying dependants
I2 6393 2963 960
II3 9634 9505 940
III5 2776 5967 917
IV7 9179 89411 873
V10 55513 19615 833

Note: The PDA table is updated every April 1st in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

9.4 Overseas Service Premium (hereinafter called OSP)

The cooperant/advisor receives a monthly OSP as an incentive to serve outside Canada. This premium has two levels according to the number of calendar months worked on Canadian funded long term assignments overseas and varies according to the number of dependants residing in the city of assignment. Level 1 applies to the first 24 calendar months of long-term assignment overseas and level 2 applies to 25 or more calendar months of long-term assignment overseas.

When cooperants/advisors provide proof of having worked on Canadian funded long-term assignments overseas, the documented period can be considered in setting the OSP level.

For calculation purposes, one month of completed long-term assignment overseas is deemed to have been accumulated when the cooperant/advisor has received OSP for at least 10 working days during a calendar month. A cooperant/advisor cannot accumulate more than one credit for each calendar month (e.g. in cases of cross-posting, new cooperant/advisor contracts).

Note: No OSP will be payable to a cooperant/advisor who has served 7 or more consecutive years in the same city of assignment.

Table 3: Overseas Service Premium Table (Annual Canadian dollars - Effective April, 2004)
Level of serviceUnaccompanied Cooperant / AdvisorCooperant / Advisor with one accompanying dependantCooperant / Advisor with two or more accompanying dependants
1 (1-24 calendar months)5,2397,2018,839
2 (25+ calendar months)7,85610,80413,255

Note: The OSP table is updated every April 1st in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

9.5 Periods of Application

9.5.1 Commencement and end of overseas allowances

The overseas allowances commence on the first calendar day following the cooperant's/advisor's permanent arrival in the city of assignment, or the first day of the contract, whichever is the latter, and ceases on the day of the cooperant's/advisor's final departure from the city of assignment, or on the final day of the contract, whichever comes first. The cooperant/advisor must inform the Administrative Officer of their permanent arrival and departure dates.

When an accompanying dependant permanently arrives in the city of assignment, the cooperant/advisor must inform the Administrative Officer of their arrival in order to initiate adjustments to the overseas allowances. The adjustments to the overseas allowances are effective the first calendar day following the permanent arrival of the dependant in the city of assignment. When a dependant permanently leaves the city of assignment, the cooperant/advisor must inform the Administrative Officer of their departure in order to initiate adjustments to the overseas allowances. The adjustments to the overseas allowances are effective the day of the dependant's permanent departure from the city of assignment.

9.5.2 Periods of less than one month

For a period of less than one calendar month, the allowance will be prorated based on the number of calendar days in that month. The formula for prorating allowances is as follows:

9.5.3 Temporary absences

The Post Living Allowance, Overseas Service Premium, and Post Differential Allowance are adjusted during periods when the cooperant/advisor and/or accompanying dependant(s) are away from the city of assignment, for any reason, for more than twenty-five (25) working days. These allowances are adjusted on the 26th working day of absence to reflect the change in family configuration. The allowances cease on the 26th working day of absence, if the cooperant/advisor and all accompanying dependants are absent from the city of assignment. These allowances resume on the first calendar day following the return of the cooperant/advisor and/or dependant(s) to the city of assignment to reflect the number of dependants who return to the city of assignment, and are recalculated to reflect any further change in family configuration in the city of assignment.
To be considered as an "accompanying dependant" for the calculation of the overseas allowance, a dependant must reside with the cooperant/advisor in the city of assignment for 8 consecutive months of any 12-month period. If this condition is not met, all expenses and benefits paid for the said dependant will be recuperated from the cooperant/advisor.

9.6 Notification of Changes

Since a cooperant's/advisor's overseas allowance changes with the variables listed previously, it is essential to notify the Administrative Officer without delay of all changes which could affect the calculation such as permanent and/or temporary arrivals and departures to and from the city of assignment.


Technical Assistance Handbook — Chapter 10 — Short-Term Assignment and Short-Term Relocation

Consecutive short-term assignments or short-term relocations cannot be changed to longer term assignments in arrears.

10.1 Short-term Assignment

A short-term assignment is an assignment of less than 4 consecutive months. Individuals travelling under short-term assignment status are not entitled to benefits in this Handbook. Travel expenses are reimbursed according to the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). Consecutive extensions to a short-term assignment shall not constitute the application of the short-term relocation benefits retroactively to the commencement of the short-term assignment. The provisions of a short-term assignment shall continue to apply.

Business Class air fares shall never be authorized for cooperants/advisors.

10.2 Short-term Relocation

A short-term relocation is an assignment of more than four (4) but less than twelve (12) consecutive months in a developing country or country in transition. Extensions to a short-term relocation assignment shall not constitute the application of the long-term assignment benefits retroactively to the commencement of the short-term relocation assignment. The provisions of a short-term relocation assignment shall continue to apply.

Note: Except for telephone calls home, there are no provisions related to dependants in the case of a short-term relocation and the cooperant/advisor is entitled to a modified overseas allowance.

10.2.1 Prior to departure for the country of assignment

  • Requirements

    Before signing the contract, the cooperant/advisor being considered for a short-term relocation must meet the following conditions pertaining to medical examination, insurance coverage, security clearance and visa requirements.

    • Medical examination

      As for long-term assignment, the candidate must successfully undergo a medical examination, using the medical form shown in Appendix 2 and any related costs for this examination are reimbursed. Executing agencies may also use the form in Appendix 2, or use their own form. Refer to Chapter 2.1 except that references to accompanying dependants do not apply as there is no provision for dependants on a short-term relocation.

    • Accident and sickness Insurance

      Before signing the contract, the Administrative Officer must ensure that the cooperant/advisor meets CIDA's minimum insurance coverage for the period of the contract. Refer to Chapter 2.2.1 for minimum mandatory coverage. The cooperant/advisor will be reimbursed for insurance premiums according to Chapter 2.2.4.

    • Security clearance

      Refer to Chapter 2.3.

    • VISA requirements of the country of assignment

      Refer to Chapter 2.4.

    • Pre-departure training

      The cooperant/advisor is required to attend a pre-departure training session. The Administrative Officer is required to ensure the cooperant/advisor attends the pre-departure training session. Refer to Chapter 2.8 for information on briefing/training sessions.

  • Accountable advance

    See Chapter 2.9 for admissible advances and conditions of repayment.

  • Storage of household effects

    If the cooperant/advisor must relinquish their principal residence in Canada to undertake the assignment overseas, storage costs may be reimbursed in accordance with the same provisions as for a long-term assignment (see Chapter 3.5). With respect to restricted household effects (see Chapter 3.4), the same restrictions apply.

  • Shipping of household effects

    The Administrative Officer shall determine whether any or all of the cooperant's/advisor's household effects shall be shipped.

    Actual and reasonable costs for the shipment of household effects may be reimbursed in accordance with the provisions referred to for long-term assignments up to a maximum of fifty percent (50%) of the weight limitations of a single person (see Chapter 3.3 for the weight limitation). These limits include the weight of the wrapping and packing materials but exclude the weight of crating, which varies from country to country. Crating materials may add approximately twenty percent (20%) to the actual weight of the personal possessions.

    In the case of a short-term relocation, only one shipment is authorized. Restricted household effects are the same as for a long-term assignment (see Chapter 3.4).

    • Technical material

      The Administrative Officer may increase the shipping entitlement by an amount sufficient to cover the cost of transporting technical material or equipment for the project, if these are deemed necessary by the Project Manager. The same provisions found in long-term assignments (see Chapter 3.2.3) shall apply.

  • Relocation transportation expenses

    The provisions of Chapter 4.2 shall apply except that reference to accompanying dependants does not apply as there is no provision for accompanying dependants on a short-term relocation. Business Class air fares are never authorized for cooperants or advisors.

10.2.2 Assignment overseas

During a short-term relocation, the cooperant/advisor must occupy self-contained accommodation as soon as possible after the arrival in the city of assignment. The Project Manager and the cooperant/advisor must combine their efforts in order to identify self-contained accommodation, if possible, even before leaving Canada. Without being obligated to do so, project resources in the city of assignment may be able to provide assistance in this search for housing.

  • Overseas allowances

    The Post Living Allowance and Post Differential Allowance shall apply in accordance with Chapter 9.2 and 9.3 respectively. The periods of application are described in Chapter 9.5 of this Handbook.

  • Living expenses

    Upon arrival in the city of assignment, the applicable Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address) daily location meal allowance shall be payable for the first 21 days.

    From the 22nd day,

    • in self-contained accommodation, the cooperant/advisor receives, for the duration of the assignment, a daily meal allowance equivalent to sixty-five percent (65%) of the daily dinner meal allowance for that location;

    • in commercial accommodation, only if meal-preparation facilities are not available and if self-contained accommodation is not obtainable, the cooperant/advisor receives a daily meal allowance equivalent to sixty-five percent (65%) of the daily meal allowance for that location.

    Special circumstances

    Where, due to special circumstances such as difficulty in finding food and private accommodation, or if restaurant facilities are limited, and the Project Manager deems the meal allowance outlined above as inadequate, a meal allowance considered reasonable may be authorized by the Administrative Officer, not to exceed the daily meal allowance for that location.

  • Housing

    The provisions of Chapter 7 shall apply except that references to accompanying dependants do not apply as there is no provision for accompanying dependants on a short-term relocation.

  • Commuting assistance

    As in Canada, all cooperants/advisors are required to provide their own transportation to and from work. If commuting costs exceed those in Canada, actual and reasonable commuting costs by the most economical means of transport, i.e. one round-trip each working day between the home and the office, which exceed an amount published in the Schedules to the Technical Assistance Handbook (refer to Chapter 1.10 for Internet address) may be reimbursed. The amount published shall be amended each September.

  • Telephone calls home

    When dependants occupy the principal residence at the contract address, the cost of a weekly ten-minute direct-dialed telephone call home, at discount rates where available and practical, may be reimbursed.

  • Travel to Canada

    For a short-term relocation assignment of at least six months or more, and where the cooperant/advisor has dependants residing at the principal residence at the contract address, the cost of one return air fare, at the most economical air fare possible and appropriate in the circumstances between the major airport closest to the city of assignment and the major airport closest to the contract address in Canada, may be reimbursed.

  • Leave

    Refer to:

    • Chapter 6.1 Statutory Holidays,
    • Chapter 6.2 Annual leave - applied on a prorated basis,
    • Chapter 6.3 Sick leave and
    • Chapter 6.5 Other leave

10.2.3 End of assignment

  • Shipping of household effects

    Limitations governing the shipping of household effects to Canada are the same as at the beginning of the assignment (see Section 10.2.1 d)). The cooperant/advisor is responsible for clearance through Canadian customs of all household effects, and for any related duties and charges.

  • De-Briefing session

    The Project Manager may approve a de-briefing session as part of the activities in executing a CIDA project. See Chapter 2.8.2 for information on de-briefing sessions.


Technical Assistance Handbook—Chapter 11— Non Medical Emergency Evacuation

Emergency Evacuation Plan

Local emergency situations resulting from civil strife or natural disaster require special attention to personal safety, and possibly, as a last resort, emergency evacuation. The information in this chapter is based on CIDA's Emergency Evacuation Guidelines which can be obtained from CIDA's Technical Assistance Unit.

11.1 Role of the Embassy/High Commission

All Canadian Diplomatic Missions (Embassies or High Commissions) have contingency plans for dealing with such situations, and are responsible for coordinating the Canadian response to any local crisis situation abroad. They will advise the Canadian community of precautions, and, where necessary, on how to implement their emergency plan.

The cooperant/advisor/executing agencies must co-operate with the Canadian Diplomatic Mission in the planning and operation of emergency measures.

  • Warden system

    In emergency situations, the Canadian Diplomatic Mission will do everything possible to contact Canadians in the field, either directly or through a voluntary warden system. This system designates persons located throughout a region or the country as responsible for contacting a specific group of Canadians. This system allows the Canadian Diplomatic Mission personnel to provide information and advice concerning safety precautions, and, as a last resort, evacuation measures.

    The warden system works best as a two-way channel of communication. The cooperant/advisor may be asked to participate in the system, and the Canadian Diplomatic Mission will rely heavily on information about local situations relayed to it by Canadians in various regions of the country. In the event of an evacuation, the project may have resources, such as vehicles, supplies of gasoline, food, or radios which could be invaluable.

    On arrival in the city of assignment, the cooperant/advisor must contact the Canadian Diplomatic Mission, in person if possible, but at least by telephone, to obtain the name and location of their warden.

  • Information for the Canadian Diplomatic Mission

    CIDA or the executing agency will provide the Canadian Diplomatic Mission with information about their cooperants/advisors and dependants before they leave Canada. This should include the location of the assignment, dates of travel, and routing and where it is known, information about accommodation and their CIDA project contacts.

    If unknown in advance of travel, the cooperant/advisor will complete it on arrival in the field, and provide it to the Canadian Diplomatic Mission

  • Registration card

    Once overseas, the cooperant/advisor must complete a Registration Card for Canadians Residing Abroad and send it to the Canadian Diplomatic Mission in the city of assignment. If Canada does not have a Diplomatic Mission in that country, the Canadian Diplomatic Mission responsible may be in an adjacent country. Otherwise, the cooperant/advisor will register with an Honorary Canadian Consul, or with the missions of Australia, the U.S.A., Britain or France.

    Information on the registration card is protected.

11.2 Being Prepared for an Emergency Situation

  • Information

    The cooperant/advisor must be well-briefed about the organization of their project. They should be sure to have the following minimal information:

    • basic information on the means of communication available (telephone, Internet, fax, radio), and the contact numbers of people and organizations involved with the project, including the warden in case of emergency
    • names and contact numbers of the Project Manager or his representative and of the CIDA Field Representative;
    • information on methods of transportation available to leave the region or the country and different possible itineraries, including:
      • a list of the nearest cities from which international flights originate;
      • information about transportation (trains, buses, flights) to those cities and several itineraries;
      • maps;
      • suggested alternate means of communication (e.g. radio contact) as decided locally; and
      • steps to follow in the event of civil disturbance.

      Note: In a crisis situation, this information will be supplemented by the Canadian Diplomatic Mission.

  • Identification

    The cooperant/advisor and family members must ensure that their passports and visas are valid. It is also advisable to keep photocopies of passports and visas.

    Particularly where there are language barriers, the cooperant/advisor should request from his local host group a letter, written in the local language, which identifies him and confirms his presence as a cooperant or an advisor on a CIDA project.

  • Emergency preparedness

    There are several things the cooperant/advisor and their families can do in advance to prepare themselves either to last out a short-term emergency, or to be ready to move if necessary.

    Short-wave radio: Each family must have a short-wave radio to be able to monitor Radio-Canada, the BBC and the Voice of America. When conditions are severe enough that Canadians should consider leaving the country, warning broadcasts through these networks will be arranged by Foreign Affairs Canada.

    Security precautions: Housing must be secure (use locks, security lights, etc.); check fire extinguishers; if there is no anti-Canadian sentiment, put Canadian flags or stickers on your house and car; carry identity papers (passport, visas) with you, but not in bags or briefcases from which you could easily become separated. Do the same with money and air or train tickets.

    Communications: Keep travel documents (passports and visas) up-to-date and at hand. Make sure you are registered with the Canadian Diplomatic Mission as described above. Keep good road maps of the city and country on hand at all times. Make sure you have an inventory of your personal and household effects (i.e. proof of ownership, insurance policies).

  • Stages of a crisis

    Most crises develop over a period of time, and the cooperant/advisor should be prepared for various stages of response. Not all crises will reach the final stage, or even go beyond the first one. Letters from the Canadian Diplomatic Mission, or information received through the warden, will inform Canadians of what stage has been reached. These are:

    • a period when the cooperant/advisor and families should stay at home and under cover;
    • a period at which, unless one is designated "essential personnel", one should leave while there is still commercial transportation operating. At this point it is the responsibility of the cooperant/advisor to leave; at a later stage, the Canadian Diplomatic Mission may be unable to arrange transport.
    • in the final stage, emergency evacuation, the cooperant/advisor and the entire family will be evacuated, regardless of nationality. Please note, however, that a person carrying the nationality of the country of assignment will be subject to local laws, which may preclude evacuation.

    In the event of hostilities
    Stay away from crowds during any hostilities, move around as little as possible, particularly after dark, and stay away from unfamiliar places.

11.4 Emergency Evacuation Expenses

  • General conditions

    Where an emergency evacuation is officially sanctioned by the Canadian Diplomatic Mission, those evacuated will normally pay their own expenses and later claim reimbursement. However, persons for whom such expenses present major problems may seek assistance from the Administrative Officer. No person will be denied evacuation due to lack of funds.

    If, following a decision by Foreign Affairs Canada, the cooperant, advisor or accompanying dependant must be evacuated, evacuation costs will be paid as outlined below. For shorter term personnel, CIDA's or the executing agency's financial liability will be limited to reasonable evacuation costs.

    In exceptional cases, those individuals who decide to evacuate and cover their own costs, reasonable evacuation costs will be reimbursed if the CIDA Branch responsible for the project subsequently decides, on the advice of the Head of Mission, that the individual circumstances facing the CIDA personnel required evacuation.

    CIDA or the executing agency will reimburse reasonable evacuation costs upon submission and approval of invoices. The following information should also be provided: the name, function, and number of dependants of the evacuated cooperant/advisor, with details of the evacuation such as point of departure, route, final destination, costs incurred. Receipts for accommodation and travel must be provided.

    While on emergency evacuation status, Vacation Travel Assistance (VTA) cannot be authorized or utilized, as VTA must commence from the city of assignment. Any planned VTA booked but not utilized during the evacuation period must be cancelled. Cancellation fees are reimbursable. If there is a cost to change the return to the city of assignment portion of the VTA airline ticket, fees associated with the change are reimbursable. If the cooperant/advisor and/or their accompanying dependants are temporarily away from the city of assignment when the evacuation is ordered, the provisions of this chapter will not apply until the scheduled end date of the temporary absence from the city of assignment. Expenses incurred during the scheduled temporary absence remain the cooperant's/advisor's responsibility.

  • Continuation of fees and benefits during project suspensions

    In cases where project operations are suspended, the cooperant's/advisor's fee will continue to be paid for up to thirty (30) days, during which time CIDA and the Canadian Diplomatic Mission will keep project conditions under continuous review. The final day to include in the overseas allowance calculation is the 25th working day after departure from the city of assignment (see Overseas Allowances - Periods of Application 9.5).

    At the end of the thirty (30) day period, a decision will be made by CIDA whether to reinstate, continue the temporary suspension or terminate project activities. Whatever the option chosen, decisions on expenses will be made according to the provisions of the contract and operational requirements.

  • Lost or damaged household effects during emergency evacuation

    For the assignment overseas, the cooperant/advisor must avoid bringing valuable objects and it is strongly recommended that the cooperant/advisor insure household effects with full replacement value against loss or damage. CIDA will not reimburse the cost of this insurance. CIDA is not liable for the loss or damage to the cooperant's/advisor's household effects.

  • Admissible costs

    For the cooperant, admissible costs may vary according to evacuation conditions and the Administrative Officer will provide the details. For emergency financing, the cooperant shall contact Technical Assistance Unit and the advisor will contact the executing agency.

    The following are guidelines for admissible costs based on past evacuations and apply equally to cooperants and advisors. The costs outlined below apply to costs incurred at the approved evacuation destination. If the cooperant/advisor/accompanying dependant chooses an evacuation destination other than the approved evacuation destination, evacuation costs will be limited to costs listed below at either: the evacuation destination, the approved evacuation destination OR in Canada, whichever costs are less.

    • Transportation expenses (see definition)

      Transportation expenses for the cooperant/advisor and accompanying dependants including a kilometre rate according to the Treasury Board Travel Directive, if travel by personal motor vehicle is recommended for evacuation and the cooperant/advisor drives to a location within 500 kilometres of the city of assignment. The airfare entitlement is up to full fare economy from the city of assignment to the approved evacuation destination and return to the city of assignment by the most direct routing. Return fares must be booked with the return portion as "open ticket".

      Days in transit to the approved evacuation destination are not included in the days noted below in Sections ii), iii) and iv). Meals, incidental allowance and accommodation expenses while in transit may be claimed based on the authorized stopover location rates (see Chapter 4.2.2.b iv.).

    • Accommodation

      Commercial self-contained accommodation with kitchen facilities is authorized based on a monthly rate.

      Private accommodation is authorized and the cooperant/advisor can claim four hundred and twenty Canadian dollars (C$420) for each month. For periods of less than one full calendar month, the amount will be prorated using the following formula: 420 x 12/ 365 x number of days in the month.

      Commercial hotel with no kitchen facilities will not be authorized unless there is no commercial self-contained units available within a reasonable distance from the approved evacuation destination.

    • Meal allowance

      Meal allowance refers to the rate published as part of the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address).

      If the approved evacuation destination is in Canada or the United States: the meal allowance for children up to 12 years of age will be calculated at fifty percent (50%) of the daily amount for Canada and the United States; the meal allowance for children 12 years of age and over will be calculated at one hundred percent (100%) of the daily amount for Canada and the United States.

      If the approved evacuation destination is outside Canada and the United States: the meal allowance for children up to 4 years of age will be calculated at fifty percent (50%) of the daily amount for approved evacuation destination; the meal allowance for children 4 years of age and over will be calculated at one hundred percent (100%) of the daily amount for the approved evacuation destination.

      In a commercial self-contained unit or in private accommodation:

      Days 1 -2: one hundred percent (100%) of the approved evacuation destination daily meal allowance.

      Days 3 - 21: eighty percent (80%) of the approved evacuation destination daily meal allowance.

      Days 22 - 60: sixty-five percent (65%) of the approved evacuation destination dinner allowance.

      and where authorized:

      In a commercial hotel with no kitchen facility:

      Days 1 -2: one hundred percent (100%) of the approved evacuation destination daily meal allowance.

      Days 3 - 21: one hundred percent (100%) of the approved evacuation destination daily meal allowance.

      Days 22 - 60: sixty-five percent (65%) of the approved evacuation destination dinner allowance.

    • Incidental allowance:

      The incidental allowance refers to the rates published in the Treasury Board Travel Directive (see Chapter 1.10 for the Internet address). Only one incidental allowance can be claimed for the whole family unit and NOT an incidental allowance for each person travelling.

      In commercial self-contained accommodation or commercial hotel:

      Days 1 -21: Incidental allowance for the approved evacuation destination.

      Days 22 - 60: None

      In private accommodation:

      None

    • Extended absence from the project

      There may be situations where the project is not cancelled, but the cooperant/advisor and his family are not authorized to return to the city of assignment for some time.

      Normally in such situations, while temporary accommodation costs are being paid, the cooperant/advisor receives full fee, but the overseas allowance is suspended after the twenty-fifth (25th) working day. If CIDA requires the cooperant/advisor to return to the project in advance of their family, temporary living costs for the family, as well as appropriate education costs, will be covered until the family is reunited in the city of assignment or until the family relocates to Canada.


Technical Assistance Handbook—Chapter 12 — Non-Accountable Allowances—Verification and Reporting

Canada Revenue Agency issued an opinion that reimbursement of most actual expenses are considered taxable while the issuance of non-accountable allowances is not. In order to maintain a comparable level of non-taxable benefits, it was necessary for CIDA to request amendments to the Technical Assistance Regulations to obtain authorization to provide non-accountable allowances.

The subsequent conversion of some entitlements and reimbursements to non-accountable allowances has resulted in significant changes to certain administrative procedures. Detailed accountability procedures requiring a list of exact expenditures, with supporting receipts, no longer apply.

However, one of the conditions for issuing non-accountable allowances is that they be spent only for the specific purpose identified by the Administrative Officer.

The onus continues to be on the cooperant/advisor to demonstrate that the funds were spent for the specific purpose for which they were issued.

The issue and verification procedures apply to the following non-accountable allowances:

  • Chapter 5.4.2 - Vacation Travel Allowance
  • Chapter 5.5 - Family Reunion Travel Allowance
  • Chapter 5.6 - Education Travel Allowance
  • Chapter 5.7 - Compassionate Travel Allowance

Issuing Allowances

  • The cooperant/advisor is required, when requested by the Administrative Officer, to demonstrate that the allowance has been used for the purpose intended.
  • Within the time-limits specified below in e) below, the cooperant/advisor must complete and submit the appropriate Allowance Certification Form (Appendix 11). This certification, which must be signed or sent by e-mail from the cooperant's/advisor's e-mail account, will form the basis for any subsequent audit by the Administrative Officer.
  • Receipts need not be submitted with the Travel Allowance Certification Form (Appendix 11), however, Cooperants/advisors are required to retain evidence of expenditures to support the purpose of the allowance for a period of seven (7) years. If the cooperant/advisor cannot demonstrate that the allowance has been used for the purpose intended, when requested to do so by the Administrative Officer or Auditor, the allowance will be adjusted and reduced by that portion of the allowance which cannot be substantiated (see example #2 below). Note: Travel expenses paid for through frequent flyer points or any other point system are not eligible for consideration under any of the travel allowances.
  • Under normal circumstances, no further allowances will be issued until the cooperant/advisor has submitted the Allowance Certification Form (Appendix 11), including any required/requested documentation regarding a previous allowance.
  • Except as otherwise specified in this section, the cooperant/advisor should provide evidence of travel:
    • within 30 days of completion of travel or
    • at the end of the contract

Vacation Travel Allowance (VTA) Example 1

A family of four travels from the city of assignment under the Vacation Travel provisions. The routing is London, Hong Kong, Manila and return. The allowance is $10,000. The advisor's VTA Request form shows that the trip will last 15 days. The advisor proposes excursion fares of approximately $8,000.

On return, the advisor provides certification of the use of the allowance. Later, as part of the verification process, the Administrative Officer requests that the advisor confirm that the family travelled to Manila. The advisor demonstrates that travel to Manila took place by providing passport entry stamps and hotel bills. Given that the airfare amount was reasonable, and that some commercial accommodation was used, it is assumed that most, if not all of the allowance was spent on the purpose intended. No further action is necessary.

VTA Example 2:

The same family files the same travel plan. On their return, the advisor indicates on the Travel Certification Form that the family travelled instead to Rome. On request, the advisor is not able to provide any airline tickets to the Administrative Officer, but does provide boarding cards. It is known that an excursion fare to Rome would cost no more than $800 each for a total of $3,200. The advisor cannot provide evidence of commercial accommodation, car rental agreements or other transportation vouchers. Considering the family has been away 15 days, it can be assumed that some commercial meals were taken, but the advisor has not demonstrated that the allowance was spent as intended, that is, fifty percent (50%) of the allowance paid was not spent on transportation, ninety percent (90%) of the allowance paid was not spent on travel and travel-related expenses.

The Administrative Officer will require that the advisor return the unsubstantiated portion of the allowance.

Definitions

This section presents an alphabetical listing of terms commonly used in the Technical Assistance Handbook. Following each definition is the cross-reference term in the other official language.

Accompanying dependant
In a long-term assignment, a dependant (see definition) who resides with the cooperant/advisor in the city of assignment for at least eight (8) consecutive months of any twelve (12) month period. (Personne à charge qui accompagne)
Actual and reasonable expenses
Specific itemized expenses incurred and based on receipts, up to the amount deemed by CIDA to be justifiable in the circumstances. (Frais réels et raisonnables)
Administrative Officer
The official responsible for the administration of the benefits described in this Handbook.
  • For the cooperant: the CIDA employee acting as the Administrative Officer for the Technical Assistance Unit.
  • For the advisor: the executing agency will identify their Administrative Officer to the advisor. It may be the same person as the Project Manager. (Agent d'administration)
Advisor
A person with a contract address (see definition) in Canada, under contract to or employed by a Canadian Executing Agency to provide full time services in a developing country or country in transition. (Conseiller)
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
The Agency of the Government of Canada responsible for carrying out development assistance programs in developing countries and countries in transition.(Agence canadienne de développement international (ACDI))
Centre for Intercultural Learning
The Centre that provides training for Canadians assigned overseas and for professionals, students and trainees coming to Canada. The Centre also provides professional support programs for Canadians and host country nationals working on CIDA-funded projects. (Centre d'apprentissage Interculturel)
CIDA Field Representative
The CIDA official responsible for coordinating Canada's official development assistance in the country of assignment. (Représentant de l'ACDI sur le terrain)
City of Assignment
The city, community, or other geographic locality where the office to which a cooperant/advisor is ordinarily assigned by CIDA. (Ville d'affectation)
Commercial accommodation
Lodgingfacilities such as hotels, motels, corporate residences or apartments. (Logement commercial)
Common-law Partner
A person identified by the cooperant/advisor in the declaration (see Appendix 1) who is cohabiting with the cooperant/advisor in a conjugal relationship, having so cohabited for a period of at least one year. (Conjoint de fait)
Continuous Assignment
An uninterrupted period during which a cooperant or an advisor is assigned to one or more CIDA funded projects, providing that the periods of service mentioned in the contract follow one another without interruption. This period of continuous assignment is used to establish long term benefits. A period of continuous assignment includes:
  • moving from one project to another;
  • moving from one city of assignment to another; and
  • a change in contract status, such as going from a contract with CIDA to a contract with an executing agency or vice versa. (Affectation continue)
Contract
  • For the cooperant: the contract or agreement that links that person directly to CIDA, to provide services in a developing country or country in transition, on a CIDA-funded project.
  • For the advisor: the contract signed with an executing agency, or the agreement that an executing agency employee signed with his employer, to provide services in a developing country or country in transition, on a CIDA-funded project. (Contract)
Contract address
The permanent place of residence in Canada, occupied by the cooperant/advisor, immediately prior to undertaking the assignment overseas, as indicated in the contract. The contract address shall remain fixed for the duration of the entire assignment, including "continuous assignments" (see definition). (Adresse au contrat)
Cooperant
A person with a contract address (see definition) in Canada, under direct contract with CIDA to provide full time services in a developing country or country in transition. (Coopérant)
Country of Assignment
The countryin which the city of assignment is located. (Pays d'affectation)
Cross posting
The assignment of a cooperant/advisor from one city of assignment to another city of assignment on one or more CIDA-funded projects.(Mutation)
Daily Commuting Allowance
An allowance to compensate the excess commuting costs in the city of assignment, by the most economical means of transport, for a daily return journey between the residence and office, during a short-term relocation. (Indemnité de transport quotidien)
Dependant
  • The spouse or common-law partner of the cooperant/advisor; or
  • A child of the cooperant/advisor, including a child adopted legally or in fact by the cooperant/advisor, or a child of the cooperant's/advisor's spouse/common-law partner, who ordinarily resides with the cooperant/advisor and the cooperant's/advisor's spouse/common-law partner and is:
    • under 21 years of age and dependent on the cooperant/advisor, or the cooperant's/advisor's spouse/common-law partner for financial support, or
    • 21 years of age or older and dependent on the cooperant/advisor, or the cooperant's/advisor's spouse/common-law partner for financial support by reason of mental or physical incapacity. (Personne à charge)
Duty Travel
CIDA assignment related business travel outside the normal city of assignment. (Voyages pour fins professionnelles)
Executing agency (EA)
Canadian private firm, non-governmental organization (NGO), educational institution, provincial or federal government department or any other organization selected by CIDA to implement a project or project components in a developing country or country in transition. (Agence d'exécution)
Foreign Service Directives (FSD)
A set of emoluments and conditions of employment, in combination with salary, enabling federal departments and agencies to manage Public Service of Canada employees serving abroad.(Directives sur le service extérieur)
Household effects
The furniture, household equipment and personal articles of cooperants or advisors and their dependants, but excluding certain restricted household effects. (Effets mobiliers)
Incidental expenses
A daily allowance while in travel status, to cover costs for items such as gratuities (other than those related to meals and taxi use), laundry, dry cleaning, bottled water, phone calls home, snow removal, grass cutting, home security checks, plant watering, mail services, depreciation of luggage and other personal supplies and services, pet care, telecommunications hook-ups and service, shipping of some personal effects. (Faux frais)
Living expenses
Actual and reasonable expenses for accommodation, meals, and incidentals. (Frais de subsistance)
Long-term assignment
A full time assignment of twelve (12) consecutive months or more, in a developing country or country in transition, on a CIDA-funded project. (Affectation de longue durée)
Parent
A natural or adoptive parent or a person who is formally appointed legal guardian of the cooperant/advisor/spouse/common-law partner, or, with the approval of the Administrative Officer, a foster or surrogate parent. (Parent)
Private non-commercial accommodation
Private dwelling or non-commercial facilities where the traveller does not normally reside. (Logement particulier non commercial)
Project Manager
  • For the cooperant: the manager of the project in the country of assignment or the manager responsible for coordinating, at CIDA's headquarters, Canada's official development assistance in the country of assignment. CIDA will identify their Project Manager to the cooperant.
  • For the advisor: an executing agency manager, in Canada or in the country of assignment, responsible for managing the project. The executing agency will identify their Project Manager to the advisor. (Gestionnaire de projet)
Receipt
An original document or carbon copy showing the date and amount of expenditure paid by the cooperant/advisor. (Reçu)
Self-contained accommodation
Accommodation obtainable at weekly or monthly rates which provides sleeping, meal preparation and refrigeration facilities. (Logement indépendant)
Short-term assignment
An assignment of less than four (4) consecutive months in a developing country or country in transition on a CIDA-funded contract. (Affectation de courte durée)
Short-term relocation
An assignment of at least four (4) months but less than twelve (12) consecutive months in a developing country or country in transition on a CIDA-funded contract. (Réinstallation à court terme)
Student dependant
A dependent child who attends an elementary or secondary level educational institution full-time, from junior kindergarten up to and including the school year of the said dependant child's 20th birthday and for whom an education allowance is paid for this child. At the kindergarten level, "full-time" may mean half-days. (Étudiant à charge)
Technical Assistance Regulations (TAR)
The regulations respecting technical assistance to developing countries and countries in transition, approved by Privy Council Order, are the authority by which the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) may retain the services of cooperants and pay the training of nationals from developing countries or countries in transition. (Règlement sur l'assistance technique)
Technical Assistance Unit
The section in CIDA responsible for publishing and interpreting this Handbook; responsible for issuing cooperant contracts and the administration of cooperant benefits authorized under this Handbook. (Unité d'assistance technique)
Transportation expense
The actual and reasonable cost of air fare of persons only. Business class air fares shall never be authorized for cooperants/advisors or their families. Upgrades to business class may be personally paid for by the cooperant/advisor. (Frais de transport)
Travel expenses
The actual and reasonable cost of air transportation, accommodation, local transportation to and from airports, meals and incidental expenses directly associated with travel not exceeding the Treasury Board Travel Directive. (Frais de voyage)
Treasury Board Travel Directive
Provisions for the reimbursement of reasonable expenses necessarily incurred while travelling on government business and to ensure that travellers are not out-of-pocket. These provisions do not constitute income or other compensation that would open the way for personal gain. (Directive du Conseil du Trésor sur les voyages)

The Directive applies to employees of the Public Service of Canada. Treasury Board has extended some provisions of the Travel Directive to other groups such as persons under contract. Most cooperants/advisors and executing agencies are obliged by their contract with CIDA to use the Directive in calculating travel expenses for personnel. In such cases, the Directive stipulates that a contract specifying travel expenses "in accordance with the Treasury Board Travel Directive", refers to the negotiated meal rates, incidental allowances and transportation expenses specified in Appendices "C" and "D" of the Travel Directive and to provisions referring to "travellers" as opposed to those referring to "employees". For example, business class travel and weekend travel home provisions are not an entitlement for contractors. Business class air fares shall never be authorized for cooperants/advisors or their families.